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If Acne Was Caused By Diet Why Would It Only Start At Puberty?


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#61 alternativista

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 06:05 AM

Alternatvista, your article says nothing about what starts the inflammation cycle. Without androgenic action on the pilosebaceous unit, the necessary events for the inflammation specifically in the pore that create the acne pustule cannot take place. You do not have to have "oily" skin to have just enough androgenic action to start the cycle which does result in inflammation near the end of the chain. Many people with seemingly dry skin on the surface still get blockages underneath the skin in cyst-like form. Have you ever had a stage four acne cyst excavated by a doctor? I have. Guess what, there is always a sebum pore blockage deep in the skin. Yet I have "dry" skin on the surface. 
 
There are cysts that do not have a pore blockage. But definitions are important. What differentiates acne from similar skin conditions is the pore blockage. If there is no pore blockage, then it's not acne you're not looking at. 
 
If you could possibly have ZERO androgenic action and ZERO sebum production, then you would not get acne. However even people with dry skin do not have zero androgens and nor do they have zero sebum. EVERY adult out there has some sebum. You don't need a lot to create the pore blockage that leads to an acne pustule.
 
This is why acne does start during and/or after puberty, because once puberty activates the hormones those hormones never completely go away, and typically you will always have more hormones after puberty than before. So you're way more likely as a 40 year old to have acne than a 4 year old purely based on your hormonal levels. 
 
Tons of hormonal changes also occur later in life even if you live a great healthy stress-free life. Menopause is just one great example. In some women, the testosterone/estrogen ratio is altered in favor of testosterone. This can even happen in perimenopause. No wonder some middle aged women start getting acne out of the blue. 
 
Also a huge point is that you are affecting your hormones every day by your lifestyle and what you eat. You may think it's all about inflammation, and it partially is. But you are modifying your hormones (including insulin/glucose) with every "anti-inflammatory" step you take. To say that it's initiated by inflammation is somewhat disingenuous as you can be as inflamed as you want, but if you had zero androgenic action and zero sebum you simply could not form the pore blockage that leads to acne. We can shut down the acne cycle much quicker by changing the hormones (major: insulin, minor: testosterone) than trying to address all the modalities of skin inflammation that are preceded by hormonal events. As most traditional acne treatments are either anti-bacterial or anti-inflammatory, certainly inflammation is a key step. But if your anti-inflammatory treatments are in no way affecting the internal hormonal events (e.g. something like benzoyl peroxide), your chances of eliminating acne are slim at best. Of course if you can do BOTH, more power to everyone. 
 
You highlighted stress. Even the most stressed out four year old does not have acne. I have worked with many troubled kids with terrible lives, mental disorders, high amounts of stress, abuse. They don't have pustular acne in the prepubescent stage. The whole cascade of hormones simply aren't in place for the particular type of acne to develop. Studies of girls that were considered premenarchial still showed hormone changes that indicated internal puberty changes before the other visible changes came about. There was one study that said that acne can precede other signs of puberty such as pubic hair and breast development--they determined puberty had happened by measuring hormone levels. 
 
That said, I also feel that we are agreeing in some ways but describing the problem differently. Even stress is largely a hormonally involved event. Maybe if we really really stressed out a four year old and gave them full blown type 2 diabetes (insulin problems) and stimulated androgens through weight lifting and dairy consumption, we could cause acne without the markers for puberty necessarily being in place. But to say that's happening because of inflammation only without the help of hormones is a bit silly. 
 
I'm also curious if you even personally have acne as traditionally defined, as you seem to report "reactions" from time to time that do not sound like acne at all. For example, how was your MSM-induced acne different from your typical acne? Do you truly think the MSM-induced "acne" was even acne?



I don't think it's all about inflammation and of course hormones are involved and you are affecting your hormones with diet. I don't know why you are telling me this. I've only said so a million times.

And I don't believe the MSM issue was true acne just like I don't believe my cystic acne caused by a delayed response to a food is true acne. Also wonder if the breakouts some women experience with their menstual cycle is true acne. By true acne I mean the process they tell us takes weeks to occur
Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#62 dscully

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 08:11 AM

Some people want to give up on the diet thing, and that's fine with me. As for me, I'm going to go to the pool with no makeup on. Obviously people who have figured out the diet/acne link are the winners in this situation. I don't really care if people call me nuts, say my diet is ludicrous or rubbish, or othersuch nonsense. My skin looks great. If it's all an elaborate coincidence and has nothing to do with my radical and sudden diet change, then... just kidding. Of course it was my diet change. UUUUUGH. I'm done.



