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I am cured. It was the diet after all.

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#61 Filipino

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Posted 02 June 2004 - 09:32 PM

QUOTE(katie_s @ Jun 2 2004, 06:01 PM)
QUOTE
Avoid starches, but I can guarantee you that your energy levels will eventually flag. Not worth it.


Not true at all. If you had NO carbs that would be the case, but fruit and veg are full of carbs.

I experienced a surprising boost in energy when I eliminated sugars and grains. I can actually leap out of bed awak in the morning- that's definitely a new thing for me.

True.... I have recently eliminated about 85% of all my intakes (mostly junk) and now Instead of asking myself for 5 more minutes to wake in the morning, I just leap you know just like you said....

#62 Sam The Man

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 01:12 PM

QUOTE(SweetJade1980 @ Jun 2 2004, 02:04 AM)
Sam,

Here's the original study to that article.


Yes, I found that abstract also. But I can't find the full text of that study.

You said that your testosterone levels are very high for a women. So in your case the cause for acne was clearly the very high levels of testosterone for your gender. Lower testosterone levels and the androgenic effects will diminsh. As I said, I know people that use AAS and some of them get acne, because of that. They don't have acne when they are not juicing, so obviously abnormally high testosterone levels alone can cause acne.

My testosterone levels are in the normal range for a man of my age. If my testosterone levels would decrease by 360%, I'd be a woman. Which wouldn't necessarely be a bad thing..... :whistle:

What I'm saying is that I don't believe that everybody who has acne is suffering from some kind of hormonal imbalance, that can be corrected with diet.
Who wants to be normal? Who wants normal results? We want to be exceptional. Exceptions confirm what is not normal

#63 SweetJade1980

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 08:53 PM

Sam,
Sorry about that. The best way to get the full text article is to go to your local college or library and print it out. I posts abstracts usually because most people here can't access the full texts anyway.

Also, I have a high level of androgens and it lowered through dietary means, but that's because it lowered my steriod hormones overall.

If someone with regular levels altered their diet in a similar or exact fashion, their hormones would also lower overall.

LOL, no you don't need a 360% reduction (compared to normal females), I don't know how much you would have to reduce yours ;-) What has your doctor said? What are your androgen hormone levels. Then again, maybe you do need a 360% reduction.

Bear in mind, at that time I was taking those two drugs (antiandrogen and DHT inhibitor) and they only lowered my levels down to a 2 ( I was still breaking out). Changing my diet, with no meds brought about a much greater reduction. Now, the normal amount of Free Testosterone for a female is 0 - 1.4, whereas for a male it's 4 - 26 (I was at a 10).

Oh, if I do find a full text though, I do try to post if its not too long. There's one article that isn't full text but it provides more details and really shows the difference between how a Low Glycemic Carb (Wheat) can affect your hormones more negatively than a High Glycemic Carb (rice), along with some other foods. That is an awesome study, it shows how regular people can alter their hormones through dietary intake, and I definately need to locate the full text. Anyway, here ya go:

Cornell-China study suggests rice-based diet
FOR RELEASE: March 25 1996
Contact: Susan Lang
Office: (607) 255-3613
E-mail: SSL4@cornell.edu

ITHACA, N.Y. -- A diet based on wheat foods such as pasta, bread and cereal may be contributing to this nation's soaring rates of diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and coronary heart disease, according to a new Cornell University study.

On the other hand, rice-based diets, and to a lesser extent fish and green vegetables, appear to lower the level of blood values associated with the risk of these diseases. These findings, published in the January 1996 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, come from the Cornell-China-Oxford Project on Nutrition, Health and Environment, a massive survey across the far reaches of China that investigates more diseases and dietary characteristics than any other study to date.

In 3,250 Chinese women living in widely dispersed rural counties, the researchers examined the relationship of various foods with a specific set of biochemical blood tests that have been shown to be commonly linked with diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and coronary heart disease -- otherwise collectively known as the "insulin resistance syndrome."

"We found that the pattern of blood biochemistries of people in the northern part of China who eat a predominantly wheat- based diet resemble those in people with insulin resistance," said Jeffrey Gates, who has a doctorate in health sciences and works in Cornell's Division of Nutritional Sciences; he collaborated with T. Colin Campbell, the Cornell biochemist and director of the China project, Banoo Parpia, Cornell research associate, and Chen Junshi of the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine in Beijing.

This pattern includes higher insulin, higher triglycerides, and lower sex hormone binding globulin (a measure of insulin resistance).

"The Chinese women in the south, on the other hand, eat a rice-based diet and have a pattern of blood values that would be considered low risk," Gates added.

In the past couple of decades, many studies have pointed to insulin as being a common factor linking such diverse disorders as high blood pressure, diabetes and coronary heart disease. Recent research also has discovered that sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a relatively unknown blood protein, is a reasonably good indicator of insulin resistance. Low levels of SHBG are consistently linked to high levels of insulin in the body. Sustained high levels of insulin are, in turn, associated with the development of the chronic diseases mentioned above.

