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If My Diet Is So Great, Why Isn't My Skin Great?

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My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear skin?

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yeah i have no idea , maybe its just fate

Gosh, I hope it's not my fate to have bad skin forever :(

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It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

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yea WTF right?

soo hate this...

do u use anything topically?


~my face will be the death of me~

acne: resistance is futile!


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yea WTF right?

soo hate this...

do u use anything topically?

Currently, no. I've tried AHA, BHA, BP, retinoids, sulfur, topical antibiotics, and aczone. Most do nothing for my clogs. Retinoids help, but they make my pores huge and my skin so much more oily so I don't like to use them.

My skin clogs so easily that I can't use most makeup or skin products. The only times I've ever been completely clear were when I took spiro and accutane. Spiro makes my hair fall out and accutane is...well, accutuane. It's a little scary.

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If we could answer this question we would be millionaires. If your skin doesn't function the way it is supposed to, the best diet in the world may help but won't make things perfect. Thank God that inflammatory acne is not your main issue. You probably need to use something topical to work on clogged pores if your skin is genetically like that. You really have to weigh the pros and the cons of retinoids - if it keeps clogs away, isn't it worth the trade off of bigger pores, a little oil and no acne?


It's a rocky road but like everything else in life, there is always a beginning and an end. Here's to finding my end.

God is good to me..........more than I deserve.

James 1:2-4

Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. And let endurance have its perfect result, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.


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If we could answer this question we would be millionaires. If your skin doesn't function the way it is supposed to, the best diet in the world may help but won't make things perfect. Thank God that inflammatory acne is not your main issue. You probably need to use something topical to work on clogged pores if your skin is genetically like that. You really have to weigh the pros and the cons of retinoids - if it keeps clogs away, isn't it worth the trade off of bigger pores, a little oil and no acne?

Inflammatory acne used to be a big issue for me before accutane and then before I changed my diet. I'm glad it's not my main problem anymore, but the little spots I do get now seem to scar :(

I wish I could say the retinoids are worth it, but they're really not. The oil is so intense from them that it feels and looks gross. Then my face is red and it's got an orange peel texture. It might actually look worse than the acne which already looks pretty bad.

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Acne is multifaceted. Your main cause may not be diet...it could be hormonal, allergic (e.g. cosmetics, environmental triggers), gut-related... so many factors to take into consideration, although they are all interrelated in the end.


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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Acne is multifaceted. Your main cause may not be diet...it could be hormonal, allergic (e.g. cosmetics, environmental triggers), gut-related... so many factors to take into consideration, although they are all interrelated in the end.

I do believe my acne is hormonal because spiro clears me completely, but I cannot take it. I don't know how else to target my hormonal acne.

What is your skin washing regimen?

Right now I'm just using jan marinin bioglycolic oily skin cleansing gel.

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Doctors want us to believe that only drug$ are the answer to hormonal acne, but they are not trust me. I manage my hormonal acne with inositol and DIM, as well as some vitamins and a low histamine diet (most of the time, now I'm at the point where I'm reintroducing more foods). It's not easy or a magic solution, but if I can spare my body of any side effects from medications, then I'm happy.


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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Doctors want us to believe that only drug$ are the answer to hormonal acne, but they are not trust me. I manage my hormonal acne with inositol and DIM, as well as some vitamins and a low histamine diet (most of the time, now I'm at the point where I'm reintroducing more foods). It's not easy or a magic solution, but if I can spare my body of any side effects from medications, then I'm happy.

Do you find those things make a difference in non-inflamed acne for you? That is my biggest issue currently as well as oily skin.

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My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

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Doctors want us to believe that only drug$ are the answer to hormonal acne, but they are not trust me. I manage my hormonal acne with inositol and DIM, as well as some vitamins and a low histamine diet (most of the time, now I'm at the point where I'm reintroducing more foods). It's not easy or a magic solution, but if I can spare my body of any side effects from medications, then I'm happy.

Do you find those things make a difference in non-inflamed acne for you? That is my biggest issue currently as well as oily skin.

yes, especially DIM because it's an antioxidant. Basically inflammation = internal inflammation or external sensitivities (could be to sulfites, for instance, or anything topical/ environmental).

Since spiro worked for you, why not try to find a natural alternative that would work? If spiro worked, then your acne is not just diet-related, it's hormonal. But, you can control your hormones through diet (e.g. low GI, paleo, low insulin, etc) just not as easily.