Alternatvista, your article says nothing about what starts the inflammation cycle. Without androgenic action on the pilosebaceous unit, the necessary events for the inflammation specifically in the pore that create the acne pustule cannot take place. You do not have to have "oily" skin to have just enough androgenic action to start the cycle which does result in inflammation near the end of the chain. Many people with seemingly dry skin on the surface still get blockages underneath the skin in cyst-like form. Have you ever had a stage four acne cyst excavated by a doctor? I have. Guess what, there is always a sebum pore blockage deep in the skin. Yet I have "dry" skin on the surface. 
 
There are cysts that do not have a pore blockage. But definitions are important. What differentiates acne from similar skin conditions is the pore blockage. If there is no pore blockage, then it's not acne you're not looking at. 
 
If you could possibly have ZERO androgenic action and ZERO sebum production, then you would not get acne. However even people with dry skin do not have zero androgens and nor do they have zero sebum. EVERY adult out there has some sebum. You don't need a lot to create the pore blockage that leads to an acne pustule.
 
This is why acne does start during and/or after puberty, because once puberty activates the hormones those hormones never completely go away, and typically you will always have more hormones after puberty than before. So you're way more likely as a 40 year old to have acne than a 4 year old purely based on your hormonal levels. 
 
Tons of hormonal changes also occur later in life even if you live a great healthy stress-free life. Menopause is just one great example. In some women, the testosterone/estrogen ratio is altered in favor of testosterone. This can even happen in perimenopause. No wonder some middle aged women start getting acne out of the blue. 
 
Also a huge point is that you are affecting your hormones every day by your lifestyle and what you eat. You may think it's all about inflammation, and it partially is. But you are modifying your hormones (including insulin/glucose) with every "anti-inflammatory" step you take. To say that it's initiated by inflammation is somewhat disingenuous as you can be as inflamed as you want, but if you had zero androgenic action and zero sebum you simply could not form the pore blockage that leads to acne. We can shut down the acne cycle much quicker by changing the hormones (major: insulin, minor: testosterone) than trying to address all the modalities of skin inflammation that are preceded by hormonal events. As most traditional acne treatments are either anti-bacterial or anti-inflammatory, certainly inflammation is a key step. But if your anti-inflammatory treatments are in no way affecting the internal hormonal events (e.g. something like benzoyl peroxide), your chances of eliminating acne are slim at best. Of course if you can do BOTH, more power to everyone. 
 
You highlighted stress. Even the most stressed out four year old does not have acne. I have worked with many troubled kids with terrible lives, mental disorders, high amounts of stress, abuse. They don't have pustular acne in the prepubescent stage. The whole cascade of hormones simply aren't in place for the particular type of acne to develop. Studies of girls that were considered premenarchial still showed hormone changes that indicated internal puberty changes before the other visible changes came about. There was one study that said that acne can precede other signs of puberty such as pubic hair and breast development--they determined puberty had happened by measuring hormone levels. 
 
That said, I also feel that we are agreeing in some ways but describing the problem differently. Even stress is largely a hormonally involved event. Maybe if we really really stressed out a four year old and gave them full blown type 2 diabetes (insulin problems) and stimulated androgens through weight lifting and dairy consumption, we could cause acne without the markers for puberty necessarily being in place. But to say that's happening because of inflammation only without the help of hormones is a bit silly. 
 
I'm also curious if you even personally have acne as traditionally defined, as you seem to report "reactions" from time to time that do not sound like acne at all. For example, how was your MSM-induced acne different from your typical acne? Do you truly think the MSM-induced "acne" was even acne?



I don't think it's all about inflammation and of course hormones are involved and you are affecting your hormones with diet. I don't know why you are telling me this. I've only said so a million times.

And I don't believe the MSM issue was true acne just like I don't believe my cystic acne caused by a delayed response to a food is true acne. Also wonder if the breakouts some women experience with their menstual cycle is true acne. By true acne I mean the process they tell us takes weeks to occur

My acne doesn't take weeks to occur if I have it. I've always speculated that none of it is true acne. If I had a glass of milk, my skin would start to be tight and irritated and tomorrow I would have something going on on my chin. I'm wary of using the word allergy, but if there was an allergy to sugar, I would definitely have it. When I do have true acne, it goes away very quickly, and is just a small clogged pore. It's rarely inflamed like the reaction acne I get. I have no idea what's what, just that I don't want it on my face. That's why I'm so nuts about my food.