The Cornell researchers, therefore, looked at SHBG, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, testosterone, glucose and 21 different food groups. Factors commonly associated with insulin resistance, such as meat consumption, smoking, and weight were controlled for in the analysis.

"Though other foods such as fish and green vegetables were associated with changes in blood parameters studied, the strong effects of rice and wheat on SHBG were remarkable and unexpected," Gates said. "Women in the northern, wheat- eating counties consistently had low HDL levels, high triglycerides, and low SHBG, all suggestive of insulin resistance. Evidently, rice and wheat can have significantly different effects on the important biochemical parameters we measured." Interestingly, both the rice and wheat consumed in these Chinese regions are semi-refined. Gates stressed, however, that while rice and wheat appear to make the biggest impact on SHBG and insulin, certain other foods in the Chinese meal also have an important effect on SHBG and insulin changes in the blood, and thus ultimately, on those diseases associated with insulin resistance.

Gates speculates that "the differing effects of wheat and rice on SHBG and insulin may be due to the difference in amylose content, a particular kind of starch." Other researchers have found that some rice varieties have higher amylose content than wheat; some rices, on the other hand, have comparable levels.

"Several recent studies have shown that starches with higher amylose content slow down glucose absorption and thus reduce the insulin response of the meal," Gates added. "Clearly, the effects of wheat or rice on insulin response must not be isolated from the important influence of other dietary and lifestyle factors such as fat and exercise. However, this study lends support to the idea that certain starches may play an important role in the development of insulin resistance and thus increase an individual's risk for diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease."
http://www.news.corn....wheat.ssl.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm....st_uids=8604665

SHBG is something that estrogen increases. Testosterone decreases this, and considering that SHBGs goal is to primarly bind to Free Testosterone and deactivate it (so it won't become DHT) I guess that makes sense. This is one of several ways that controlling your Insulin levels, among other elements, affect your hormones. You can have regular testosterone levels, the questions are how much of it is Free Testosterone and how sensitive to DHT are you.

So what kind of diet did you try again? What's the health history in your family?

Bye for now
These are not steps, but stages some people progress through when going from conventional to holistic medicine. Stage 2 is how I became 99%+ Clear, eliminated my dysmennorhea, significantly reduced my sebum & pore size, etc & is my predominant method.

Stage 1 (Treatment):
* (Daily) Isocare Skin Control Cleanser, Dream Products Customized Natural Face Lotion & Coppertone Sport Spray Sunscreen (mixed)
* (Sporadically) spot treat w/ anti-inflammatory (neosporin, hydrocortisone, salicylic acid) or a skin lightener (post-inflammatory pigmentation) to treat stubborn cystic/nodular acne that appears due to unknowingly or knowingly ingesting a food/ingredient that breaks me out (I do my best to avoid these foods). If you cover treated area w/ a bandaid, it makes product more effective.

Stage 2 (Prevention): "cheapest" method ~ Since Aug. 2002
* Follow a Gluten-Free, Trans-Fat Free, Dairy-Free and No Added Sugar diet for my Insulin Resistance/Hyperandrogenism (Silent Chronic Inflammatory Syndrome)
* Avoid ALL types of nuts and the Genus Prunus (almonds, plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, cherries), Bananas, Pineapples, Cottonseed oil, Artificial Sweetners.

Stage 3 (Correction):
* 1/18/08 Ultimate Colon Cleanse (30 day program)

Research:
* Developing functional foods for those with acne & other special needs (assuming there's a defficiency).
* Developing good & "safe" formulas for various hormonal issues for women. Correction stage may resolve this for some.

#64 SweetJade1980

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 09:39 PM

Sam,
Another thing they talk about for basically any health problem, and this includes Prostate problems (associated with DHT and bad estrogens), is that our diets lack fiber (we need at least 25 g/day). Vegetarians are 50% as likely to get cancer as non-vegetarians (that would be me), but what's interesting is that they eat loads more fiber and plenty of vegetables with cancer fighting potential (scientists are looking more into this...yeah). Yes vegetarians do get acne, and if they are loading up on the grains, particulary refined grains (or something else that they are intolerant to), that could be why. Anyway, here's what some articles say about this:


Vegetarian Food Goes to Jail
"The prison has two dining halls and two feeding lines with all food made in one kitchen. Breads and rolls are made in the prison bakery. Those 50 to 60% selecting the NEWSTART Program are fed a vegan diet, except for the weekend when desserts such as cakes or puddings with milk and eggs are brought in. These inmates receive no meat, fish, chicken, dairy products, eggs, or sugar with their weekday meals. Because of budget limitations, it was necessary to deviate from the vegan meal program on weekends.

"Yes. A Massachusetts study on male aging showed that men who had higher levels of SHBG (sex-hormone binding globulin) in their blood were rated by their wives as less aggressive and less domineering. SHBG is a protein that binds to testosterone and reduces its activity, which is generally a good thing. As it happens, high fiber diets boost SHBG."

"Anglen detailed some of the health improvements of the vegan inmates. He described how diabetics were able to rid themselves of medications, a good number saw their skin conditions improved, many lost excess weight, and most felt more energetic. ""
http://www.vegparadise.com/news18.html



"Effects of diet and exercise on insulin, sex hormone-binding globulin, and prostate-specific antigen.

