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(NAC) N-acetylcysteine.

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Yes. I recommend it along with MSM.


topical:

tea tree oil soap.

qh mint julep mask.

hydrogen peroxide for occassional spot treatment.

shaving for exfoliation.

internally:

fish oil, 3g daily.


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yea I have been taking it for the past year.

Its not a cure but it helped me alot.


Mary Jane invades my brain now I can't complain

I'm sayin what else is there to do besides relax

Let the problems in your mind become ancient artifacts

Perhaps these raps can help you alleviate

The things that's got you trippin you watch me demonstrate

First you ignore the nonsense and clear your conscience

Let your pen touch the paper write verbs and consonants

As the words become a sentence you start to feelin different

The stress is out your mind you feel like the weight was lifted Terrific

I'm glad we had this time to discuss

I'm outro call me if you want to blaze one up


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NAC and milk thistle have been shown to be supportive of liver function. although i question the link between the liver and acne, NAC and milk thistle are good things in terms of general health.

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NAC and milk thistle have been shown to be supportive of liver function. although i question the link between the liver and acne, NAC and milk thistle are good things in terms of general health.

The liver breaks down active hormones into their less active state....that would be a good thing. Anyway, NAC is brilliant for many reasons just as the liver in good health is brilliant for many reasons. Regarding acne NAC can do the following:

Detoxify heavy metals (perhaps eliminating mercury)

Increase Glutathione

Decrease/Regulate IGF-1

Improve Glucose Metabolism (has to do with glutathione & inflammation)

Reduces oxidation (prevents inflammaton, etc)

Reduce Inflammation (i.e. TNFa that can damage Glut4 involved in glucose metabolism in cells)

Decrease Insulin Resistance (due to above )

Decrease/Regulate hormones associated with acne

Fertil Steril. 2002 Jun;77(6):1128-35. Related Articles, Links

N-acetyl-cysteine treatment improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Fulghesu AM, Ciampelli M, Muzj G, Belosi C, Selvaggi L, Ayala GF, Lanzone A.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on insulin secretion and peripheral insulin resistance in subjects with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN: Prospective data analysis. SETTING: Volunteer women in an academic research environment. PATIENT(S): Six lean and 31 obese subjects, aged 19-33 years. INTERVENTION(S): Patients were treated for 5-6 weeks with NAC at a dose of 1.8 g/day orally. A dose of 3 g/day was arbitrarily chosen for massively obese subjects. Six of 31 obese patients with PCOS were treated with placebo and served as controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Before and after the treatment period, the hormonal and lipid blood profile and insulin sensitivity, assessed by an hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. RESULT(S): Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and glucose area under curve (AUC) were unchanged after treatment. Insulin AUC after OGTT was significantly reduced, and the peripheral insulin sensitivity increased after NAC administration, whereas the hepatic insulin extraction was unaffected. The NAC treatment induced a significant fall in T levels and in free androgen index values (P<.05). In analyzing patients according to their insulinemic response to OGTT, normoinsulinemic subjects and placebo-treated patients did not show any modification of the above parameters, whereas a significant improvement was observed in hyperinsulinemic subjects. CONCLUSION(S): NAC may be a new treatment for the improvement of insulin circulating levels and insulin sensitivity in hyperinsulinemic patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Publication Types:

Clinical Trial

Controlled Clinical Trial

PMID: 12057717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct;285(4):E744-53. Epub 2003 Jun 10. Related Articles, Links

N-acetylcysteine and taurine prevent hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance in vivo: possible role of oxidative stress.

Haber CA, Lam TK, Yu Z, Gupta N, Goh T, Bogdanovic E, Giacca A, Fantus IG.

Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X5.

Exposure to high concentrations of glucose and insulin results in insulin resistance of metabolic target tissues, a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes. High glucose has also been associated with oxidative stress, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species have been proposed to cause insulin resistance. To determine whether oxidative stress contributes to insulin resistance induced by hyperglycemia in vivo, nondiabetic rats were infused with glucose for 6 h to maintain a circulating glucose concentration of 15 mM with and without coinfusion of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), followed by a 2-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. High glucose (HG) induced a significant decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake [tracer-determined disappearance rate (Rd), control 41.2 +/- 1.7 vs. HG 32.4 +/- 1.9 mg. kg-1. min-1, P < 0.05], which was prevented by NAC (HG + NAC 45.9 +/- 3.5 mg. kg-1. min-1). Similar results were obtained with the antioxidant taurine. Neither NAC nor taurine alone altered Rd. HG caused a significant (5-fold) increase in soleus muscle protein carbonyl content, a marker of oxidative stress that was blocked by NAC, as well as elevated levels of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, markers of lipid peroxidation, which were reduced by taurine. In contrast to findings after long-term hyperglycemia, there was no membrane translocation of novel isoforms of protein kinase C in skeletal muscle after 6 h. These data support the concept that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/285/4/E744