Suffered from acne as a young adult that went into remission when put on hormonal birth control. Went off the HBC around age 22 and the acne returned with a vengeance (along with a host of other hormonal complaints). 100% clear with a modified diet that excludes dairy, sugars, grains, citrus and cured meats and emphasizes whole food-based nutrition from both plant and animal sources, most notably organ meats like liver and juiced whole vegetables. I have included a recipe for the most helpful juice I have come up with for skin complaints. I drink it every day, and it is invaluable for acne due to the large amounts of vitamin A (carotenoids) from both the carrots and beets. It also helps improve your coloring if you are very fair, giving you a pinkish, more radiant look (not orange. Don't worry!).

 

Magic Juice

 

In a juicer, combine:

 

5-6 carrots

1 medium beet

2-3 stalks of celery

1 small apple (Green is preferred. Omit if you are very sugar-sensitive)

1 small (1inch) piece of ginger (optional, but good for digestion)

 

This makes a variable amount of juice depending on the size of the vegetables you use.

Drink this throughout the morning until it's gone. Store in the fridge not longer than one day.

Having perfectly clear skin on my wedding day was worth all the headache and effort of figuring out how diet affects acne!

10253792_10152330899888950_7455033623381
 


#63 alternativista

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:23 PM

Some people want to give up on the diet thing, and that's fine with me. As for me, I'm going to go to the pool with no makeup on. Obviously people who have figured out the diet/acne link are the winners in this situation. I don't really care if people call me nuts, say my diet is ludicrous or rubbish, or othersuch nonsense. My skin looks great. If it's all an elaborate coincidence and has nothing to do with my radical and sudden diet change, then... just kidding. Of course it was my diet change. UUUUUGH. I'm done.



Alternatvista, your article says nothing about what starts the inflammation cycle. Without androgenic action on the pilosebaceous unit, the necessary events for the inflammation specifically in the pore that create the acne pustule cannot take place. You do not have to have "oily" skin to have just enough androgenic action to start the cycle which does result in inflammation near the end of the chain. Many people with seemingly dry skin on the surface still get blockages underneath the skin in cyst-like form. Have you ever had a stage four acne cyst excavated by a doctor? I have. Guess what, there is always a sebum pore blockage deep in the skin. Yet I have "dry" skin on the surface. 
 
There are cysts that do not have a pore blockage. But definitions are important. What differentiates acne from similar skin conditions is the pore blockage. If there is no pore blockage, then it's not acne you're not looking at. 
 
If you could possibly have ZERO androgenic action and ZERO sebum production, then you would not get acne. However even people with dry skin do not have zero androgens and nor do they have zero sebum. EVERY adult out there has some sebum. You don't need a lot to create the pore blockage that leads to an acne pustule.
 
This is why acne does start during and/or after puberty, because once puberty activates the hormones those hormones never completely go away, and typically you will always have more hormones after puberty than before. So you're way more likely as a 40 year old to have acne than a 4 year old purely based on your hormonal levels. 
 
Tons of hormonal changes also occur later in life even if you live a great healthy stress-free life. Menopause is just one great example. In some women, the testosterone/estrogen ratio is altered in favor of testosterone. This can even happen in perimenopause. No wonder some middle aged women start getting acne out of the blue. 
 
Also a huge point is that you are affecting your hormones every day by your lifestyle and what you eat. You may think it's all about inflammation, and it partially is. But you are modifying your hormones (including insulin/glucose) with every "anti-inflammatory" step you take. To say that it's initiated by inflammation is somewhat disingenuous as you can be as inflamed as you want, but if you had zero androgenic action and zero sebum you simply could not form the pore blockage that leads to acne. We can shut down the acne cycle much quicker by changing the hormones (major: insulin, minor: testosterone) than trying to address all the modalities of skin inflammation that are preceded by hormonal events. As most traditional acne treatments are either anti-bacterial or anti-inflammatory, certainly inflammation is a key step. But if your anti-inflammatory treatments are in no way affecting the internal hormonal events (e.g. something like benzoyl peroxide), your chances of eliminating acne are slim at best. Of course if you can do BOTH, more power to everyone. 
 
You highlighted stress. Even the most stressed out four year old does not have acne. I have worked with many troubled kids with terrible lives, mental disorders, high amounts of stress, abuse. They don't have pustular acne in the prepubescent stage. The whole cascade of hormones simply aren't in place for the particular type of acne to develop. Studies of girls that were considered premenarchial still showed hormone changes that indicated internal puberty changes before the other visible changes came about. There was one study that said that acne can precede other signs of puberty such as pubic hair and breast development--they determined puberty had happened by measuring hormone levels. 
 