Tymchuk CN, Tessler SB, Aronson WJ, Barnard RJ.

Department of Physiological Science, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles 90095-1527, USA.

A diet high in fat has been linked to prostate cancer, possibly through an influence on hormones. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) binds androgens and is regulated in part by insulin. Diet and exercise can modify insulin levels, potentially affecting SHBG and the biologically available levels of androgens. To determine the effects of a low-fat (< 10% of calories), high-fiber diet plus daily exercise on insulin, SHBG, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and serum lipids, we measured the levels of these factors in the serum of 27 obese men undergoing a three-week diet-and-exercise program. Insulin decreased from 222 +/- 30 to 126 +/- 21 pmol/l (p < 0.01), and SHBG increased from 18 +/- 2 to 25 +/- 3 nmol/l (p < 0.01). Body mass index decreased from 35 +/- 1.9 to 33.4 +/- 1.8 kg/m2 (p < 0.01). PSA levels were normal and did not change significantly, although in a small subset of men (n = 3) with slightly elevated PSA levels (> 2.5 ng/ml) all showed a decrease. The three-week diet-and-exercise intervention decreased insulin and lipid levels while increasing SHBG. The increase in SHBG would result in more testosterone being bound and, therefore, less of the androgen available to act on the prostate. The decrease in insulin might also decrease mitogenic activity in the prostate. The diet-and-exercise regimen did not have a significant impact on normal PSA levels. Although modest, these changes may be protective against the development of prostate cancer."
http://www.ncbi.nlm....st_uids=9770724

Of course with these studies, they are all the same they either just say Fiber (what kind?) or Wheat Bran. The problem there is that the type of fiber may very well affect how high or low your androgen levels are. Hopefully in the future, they'll figure that out to and put in a clincal study. ;-)
These are not steps, but stages some people progress through when going from conventional to holistic medicine. Stage 2 is how I became 99%+ Clear, eliminated my dysmennorhea, significantly reduced my sebum & pore size, etc & is my predominant method.

Stage 1 (Treatment):
* (Daily) Isocare Skin Control Cleanser, Dream Products Customized Natural Face Lotion & Coppertone Sport Spray Sunscreen (mixed)
* (Sporadically) spot treat w/ anti-inflammatory (neosporin, hydrocortisone, salicylic acid) or a skin lightener (post-inflammatory pigmentation) to treat stubborn cystic/nodular acne that appears due to unknowingly or knowingly ingesting a food/ingredient that breaks me out (I do my best to avoid these foods). If you cover treated area w/ a bandaid, it makes product more effective.

Stage 2 (Prevention): "cheapest" method ~ Since Aug. 2002
* Follow a Gluten-Free, Trans-Fat Free, Dairy-Free and No Added Sugar diet for my Insulin Resistance/Hyperandrogenism (Silent Chronic Inflammatory Syndrome)
* Avoid ALL types of nuts and the Genus Prunus (almonds, plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, cherries), Bananas, Pineapples, Cottonseed oil, Artificial Sweetners.

Stage 3 (Correction):
* 1/18/08 Ultimate Colon Cleanse (30 day program)

Research:
* Developing functional foods for those with acne & other special needs (assuming there's a defficiency).
* Developing good & "safe" formulas for various hormonal issues for women. Correction stage may resolve this for some.

#65 Sam The Man

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Posted 04 June 2004 - 09:03 AM

QUOTE(SweetJade1980 @ Jun 4 2004, 05:40 AM)
So what kind of diet did you try again?  What's the health history in your family?


I've been on a ketogenic diet. Basically about 30-50 grams of carbs a day. Mainly from vegetables, because they have fiber. About 300 grams of protein (fish, red meat and chicken) and about 160 to 200 grams of fat (mostly the fat from the meats and rapeseed oil). So I ate about 3000 kcal a day. Carbed up real high about every 10 days to fill the glycogen storages.

That's not of course my normal diet. Normally I eat more carbs around 300-400 grams a day. Pretty much oatmeal, bread (ryebread) and fruits and vegetables. Eggs, meat, fish, cottage cheese for protein. Fat comes from the protein sources and rapeseed and olive oils. That's pretty much it. smile.gif

About those testosterone levels, I can't remember them exactly. I'd have to get them tested, because I'm curious about them anyway. We looked them from the chart with the doctor (very nice looking woman, by the way.............) and they were in the normal range.

Testosterone has a lot of functions in the male body besides causing oily skin and baldness. Muscle mass, sex drive (don't have any use for that.....) and energy levels all decrease if testosterone levels decrease. So I understand that a person who suffers from acne would like to lower testosterone levels if that would help his skin condition, but a human male ( and woman to lesser degree) need testosterone to function properly. The sad fact is that for some people that "normal" level of test will cause unwanted androgenic effects with those good effects.

SweetJade if you find a full text of that study, it would be great. :dance:
Who wants to be normal? Who wants normal results? We want to be exceptional. Exceptions confirm what is not normal