Thanks to the first article as well as a few testimonies on Curezone and Soulcysters.net It's been a week since I started taking a therapeutic dose of 1200mg + 2000mg of Vitamin C to deal with unwanted hair (I'll increase if need be). Unless you have a good regimen of diet and exercise or something else, if you want to acheive the results in the study you should take doses used in the study (1800mg - 3200mg or more). Of course it's best to break these supplements into 2 - 4x a day. The Vitamin C should be 2 - 3x the amount of NAC (so I need to take more) and should be divided into 4 doses throughout the day.

That's all for now ;)


These are not steps, but stages some people progress through when going from conventional to holistic medicine. Stage 2 is how I became 99%+ Clear, eliminated my dysmennorhea, significantly reduced my sebum & pore size, etc & is my predominant method.

Stage 1 (Treatment):

* (Daily) Isocare Skin Control Cleanser, Dream Products Customized Natural Face Lotion & Coppertone Sport Spray Sunscreen (mixed)

* (Sporadically) spot treat w/ anti-inflammatory (neosporin, hydrocortisone, salicylic acid) or a skin lightener (post-inflammatory pigmentation) to treat stubborn cystic/nodular acne that appears due to unknowingly or knowingly ingesting a food/ingredient that breaks me out (I do my best to avoid these foods). If you cover treated area w/ a bandaid, it makes product more effective.

Stage 2 (Prevention): "cheapest" method ~ Since Aug. 2002

* Follow a Gluten-Free, Trans-Fat Free, Dairy-Free and No Added Sugar diet for my Insulin Resistance/Hyperandrogenism (Silent Chronic Inflammatory Syndrome)

* Avoid ALL types of nuts and the Genus Prunus (almonds, plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, cherries), Bananas, Pineapples, Cottonseed oil, Artificial Sweetners.

Stage 3 (Correction):

* Strengthen/Repair GI - Immune health

Research:

* Developing functional foods for those with acne & other special needs (assuming there's a defficiency).

* Developing good & "safe" formulas for various hormonal issues for women. Correction stage may resolve this for some.


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NAC and milk thistle have been shown to be supportive of liver function. although i question the link between the liver and acne, NAC and milk thistle are good things in terms of general health.

The liver breaks down active hormones into their less active state....that would be a good thing. Anyway, NAC is brilliant for many reasons just as the liver in good health is brilliant for many reasons. Regarding acne NAC can do the following:

Detoxify heavy metals (perhaps eliminating mercury)

Increase Glutathione

Decrease/Regulate IGF-1

Improve Glucose Metabolism (has to do with glutathione & inflammation)

Reduces oxidation (prevents inflammaton, etc)

Reduce Inflammation (i.e. TNFa that can damage Glut4 involved in glucose metabolism in cells)

Decrease Insulin Resistance (due to above )

Decrease/Regulate hormones associated with acne

Fertil Steril. 2002 Jun;77(6):1128-35. Related Articles, Links

N-acetyl-cysteine treatment improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Fulghesu AM, Ciampelli M, Muzj G, Belosi C, Selvaggi L, Ayala GF, Lanzone A.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on insulin secretion and peripheral insulin resistance in subjects with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN: Prospective data analysis. SETTING: Volunteer women in an academic research environment. PATIENT(S): Six lean and 31 obese subjects, aged 19-33 years. INTERVENTION(S): Patients were treated for 5-6 weeks with NAC at a dose of 1.8 g/day orally. A dose of 3 g/day was arbitrarily chosen for massively obese subjects. Six of 31 obese patients with PCOS were treated with placebo and served as controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Before and after the treatment period, the hormonal and lipid blood profile and insulin sensitivity, assessed by an hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. RESULT(S): Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and glucose area under curve (AUC) were unchanged after treatment. Insulin AUC after OGTT was significantly reduced, and the peripheral insulin sensitivity increased after NAC administration, whereas the hepatic insulin extraction was unaffected. The NAC treatment induced a significant fall in T levels and in free androgen index values (P<.05). In analyzing patients according to their insulinemic response to OGTT, normoinsulinemic subjects and placebo-treated patients did not show any modification of the above parameters, whereas a significant improvement was observed in hyperinsulinemic subjects. CONCLUSION(S): NAC may be a new treatment for the improvement of insulin circulating levels and insulin sensitivity in hyperinsulinemic patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Publication Types:

Clinical Trial

Controlled Clinical Trial

PMID: 12057717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct;285(4):E744-53. Epub 2003 Jun 10. Related Articles, Links

N-acetylcysteine and taurine prevent hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance in vivo: possible role of oxidative stress.

Haber CA, Lam TK, Yu Z, Gupta N, Goh T, Bogdanovic E, Giacca A, Fantus IG.

Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X5.

Exposure to high concentrations of glucose and insulin results in insulin resistance of metabolic target tissues, a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes. High glucose has also been associated with oxidative stress, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species have been proposed to cause insulin resistance. To determine whether oxidative stress contributes to insulin resistance induced by hyperglycemia in vivo, nondiabetic rats were infused with glucose for 6 h to maintain a circulating glucose concentration of 15 mM with and without coinfusion of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), followed by a 2-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. High glucose (HG) induced a significant decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake [tracer-determined disappearance rate (Rd), control 41.2 +/- 1.7 vs. HG 32.4 +/- 1.9 mg. kg-1. min-1, P < 0.05], which was prevented by NAC (HG + NAC 45.9 +/- 3.5 mg. kg-1. min-1). Similar results were obtained with the antioxidant taurine. Neither NAC nor taurine alone altered Rd. HG caused a significant (5-fold) increase in soleus muscle protein carbonyl content, a marker of oxidative stress that was blocked by NAC, as well as elevated levels of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, markers of lipid peroxidation, which were reduced by taurine. In contrast to findings after long-term hyperglycemia, there was no membrane translocation of novel isoforms of protein kinase C in skeletal muscle after 6 h. These data support the concept that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/285/4/E744

Thanks to the first article as well as a few testimonies on Curezone and Soulcysters.net It's been a week since I started taking a therapeutic dose of 1200mg + 2000mg of Vitamin C to deal with unwanted hair (I'll increase if need be). Unless you have a good regimen of diet and exercise or something else, if you want to acheive the results in the study you should take doses used in the study (1800mg - 3200mg or more). Of course it's best to break these supplements into 2 - 4x a day. The Vitamin C should be 2 - 3x the amount of NAC (so I need to take more) and should be divided into 4 doses throughout the day.

That's all for now ;)

just keeping in mind the first study was done in diseased patients, so it could be some sort of deficiency model

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The liver breaks down active hormones into their less active state....that would be a good thing. Anyway, NAC is brilliant for many reasons just as the liver in good health is brilliant for many reasons. Regarding acne NAC can do the following:

Detoxify heavy metals (perhaps eliminating mercury)

Increase Glutathione

Decrease/Regulate IGF-1

Improve Glucose Metabolism (has to do with glutathione & inflammation)

Reduces oxidation (prevents inflammaton, etc)

Reduce Inflammation (i.e. TNFa that can damage Glut4 involved in glucose metabolism in cells)

Decrease Insulin Resistance (due to above )

Decrease/Regulate hormones associated with acne

Fertil Steril. 2002 Jun;77(6):1128-35. Related Articles, Links

N-acetyl-cysteine treatment improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Fulghesu AM, Ciampelli M, Muzj G, Belosi C, Selvaggi L, Ayala GF, Lanzone A.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on insulin secretion and peripheral insulin resistance in subjects with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN: Prospective data analysis. SETTING: Volunteer women in an academic research environment. PATIENT(S): Six lean and 31 obese subjects, aged 19-33 years. INTERVENTION(S): Patients were treated for 5-6 weeks with NAC at a dose of 1.8 g/day orally. A dose of 3 g/day was arbitrarily chosen for massively obese subjects. Six of 31 obese patients with PCOS were treated with placebo and served as controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Before and after the treatment period, the hormonal and lipid blood profile and insulin sensitivity, assessed by an hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. RESULT(S): Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and glucose area under curve (AUC) were unchanged after treatment. Insulin AUC after OGTT was significantly reduced, and the peripheral insulin sensitivity increased after NAC administration, whereas the hepatic insulin extraction was unaffected. The NAC treatment induced a significant fall in T levels and in free androgen index values (P<.05). In analyzing patients according to their insulinemic response to OGTT, normoinsulinemic subjects and placebo-treated patients did not show any modification of the above parameters, whereas a significant improvement was observed in hyperinsulinemic subjects. CONCLUSION(S): NAC may be a new treatment for the improvement of insulin circulating levels and insulin sensitivity in hyperinsulinemic patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Publication Types:

Clinical Trial

Controlled Clinical Trial

PMID: 12057717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

just keeping in mind the first study was done in diseased patients, so it could be some sort of deficiency model

Um...do you not believe that acne is or can be (a symptom of) a disease?

That acne is not related to Insulin Resistance, which is what the first study was concerning (PCOS is one type of disease linked to it)?

Or that acne develops as a result of inflammation (via immune activation) which is what the second study covered?

Thanks.


These are not steps, but stages some people progress through when going from conventional to holistic medicine. Stage 2 is how I became 99%+ Clear, eliminated my dysmennorhea, significantly reduced my sebum & pore size, etc & is my predominant method.

Stage 1 (Treatment):

* (Daily) Isocare Skin Control Cleanser, Dream Products Customized Natural Face Lotion & Coppertone Sport Spray Sunscreen (mixed)

* (Sporadically) spot treat w/ anti-inflammatory (neosporin, hydrocortisone, salicylic acid) or a skin lightener (post-inflammatory pigmentation) to treat stubborn cystic/nodular acne that appears due to unknowingly or knowingly ingesting a food/ingredient that breaks me out (I do my best to avoid these foods). If you cover treated area w/ a bandaid, it makes product more effective.

Stage 2 (Prevention): "cheapest" method ~ Since Aug. 2002

* Follow a Gluten-Free, Trans-Fat Free, Dairy-Free and No Added Sugar diet for my Insulin Resistance/Hyperandrogenism (Silent Chronic Inflammatory Syndrome)

* Avoid ALL types of nuts and the Genus Prunus (almonds, plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, cherries), Bananas, Pineapples, Cottonseed oil, Artificial Sweetners.

Stage 3 (Correction):

* Strengthen/Repair GI - Immune health

Research:

* Developing functional foods for those with acne & other special needs (assuming there's a defficiency).

* Developing good & "safe" formulas for various hormonal issues for women. Correction stage may resolve this for some.


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Here is a study that reveals that the effect of taking 1200 mg of NAC daily is quite significant when it comes to acne. It does not cure it, but will reduce acne a great deal. I am wondering why NAC has not been discussed more frequently on this forum, because it attacks acne on multiple levels. It influences insulin sensitivity positively, helps raise glutathion etc.

http://www.omicsonline.org/2155-9554/2155-9554-3-163.php?aid=10078

Group (2): includes 14 patients, seven males and seven females: were treated with N-acetylcysteine 1200 mg/day orally: one effervescent tablet of N-acetylcysteine 600 milligram (FLUIMUCIL; Zambon company) twice daily.

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Take a wide range of antioxidants regardless of it's effects on acne. Alpha lipoic acid, n acetyl cysteine, and vitamin c is my current antioxidant lineup.

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Here is a study that reveals that the effect of taking 1200 mg of NAC daily is quite significant when it comes to acne. It does not cure it, but will reduce acne a great deal. I am wondering why NAC has not been discussed more frequently on this forum, because it attacks acne on multiple levels. It influences insulin sensitivity positively, helps raise glutathion etc.

http://www.omicsonline.org/2155-9554/2155-9554-3-163.php?aid=10078

Group (2): includes 14 patients, seven males and seven females: were treated with N-acetylcysteine 1200 mg/day orally: one effervescent tablet of N-acetylcysteine 600 milligram (FLUIMUCIL; Zambon company) twice daily.

http://www.acneeinstein.com/studies-reveal-almost-irrefutable-evidence-for-the-root-cause-of-acne/

1 person likes this

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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I took cysteine for some time with B5, neither seemed to do much of anything (although I noticed a slight reduction in oil). My acne is pretty much all comedones, those tiny under-the-skin bumps. I'm wondering if NAC could be worth a try...maybe it's different enough from normal cysteine to make a difference.

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Take a wide range of antioxidants regardless of it's effects on acne. Alpha lipoic acid, n acetyl cysteine, and vitamin c is my current antioxidant lineup.