My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

For some it does, for other it doesn't. We can't generalize. Some of my acne calmed down when I switched to the right diet for me....it wasn't any of the popular ones though, those only worked a bit. I had to tailor it to my body's needs. So it really depends on your body and also the type of acne.


Current regimen: garlic supplements [as needed], Enzymedica gluten blocker [as needed], nicadan [not sure if it works yet]. I try to simplify as much as I can. Don't take more supplements than you need....try one at a time and be patient.

The supplements that really helped me when my acne was at its worst: inositol, DIM [not as frequently now!] digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips/ low acid [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme supplements. NOTE: I do not recommend DIM for long term use, and I do not recommend hormonal creams without doctor supervision.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: acupuncture, regular exercise/ yoga, low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials...

 

Grocery list:

 

** Find the cause, find the cure **

** If you have a question for me, please ask it publicly so that others can benefit from the discussion**

 

 


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It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease this sickly culture comes from?

My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear skin?

Paige, what do you mean by clogged up? Blackheads? Closed comedones? I think non inflamed acne like this has to exfoliate away which takes time. You could add mild exfoliants like a BHA or diluted acv. For blackheads a clay mask or oil cleansing which is the only thing I've found to work for me.

And are you sure it isn't caused by a topical? How often are you cleansing?

Is your skin oilier because it's summer?

Is this acne different from what you had before?

Do you consume flax seed?


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease this sickly culture comes from?

My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear skin?

Paige, what do you mean by clogged up? Blackheads? Closed comedones? I think non inflamed acne like this has to exfoliate away which takes time. You could add mild exfoliants like a BHA or diluted acv. For blackheads a clay mask or oil cleansing which is the only thing I've found to work for me.

And are you sure it isn't caused by a topical? How often are you cleansing?

Is your skin oilier because it's summer?

Is this acne different from what you had before?

Do you consume flax seed?

What BHA do you use?


It's a rocky road but like everything else in life, there is always a beginning and an end. Here's to finding my end.

God is good to me..........more than I deserve.

James 1:2-4

Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. And let endurance have its perfect result, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.


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It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease this sickly culture comes from?

My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear skin?

Paige, what do you mean by clogged up? Blackheads? Closed comedones? I think non inflamed acne like this has to exfoliate away which takes time. You could add mild exfoliants like a BHA or diluted acv. For blackheads a clay mask or oil cleansing which is the only thing I've found to work for me.

And are you sure it isn't caused by a topical? How often are you cleansing?

Is your skin oilier because it's summer?

Is this acne different from what you had before?

Do you consume flax seed?

I have a ton of blackheads everywhere and sometimes they become inflamed. It has been a long time and I've tried exfoliants and oil cleansing and they keep popping up. I don't think it could be caused by a topical because they were still there even when I tried just cleansing with oil, just cleansing with soapnuts, and just cleansing with stevia.

My skin is not more oily because it's summer. Last summer my skin was not like this. I got to the point where I could go 8 hours without feeling oily and then I missed 4 birth control pills last month and I'm oily within the hour. I don't know if it's really because of missing the pills, but that's the only thing I can think of.

My acne is not really different than what I had before. Before I did have much more inflamed acne, though.

I do not consume flax.

It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

lockquote>Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease this sickly culture comes from?

>My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear skin?

Paige, what do you mean by clogged up? Blackheads? Closed comedones? I think non inflamed acne like this has to exfoliate away which takes time. You could add mild exfoliants like a BHA or diluted acv. For blackheads a clay mask or oil cleansing which is the only thing I've found to work for me.

And are you sure it isn't caused by a topical? How often are you cleansing?

Is your skin oilier because it's summer?

Is this acne different from what you had before?

Do you consume flax seed?

What BHA do you use?

I've tried quite a few. Paula's choice, neutrogena, dianna yvonne, etc.

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What BHA do you use?

I don't have one currently. I used to use a dissolved aspirin. And for a bit I bought Paula's Choice.