That said, I also feel that we are agreeing in some ways but describing the problem differently. Even stress is largely a hormonally involved event. Maybe if we really really stressed out a four year old and gave them full blown type 2 diabetes (insulin problems) and stimulated androgens through weight lifting and dairy consumption, we could cause acne without the markers for puberty necessarily being in place. But to say that's happening because of inflammation only without the help of hormones is a bit silly. 
 
I'm also curious if you even personally have acne as traditionally defined, as you seem to report "reactions" from time to time that do not sound like acne at all. For example, how was your MSM-induced acne different from your typical acne? Do you truly think the MSM-induced "acne" was even acne?

I don't think it's all about inflammation and of course hormones are involved and you are affecting your hormones with diet. I don't know why you are telling me this. I've only said so a million times.
And I don't believe the MSM issue was true acne just like I don't believe my cystic acne caused by a delayed response to a food is true acne. Also wonder if the breakouts some women experience with their menstual cycle is true acne. By true acne I mean the process they tell us takes weeks to occur
My acne doesn't take weeks to occur if I have it. I've always speculated that none of it is true acne. If I had a glass of milk, my skin would start to be tight and irritated and tomorrow I would have something going on on my chin. I'm wary of using the word allergy, but if there was an allergy to sugar, I would definitely have it. When I do have true acne, it goes away very quickly, and is just a small clogged pore. It's rarely inflamed like the reaction acne I get. I have no idea what's what, just that I don't want it on my face. That's why I'm so nuts about my food.
There such a thing as fructose malabsorption. And tight and irritated is exactly how my skin feels now. I quit all the suspect foods and supplements and my skin got better, still tight, but clear. Then day before yesterday I decided to try adding back in my homemade water kefir and it's broken out a bit again. So it's my main suspect.
The probiotics consume the glucose and leave behind the fructose. I had been using coconut sugar which has a lower fructose ratio and my kefir tasted sour. When I ran out, I used a raw cane sugar and my kefir tasted sweet, so, more fructose. The switch migh have coincided with this irritation. I'm not sure. I'd never been aware of an is due with fructose before. But bright light exposure effects it and I have been estivating indoors as much as possible this summer cuz I don't like the heat.

Do you notice if your skin gets less elastic as well?. I've noticed the skin on the back of my hands and eyelids aren't snapping back like they should.

Edited by alternativista, 12 August 2014 - 03:26 PM.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#64 dscully

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:33 PM

Some people want to give up on the diet thing, and that's fine with me. As for me, I'm going to go to the pool with no makeup on. Obviously people who have figured out the diet/acne link are the winners in this situation. I don't really care if people call me nuts, say my diet is ludicrous or rubbish, or othersuch nonsense. My skin looks great. If it's all an elaborate coincidence and has nothing to do with my radical and sudden diet change, then... just kidding. Of course it was my diet change. UUUUUGH. I'm done.

 



Alternatvista, your article says nothing about what starts the inflammation cycle. Without androgenic action on the pilosebaceous unit, the necessary events for the inflammation specifically in the pore that create the acne pustule cannot take place. You do not have to have "oily" skin to have just enough androgenic action to start the cycle which does result in inflammation near the end of the chain. Many people with seemingly dry skin on the surface still get blockages underneath the skin in cyst-like form. Have you ever had a stage four acne cyst excavated by a doctor? I have. Guess what, there is always a sebum pore blockage deep in the skin. Yet I have "dry" skin on the surface. 
 
There are cysts that do not have a pore blockage. But definitions are important. What differentiates acne from similar skin conditions is the pore blockage. If there is no pore blockage, then it's not acne you're not looking at. 
 
If you could possibly have ZERO androgenic action and ZERO sebum production, then you would not get acne. However even people with dry skin do not have zero androgens and nor do they have zero sebum. EVERY adult out there has some sebum. You don't need a lot to create the pore blockage that leads to an acne pustule.
 
This is why acne does start during and/or after puberty, because once puberty activates the hormones those hormones never completely go away, and typically you will always have more hormones after puberty than before. So you're way more likely as a 40 year old to have acne than a 4 year old purely based on your hormonal levels. 
 
