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Chronic Diarrhea

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I need some help. For the last couple months, I have had chronic diarrhea. I got to the bathroom a lot and have small little, green, smelly, mucousy stools (usually with whole, undigested foods). (Sorry for the image) I put my hand in the toilet and felt my stool and it feels very mucousy. It's defintiely diarrhea. I need help. Here are some possible causes:

-Parasites (it started shortly after using tinctures; but I stopped them and it persisted)

-Supplements (i stopped all of them yesterday)

- Food Intolerance (i seem to be having the same basic structure for every meal and I am really scared about a food intolerance)

-Too much fiber/veggies (I have been eating 85% vegetable or more

It's really annoying, because I feel like I am depleting myself of electroyetes and I thought that improving my diet would better my stools. Please help!!!

P.S. I haven't changed much since I got dirrahea in terms of food.

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I put my hand in the toilet and felt my stool and it feels very mucousy.

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I need some help. For the last couple months, I have had chronic diarrhea. I got to the bathroom a lot and have small little, green, smelly, mucousy stools (usually with whole, undigested foods). (Sorry for the image) I put my hand in the toilet and felt my stool and it feels very mucousy. It's defintiely diarrhea. I need help. Here are some possible causes:

-Parasites (it started shortly after using tinctures; but I stopped them and it persisted)

-Supplements (i stopped all of them yesterday)

- Food Intolerance (i seem to be having the same basic structure for every meal and I am really scared about a food intolerance)

-Too much fiber/veggies (I have been eating 85% vegetable or more

It's really annoying, because I feel like I am depleting myself of electroyetes and I thought that improving my diet would better my stools. Please help!!!

P.S. I haven't changed much since I got dirrahea in terms of food.

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Hey you =)

Do you remember around when it started and around that time what you had changed in your diet? More grains or less grains? More or less vegetables, etc? When you say vegetables, what kinds exactly are you eating?

I went through an IBS episode and basically it was because I wasn't getting enough fiber in my diet. Yet I was experiencing spasms, cramps, and noisy stomach, along with the D, are you experiencing other signs of IBS? What I had to do was start taking fiber and I just chose Benefiber (soluble fiber), but I think you may be getting enough soluble fiber and liquid, but perhaps you aren't getting enough insoluble (adds bulk).

To remedy this I think you would want to up your current "safe" grain intake to more than once a day. Or consume (flax seed or) psyllium husks to boost your insoluble fiber. Although I'm a bit confused because you are getting some insoluble from your grains and nuts (and now lentils), but perhaps it's nothing compared to what you get in soluble fiber that your pulling from your vegetable intake, since it is 85% of what you consume.

Ahh, just did some digging and nuts & beans are considered insoluble as well as most vegetables, and well to further confuse things, some foods have both soluble and insoluble but appear to be classified based on what they have the most of. In which case perhaps these charts may help you figure out what type of fiber you are getting the most of (then increase what you are lacking):

What are Dietary Fibers

Most dietary fibers are carbohydrates, but they are not

digestible. The human body lacks the enzymes needed to

breakdown dietary fibers for absorption. As a result, dietary

fibers reach the lower intestine intact. Dietary fibers include

many substances such as cellulose, hemicellulose, gums,

pectins, lignins, mucilages, and tannins.

In general, dietary fibers are divided into two basic types:

insoluble fi bers and soluble fi bers. Both types of fi ber are

important for good health. Insoluble fibers are found in foods

such as wheat bran, corn bran, whole grain breads and cereals,

and vegetables. Insoluble fibers help with intestinal function.

Insoluble fibers absorb water and swell up in the intestine,

resulting in a larger softer stool that moves through the intestine

easier and faster. Soluble fi bers are found in some fruits, oats,

barley, and legumes. Soluble fi bers form a gel when water is

added to them. This contributes to a feeling of fullness in the

stomach. Soluble fi bers slow down the rate food leaves the

stomach and some nutrients are absorbed. Soluble fi bers also

help control blood glucose and blood cholesterol levels.

osuextra.okstate.edu/pdfs/T-3138web.pdf 

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