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#1 no_other

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Posted 09 May 2005 - 08:56 PM

Anyone been prescribed naproxen? I got it from my family doctor, and he told me if it doesn't work in 8 weeks to come back and he'll prescribe me something else.

Does this work, if anyone has used it. Or am I just wasting my time, and should find a derma?

#2 cloudy

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 06:11 AM

Your doctor is either up-to-date and well-read, or watches Oprah. She apparently had a doctor onboard a week or two ago who advocated taking a baby aspirin or two to clear up skin.

I didn't see the program but had already found a few studies on using NSAIDs (Advil, aspirin) to combat acne inflammation. Interestingly, small amounts of systemic anti-inflammatories (like Naproxen) do seem to work.

I'd try it. So as not to waste time, I'd also take a look at the skin care regimens people use here. Find somone who sounds similar to you in background, skintype, age, acne etc. and see what they are using & how it's working.

I'm giving my daughter a baby aspirin a day now (in addition to better diet, B5 and zinc supplements) when she is extra stressed/has other reason's to trigger a break-out. So far so good but we haven't used it long enough to know much yet.

P.S. Stick to what the doc ordered--Naproxen--if you are a teenager. Aspirin has some rare but serious side effects for kids and teenagers.


#3 cashmira

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 09:02 AM

Please do some research on Naproxen...it was recently in the news in Canada as it has been linked to strokes etc (I know, as I was a former user of Naproxen and my doc took me off of it for this reason). It is an anti-inflammatory drug.

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#4 cloudy

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 09:24 AM

Well, yeah-- the FDA is requiring new, stronger warning for all the newer NSAIDS (anything except aspirin) and yanked the COX-2 inhibitors VIOXX and Bextra off the market due to concerns about strokes and heart attacks. The same warnings will apply to anything else over the counter--naproxyn, ibuprofens and ketoprofens etc. Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not an anti-inflammatory.

The good ole aspirin would be the best bet healthwise EXCEPT that it is not recommended for kids or teenagers ( Reye's syndrome). It also irritates many people's stomachs. I took a lot of aspirin when younger--can't take it anymore.

Anyway, compared to the possible adverse effects of Accutane or even antibiotics, the risk of taking small amounts of naproxen, ibuprofen etc for a few weeks are pretty limited. After all, the drugs will still be available over the counter.

#5 lexilex

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 07:34 PM

i'd be curious to see what happens. keep us updated.

you should definitely take the naproxen with food.


#6 noether

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 07:35 PM

What's the dose?

#7 cashmira

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 07:39 PM

QUOTE(cloudy @ May 10 2005, 04:24 PM)
Well, yeah-- the FDA is requiring new, stronger warning for all the newer NSAIDS (anything except aspirin) and yanked the COX-2 inhibitors VIOXX and Bextra off the market due to concerns about strokes and heart attacks. The same warnings will apply to anything else over the counter--naproxyn, ibuprofens and ketoprofens etc.  Tylenol (acetaminophen) is not an anti-inflammatory.   

The good ole aspirin would be the best bet healthwise EXCEPT that  it is not recommended for kids or teenagers ( Reye's syndrome). It also irritates many people's stomachs.  I took a lot of aspirin when younger--can't take it anymore.

Anyway, compared to the possible adverse effects of Accutane or even antibiotics, the risk of taking small amounts of naproxyn, ibuprofen etc for a few weeks are pretty limited.  After all, the drugs will still be available over the counter.

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Yup, all this goes to show you how important it is to do your own research, speak to your own professionals (docs, pharmacists, etc) and not trust everything you read online, particularly anecdotal accounts!

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#8 Debonaire

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 08:03 PM

Yeesh. You were prescribed Naproxen for your acne?

I got prescribed it because I have a slipped disc in my lower back. It's an anti-inflammatory, though... I don't suggest you take it for long periods of times or else you may end up with stomach ulcers. :/

#9 no_other

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 08:14 PM

Wow, I feel like an idiot. I was not prescribed Naproxen, someone in my family must have been, since it was in my mom's room. I looked at the bottle and thought it was mine, and came back to post that.

My prescription is Tetracycline. It's 500 MG. Anyone ever been prescribed this!?! I'm prescribed to take this 2 times daily, 1 pill a time.

I was talking to my mom earlier, and she said I was pessimistic about it all, because I told her this probably won't work. I'm hoping it does though, my doc said to try this, and then in 8 weeks if I'm not where I want to be, then come back and he'll get me something new. I'm hoping this will work since it's a doc telling me what to do, but still worried it won't.



#10 cloudy

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 09:44 PM

Tetracycline is an antibiotic & one of the first oral medications doctors try on acne. Trouble is, acne tends to return when you stop taking antibiotics because they only deal with the inflammation, not with extra sebum production or blocked pores. While you are on the antibiotics, take a look at your skin care regimen.