Tons of hormonal changes also occur later in life even if you live a great healthy stress-free life. Menopause is just one great example. In some women, the testosterone/estrogen ratio is altered in favor of testosterone. This can even happen in perimenopause. No wonder some middle aged women start getting acne out of the blue. 
 
Also a huge point is that you are affecting your hormones every day by your lifestyle and what you eat. You may think it's all about inflammation, and it partially is. But you are modifying your hormones (including insulin/glucose) with every "anti-inflammatory" step you take. To say that it's initiated by inflammation is somewhat disingenuous as you can be as inflamed as you want, but if you had zero androgenic action and zero sebum you simply could not form the pore blockage that leads to acne. We can shut down the acne cycle much quicker by changing the hormones (major: insulin, minor: testosterone) than trying to address all the modalities of skin inflammation that are preceded by hormonal events. As most traditional acne treatments are either anti-bacterial or anti-inflammatory, certainly inflammation is a key step. But if your anti-inflammatory treatments are in no way affecting the internal hormonal events (e.g. something like benzoyl peroxide), your chances of eliminating acne are slim at best. Of course if you can do BOTH, more power to everyone. 
 
You highlighted stress. Even the most stressed out four year old does not have acne. I have worked with many troubled kids with terrible lives, mental disorders, high amounts of stress, abuse. They don't have pustular acne in the prepubescent stage. The whole cascade of hormones simply aren't in place for the particular type of acne to develop. Studies of girls that were considered premenarchial still showed hormone changes that indicated internal puberty changes before the other visible changes came about. There was one study that said that acne can precede other signs of puberty such as pubic hair and breast development--they determined puberty had happened by measuring hormone levels. 
 
That said, I also feel that we are agreeing in some ways but describing the problem differently. Even stress is largely a hormonally involved event. Maybe if we really really stressed out a four year old and gave them full blown type 2 diabetes (insulin problems) and stimulated androgens through weight lifting and dairy consumption, we could cause acne without the markers for puberty necessarily being in place. But to say that's happening because of inflammation only without the help of hormones is a bit silly. 
 
I'm also curious if you even personally have acne as traditionally defined, as you seem to report "reactions" from time to time that do not sound like acne at all. For example, how was your MSM-induced acne different from your typical acne? Do you truly think the MSM-induced "acne" was even acne?

I don't think it's all about inflammation and of course hormones are involved and you are affecting your hormones with diet. I don't know why you are telling me this. I've only said so a million times.
And I don't believe the MSM issue was true acne just like I don't believe my cystic acne caused by a delayed response to a food is true acne. Also wonder if the breakouts some women experience with their menstual cycle is true acne. By true acne I mean the process they tell us takes weeks to occur
My acne doesn't take weeks to occur if I have it. I've always speculated that none of it is true acne. If I had a glass of milk, my skin would start to be tight and irritated and tomorrow I would have something going on on my chin. I'm wary of using the word allergy, but if there was an allergy to sugar, I would definitely have it. When I do have true acne, it goes away very quickly, and is just a small clogged pore. It's rarely inflamed like the reaction acne I get. I have no idea what's what, just that I don't want it on my face. That's why I'm so nuts about my food.
There such a thing as fructose malabsorption. And tight and irritated is exactly how my skin feels now. I quit all the suspect foods and supplements and my skin got better, still tight, but clear. Then day before yesterday I decided to try adding back in my homemade water kefir and it's broken out a bit again. So it's my main suspect.
The probiotics consume the glucose and leave behind the fructose. I had been using coconut sugar which has a lower fructose ratio and my kefir tasted sour. When I ran out, I used a raw cane sugar and my kefir tasted sweet, so, more fructose. The switch migh have coincided with this irritation. I'm not sure. I'd never been aware of an is due with fructose before. But bright light exposure effects it and I have been estivating indoors as much as possible this summer cuz I don't like the heat.

Do you notice if your skin gets less elastic as well?. I've noticed the skin on the back of my hands and eyelids aren't snapping back like they should.

My skin becomes more slack and less plump when it is inflamed and annoyed. It makes a little pimple look much worse than it is. I don't really eat anything containing fructose or sugar at all. Though any kind of carbohydrate will do this to me... not just fructose. I find that I can eat berries and apples, but most fruits aren't great for me. I just try to stay away from most carbohydrates. Potatoes and sweet potatoes are fine, though. And I still sometimes have a few crackers with my soup out of habit.