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I never took NAC, but I took l-glutathione, which is what NAC boosts. I figured I'd go straight to the source and try glutathione first. I know most people say glutathione as a supplement doesn't get utilized in the body because it doesn't get broken down fully so it's not absorbed. However, in my case, I noticed marked improvement within the first week I started taking it. I only took it for 1-2 months at a time because, as with other detoxifiers like milk thistle, it loses its effectiveness. A naturopath/pharmacist recommended I rotate between NAC, selenium, l-glutathione, and milk thistle but milk thistle gave me a nasty reaction so I just stuck with glutathione. I think NAC is definitely stronger, I was just afraid of getting a purging reaction similar to the one I got with milk thistle so I haven't tried it yet. And it's also supposed to have anti-androgenic properties, correct? I've seen it mentioned on PCOS forums.

Question: I was told by my allergist to avoid sulfites because they raise my histamines. Suphur (as in NAC and MSM) is different from sulfites right? I thought there might be some overlap.


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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I never took NAC, but I took l-glutathione, which is what NAC boosts. I figured I'd go straight to the source and try glutathione first. I know most people say glutathione as a supplement doesn't get utilized in the body because it doesn't get broken down fully so it's not absorbed. However, in my case, I noticed marked improvement within the first week I started taking it. I only took it for 1-2 months at a time because, as with other detoxifiers like milk thistle, it loses its effectiveness. A naturopath/pharmacist recommended I rotate between NAC, selenium, l-glutathione, and milk thistle but milk thistle gave me a nasty reaction so I just stuck with glutathione. I think NAC is definitely stronger, I was just afraid of getting a purging reaction similar to the one I got with milk thistle so I haven't tried it yet. And it's also supposed to have anti-androgenic properties, correct? I've seen it mentioned on PCOS forums.

Question: I was told by my allergist to avoid sulfites because they raise my histamines. Suphur (as in NAC and MSM) is different from sulfites right? I thought there might be some overlap.

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W

I never took NAC, but I took l-glutathione, which is what NAC boosts. I figured I'd go straight to the source and try glutathione first. I know most people say glutathione as a supplement doesn't get utilized in the body because it doesn't get broken down fully so it's not absorbed. However, in my case, I noticed marked improvement within the first week I started taking it. I only took it for 1-2 months at a time because, as with other detoxifiers like milk thistle, it loses its effectiveness. A naturopath/pharmacist recommended I rotate between NAC, selenium, l-glutathione, and milk thistle but milk thistle gave me a nasty reaction so I just stuck with glutathione. I think NAC is definitely stronger, I was just afraid of getting a purging reaction similar to the one I got with milk thistle so I haven't tried it yet. And it's also supposed to have anti-androgenic properties, correct? I've seen it mentioned on PCOS forums.

Question: I was told by my allergist to avoid sulfites because they raise my histamines. Suphur (as in NAC and MSM) is different from sulfites right? I thought there might be some overlap.

Time and time again you read that Silymarin/Milk Thistle loses its effectiveness over time. But I have never seen a study or somebody I'd consider an expert mention this. Quite the contrary I know that there are protocols to healing certain diseases that include constant Silymarin supplementation, I actually know a person for whom such a protocol has worked so... I wonder. I have googled but have not found an answer maybe you got one...


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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Glutathion is the strongest antioxidant in the body, it can chelate even have metalls.I boost it using other supps such as zinc, selenium etc

My experience with milk thistle is that you have to find a qquality brand that works. Still have some Now Foods Silymarin it does nothing but give me headaches.I am taking about 1.5 g over the day.

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I was taking solgar's milk thistle, and only taking the recommended amount and even less than that but I still had strange reactions to it. Have you experienced any side effects from NAC?


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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I was taking solgar's milk thistle, and only taking the recommended amount and even less than that but I still had strange reactions to it. Have you experienced any side effects from NAC?

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Btw, I just bought:

1) N-A-C

2) Alpha Lipoic Acid

3) Vitamin E

4) Selenium

Let's see how this goes against cystic acne.

Currently this is my current stack:

1) DIM

2) Calcium D-Glucarate

3) Probiotics

4) Digestive Enzymes

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Btw, I just bought:

1) N-A-C

2) Alpha Lipoic Acid

3) Vitamin E

4) Selenium

Let's see how this goes against cystic acne.

Currently this is my current stack:

1) DIM

2) Calcium D-Glucarate

3) Probiotics

4) Digestive Enzymes


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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