Tetracycline also makes you sensitive to sun-- be careful when outside.

Good luck.


P.S. Noether, Cashmira et al: Naproxen for acne isn't as farfetched as it sounds at first: if you Google/check Medline/for NSAIDS and acne (ibuprofen and acne etc.), you'll find a couple of studies.

#11 cashmira

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 09:41 AM

QUOTE(cloudy @ May 11 2005, 04:44 AM)

P.S. Noether, Cashmira et al:  Naproxen for acne isn't as farfetched as it sounds at first: if you Google/check Medline/for NSAIDS and acne (ibuprofen and acne etc.), you'll find a couple of studies.

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Cloudy, I'm married to (20 years this year!) a career research scientist and grew up with a father who was also a research scientist...it's good to be WELL informed and base opinions on MANY studies (and SUPERIOR studies at that).

Cheers,

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#12 cloudy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 09:46 AM

I quite agree. This is a good place to start:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....1.chapter.24841

P.S. This is link to the FDA warning about NSAIDS:
http://www.fda.gov/c...S_NSAIDsHCP.htm

And to further prove your point about doing one's own research/the importance of good science:

"Last December, the FDA and the National Institutes of Health issued a warning about naproxen, the active ingredient in Bayer's Aleve and Roche's Naprosyn, saying there was a potential increased risk for heart attack and stroke for patients on the drug. The results came from a trial called Adapt, testing naproxen and Celebrex as preventatives for Alzheimer's disease. The statement warned of a 50% increase in cardiovascular events with naproxen.

Top cardiologists almost instantly pounced on the trial. Naproxen was thought to be slightly protective for the heart, like a weak aspirin. Moreover, it had been shown to cause fewer cardiovascular problems than Vioxx. A similar study hinted that naproxen had a heart advantage over an experimental Cox-2 drug from Novartis.

Today, Constantine Lyketsos from Johns Hopkins Hospital finally presented the results from Adapt. There had been a slight evidence of a risk with naproxen, but the study was stopped because data available from studies indicating a risk with Celebrex made it difficult to convince medical institutions to continue the study. Also, there had been a problem keeping patients on their medicines. "This issue was one more of practicalities than of our internal data," Lykos said.

Tom Fleming, a statistician from the University of Washington, criticized the Adapt investigators for allowing awareness of efficacy data that should have only been available on a separate safety committee.

Another panel member, Steven Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic, likened releasing a warning on naproxen to yelling "fire" in a crowded auditorium. He said he hoped that the medical community could learn from the experience. "It caused a panic that was unnecessary," Nissen said, "and it shouldn't have happened, and I hope it doesn't happen again."

It's still possible that naproxen might have a slight heart risk--some members of the panel are arguing such a risk exists for many painkillers; it's one of the biggest debates for the FDA panel. But many experts seem to think the drug is fairly safe. The FDA's naproxen warning may go down in history as an unnecessary drug scare. "

The article was published in Forbes in February.

#13 UK_Guy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:38 PM

I've been noticing some reduction in inflammed lessions since taking 400mg Ibruprofen (an OTC NSAID) 3 to 4 times a day for the last week or so, afterI read some studies. However, I've heard that taking this dose of ibruprofen regularly may not be good for my stomach, would Naproxen be safer and at what daily dosage?




QUOTE(cloudy @ May 11 2005, 04:46 PM)
I quite agree. This is a good place to start.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....1.chapter.24841

P.S. This is link to the FDA warning about NSAIDS:
http://www.fda.gov/c...S_NSAIDsHCP.htm

And to further prove your point about doing one's own research/the importance of good science:

"Last December, the FDA and the National Institutes of Health issued a warning about naproxen, the active ingredient in Bayer's Aleve and Roche's Naprosyn, saying there was a potential increased risk for heart attack and stroke for patients on the drug. The results came from a trial called Adapt, testing naproxen and Celebrex as preventatives for Alzheimer's disease. The statement warned of a 50% increase in cardiovascular events with naproxen.

Top cardiologists almost instantly pounced on the trial. Naproxen was thought to be slightly protective for the heart, like a weak aspirin. Moreover, it had been shown to cause fewer cardiovascular problems than Vioxx. A similar study hinted that naproxen had a heart advantage over an experimental Cox-2 drug from Novartis.

Today, Constantine Lyketsos from Johns Hopkins Hospital finally presented the results from Adapt. There had been a slight evidence of a risk with naproxen, but the study was stopped because data available from studies indicating a risk with Celebrex made it difficult to convince medical institutions to continue the study. Also, there had been a problem keeping patients on their medicines. "This issue was one more of practicalities than of our internal data," Lykos said.

Tom Fleming, a statistician from the University of Washington, criticized the Adapt investigators for allowing awareness of efficacy data that should have only been available on a separate safety committee.