Suffered from acne as a young adult that went into remission when put on hormonal birth control. Went off the HBC around age 22 and the acne returned with a vengeance (along with a host of other hormonal complaints). 100% clear with a modified diet that excludes dairy, sugars, grains, citrus and cured meats and emphasizes whole food-based nutrition from both plant and animal sources, most notably organ meats like liver and juiced whole vegetables. I have included a recipe for the most helpful juice I have come up with for skin complaints. I drink it every day, and it is invaluable for acne due to the large amounts of vitamin A (carotenoids) from both the carrots and beets. It also helps improve your coloring if you are very fair, giving you a pinkish, more radiant look (not orange. Don't worry!).

 

Magic Juice

 

In a juicer, combine:

 

5-6 carrots

1 medium beet

2-3 stalks of celery

1 small apple (Green is preferred. Omit if you are very sugar-sensitive)

1 small (1inch) piece of ginger (optional, but good for digestion)

 

This makes a variable amount of juice depending on the size of the vegetables you use.

Drink this throughout the morning until it's gone. Store in the fridge not longer than one day.

Having perfectly clear skin on my wedding day was worth all the headache and effort of figuring out how diet affects acne!

10253792_10152330899888950_7455033623381
 


#65 AcneWonderland

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 08:26 AM

So right now, all acne treatments step in to stop acne somewhere in that chain. Benzoyl peroxide helps with "blockages" and "bacteria." Salicylic acid helps with "blockages" and slightly with "inflammation." Accutane shrinks the sebaceous gland. Some other medications directly change the hormone levels. 

 

salicylic acid helps with nothing. sry just saying.

 

btw does acutane shrink the gland forever?

 

If you are getting "acne" as an "allergic" reaction may I suggest that we call that something else. Typical acne as defined by inflammation from a pore blockage initiated by sebaceous gland output started by androgenic action is not the same as an allergic reaction to food, however it may look on the surface of the skin. However there are many skin conditions that similar to acne, (think folliculitis, or KP on the face), and perhaps there are also some allergic reactions that look like acne. But as this is the ACNE board, well...

 

hey if u have acne on your face that looks like acne then it is acne, nobody cares which of 100 types it exactly is or where does it freaking comes from, now its on ur face n we wanna get rid of it and personally idk no allergycausedpimpleslookinglikeacne.org or lookslikerashbutitsfolliculitisactually.org


~my face will be the death of me~

 

acne: resistance is futile!


#66 Green Gables

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 04:05 PM

It does matter if it's actually acne because the treatment can be completely different. Some folliculitis is fungal, for example. Slathering on some Clearasil may help your acne but it will probably do very little for fungal folliculitis. Papulopustular rosacea looks a lot like acne but typically does not respond to acne treatments either. Galderma is currently doing trials for a drug specifically for papulopustular rosacea because it is NOT acne and needs a different approach. For years doctors treated it the same "it looks like acne" so let's give all the rosaceans Accutane. That blew up in their face when it didn't clear the pustules and it also made the other signs of rosacea (erythema) worse. 

 

Lumping together all similar looking skin conditions is NOT a good idea and can harm the patient when attempting to treat it. 

 

Accutane does NOT shrink the gland forever, which is why we have this nasty little thing called acne recurrence after Accutane. Sebaceous glands grow back over time. The rate of growth varies between individuals.


Edited by Green Gables, 13 August 2014 - 04:09 PM.

photo-152109.gif?_r=1345837784?__rand=0.

 

I don't get notified of your response to my post unless you QUOTE my post.

Please only quote a small portion of the post so it doesn't clutter up the thread. 

 

How to Treat Hormonal Acne

Good and Bad Birth Control Pills and Implants for Acne

How to take Spironolactone

List of Doctors Who Prescribe Spironolactone

Topicals for Hormonal Acne

 

HOW I STAY 100% CLEAR:

Spironolactone (anti-androgen drug)

Betaine HCL with each meal

Avoiding silicones and occlusives in skin/hair products

 

 

 


#67 o Havoc o

o Havoc o

    Havoc

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:40 AM

This thread is full of people giving out advice on hormones. The more i read the more i see that people giving out advice on hormones clearly know nothing about Hormones.


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#68 AcneWonderland

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 10:19 AM

This thread is full of people giving out advice on hormones. The more i read the more i see that people giving out advice on hormones clearly know nothing about Hormones.

 

hey do u mayb know if by a blood test is said tht 1 single hormone is elevated, could tht alone b cause for persistant acne? also clogged pores?

like it causes no problems bt just acne??


~my face will be the death of me~

 

acne: resistance is futile!





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