Another panel member, Steven Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic, likened releasing a warning on naproxen to yelling "fire" in a crowded auditorium. He said he hoped that the medical community could learn from the experience. "It caused a panic that was unnecessary," Nissen said, "and it shouldn't have happened, and I hope it doesn't happen again."

It's still possible that naproxen might have a slight heart risk--some members of the panel are arguing such a risk exists for many painkillers; it's one of the biggest debates for the FDA panel. But many experts seem to think the drug is fairly safe. The FDA's naproxen warning may go down in history as an unnecessary drug scare. "

The article was published in Forbes in February.

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#14 cashmira

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 04:52 PM

QUOTE(UK_Guy @ May 11 2005, 10:38 PM)
I've been noticing some reduction in inflammed lessions since taking 400mg Ibruprofen (an OTC NSAID) 3 to 4 times a day for the last week or so, afterI read some studies. However, I've heard that taking this dose of ibruprofen regularly may not be good for my stomach, would Naproxen be safer and at what daily dosage?

View Post



Speak to your pharmacist and your doctor: your BEST sources for information like this (I particularly like my own pharmacist for up-to-date drug info...she is the *best*); message boards such as this are good for some things, but in my own opinion, of little value when it comes to answering questions such as this one.

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#15 cloudy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 04:54 PM

I'm not a doctor so don't take this as medical advice. :-) As a fellow poster, I think that much ibuprofen is way, way too much & will irritate your stomach. IF you're an adult and not allergic to aspirin, a baby aspirin (85 mg or so) ONCE a day would seem to be your safest bet. And that's all that's supposed to be needed.

Aleve/Naproxen is not any safer than ibuprofen.

Aspirin is the original wonder drug. Lots of people have been taking (small amounts) on a long term basis so how it affects people is pretty much known. It DOES irritate the stomach lining (you could get an enterocoated version) but so do all the newer NSAIDS too.

In general, I'd try ibuprofen etc. on a temporary basis (10 days or less) when you have a number of really painful cysts forming.

#16 cloudy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 05:09 PM

Cashmira,
If you follow the first link I posted, you'll see that there is a dearth of reliable studies regarding even the mainstay acne drugs (like isotretinoin). The researchers (who looked at over 4,000 studies) were surprised at how few well-designed and well-controlled studies they found. Read the conclusion--it's quite interesting.
Best,
C.

#17 LoganRuns

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 05:37 AM

QUOTE(UK_Guy @ May 11 2005, 02:38 PM)
I've been noticing some reduction in inflammed lessions since taking 400mg Ibruprofen (an OTC NSAID) 3 to 4 times a day for the last week or so, afterI read some studies. However, I've heard that taking this dose of ibruprofen regularly may not be good for my stomach, would Naproxen be safer and at what daily dosage?

View Post



Naproxen (Aleve) is relatively the safest OTC COX-2 inhibitor, compared to aspirin, acetominophen (toxic!) and ibuprofen.

However, going down this road needs to be a comprehensive approach for safety. There are other inflammatory pathways in the body that need to be inhibited and inhibiting COX-2 enzyme alone overexpresses another inflammatory pathway which is why the high rate of cardiovascular complications.

Logan


#18 UK_Guy

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 07:29 AM

QUOTE(LoganRuns @ May 12 2005, 12:37 PM)
Naproxen (Aleve) is relatively the safest OTC COX-2 inhibitor, compared to aspirin, acetominophen (toxic!) and ibuprofen.


What's acetominophen? I've never heard of this, don't think you can get this in the UK

QUOTE(LoganRuns @ May 12 2005, 12:37 PM)
However, going down this road needs to be a comprehensive approach for safety.  There are other inflammatory pathways in the body that need to be inhibited and inhibiting COX-2 enzyme alone overexpresses another inflammatory pathway which is why the high rate of cardiovascular complications.


Okay, sounds like unless only taking minimal amounts of an NSAID everyday (child's asprin) or more, but only occasaionally (i.e. during a bad breakout) that taking NSAIDs regularly should only be done under medical supervision



#19 beentheredonethat

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 07:34 AM

QUOTE
What's acetominophen?

Most commonly known as Tylenol. Apparently in the UK it is called paracetamol instead of acetaminophen as it's called in the US.
QUOTE
Okay, sounds like unless only taking minimal amounts of an NSAID everyday (child's asprin) or more, but only occasaionally (i.e. during a bad breakout) that taking NSAIDs regularly should only be done under medical supervision

True. These drugs are approved for over the counter use with the expectation that they are used only occasionally. You should not take any of the OTC painkiller/anti-inflammatories regularly (every day) without consulting a physician.

#20 cloudy

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 07:38 AM

Acetaminophen is known as paracetamol ( e.g. Panadol) in Europe. It does not have anti-inflammatory properties, i.e. wouldn't help in any case.

The original poster thought he'd been prescribed Naproxen by his doc which I thought was rather avant garde but interesting.