Other than a couple of brief periods when a topical oil (jojoba or almond) caused clogged pores on my forehead and the time I tried MSM, the only noninflamed acne I ever got is blackheads. Which I still get. For some reason, I get them in the center of my chest. Oil cleansing is the only thing that's ever worked for that.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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Considering I'm studying to become a dermatologist, I take offense to knowing "nothing" about how the skin functions. I'm very passionate about skincare, hence why I'm on this forum. If you think acne affects your diet somehow, fantastic- then perhaps you can control it somehow, but don't generalize all other people with varying forms of acne. Let's focus on what we know to be true rather than what is just pseudoscience.

It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

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Considering I'm studying to become a dermatologist, I take offense to knowing "nothing" about how the skin functions. I'm very passionate about skincare, hence why I'm on this forum. If you think acne affects your diet somehow, fantastic- then perhaps you can control it somehow, but don't generalize all other people with varying forms of acne. Let's focus on what we know to be true rather than what is just pseudoscience.

It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.

ockquote>Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease in this sickly culture comes from?

I'm not generalizing. I've gone through tons of research and found numerous instances where diet affects all the factors I named above. In addition to the simple fact that it is not possible for diet to not affect acne or any other aspect of your health.

If you want to be a better than average dermatologist, I suggest you do the same, rather than just memorize what your textbook tells you.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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I'd be very interested to see some before and after pictures of your skin if you happen to have any. Also, based on the severity of your acne, I can only assume you've been left with some degree of scarring?

Considering I'm studying to become a dermatologist, I take offense to knowing "nothing" about how the skin functions. I'm very passionate about skincare, hence why I'm on this forum. If you think acne affects your diet somehow, fantastic- then perhaps you can control it somehow, but don't generalize all other people with varying forms of acne. Let's focus on what we know to be true rather than what is just pseudoscience.

It's not always about diet, even obese people sometimes have flawless skin and they eat complete s**t.

Sometimes it can be genetic.

It's always genetic. Except when it's caused solely by some topical or environmental substance as in chloracne.

And diet always affects our genetic acne.

>My diet has absolutely never affected my acne. I wish it did, because at least then I could do something about it (topicals have it under control for now). I honestly can't stand this theory because it definitely fuels stigma that people with severe cases of acne already get. If I had a dime for every time someone told me "Oh you must be eating gluten" I would seriously be rich. Acne is a disease and rarely a symptom, I wish people would treat it as an actual condition and not a reflection of a "poor lifestyle". That's just my two cents. I know of a few select people that claimed diet affects their acne, but then they never had bad acne to begin with...a blemish here and there, and they also go on to say that eating certain foods triggers a breakout a mere few hours later...pimples, depending on the severity, take at least a week up to a few weeks (if it's cystic) to form, so that invalidates that claim entirely.&n

bsp;
Nearly every word in that post reveals you know nothing about skin function and the many ways diet affect it. I've written extensively about it if you care to learn. Diet affects the hormones involved in acne, the inflammation involved in acne, the hyperkeratinization/hyper proliferation involved in acne and the composition of sebum involved in acne.

I had real acne. Severe acne. For decades. My diet and habits keep me clear. If my diet worsens my skin worsens. And included in my severe acne were cysts/nodules caused by a food intolerance that would appear the day after I consume the food. Now, I don't believe that is true acne. Nevertheless, several derms considered it to be acne and drugged me accordingly.

The real tragedy is all the skinny, clear skinned people think their bad diet and lifestyle isn't harming them. So where do you think all this chronic disease this sickly culture comes from?

My diet has been great for a long time now. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. I avoid wheat, sugar, and animal products. I don't eat vegetable oils or any oils for that matter. I eat good fats (cashews and avocado) and some gluten free whole grains like oatmeal. My skin is still sooo clogged up and lately it has been very oily. It was like this before I eliminated meat too. I exercise, get enough sleep, my vitamin D is not low. My stress levels could be lower, but I have an anxiety disorder so it's never going to be perfect. Why is what I'm doing not good enough to have clear s

kin?

Paige, what do you mean by clogged up? Blackheads? Closed comedones? I think non inflamed acne like this has to exfoliate away which takes time. You could add mild exfoliants like a BHA or diluted acv. For blackheads a clay mask or oil cleansing which is the only thing I've found to work for me.

And are you sure it isn't caused by a topical? How often are you cleansing?

Is your skin oilier because it's summer?

Is this acne different from what you had before?

Do you consume flax seed?

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All I can show you is pictures of my current clear skin and scarring. I took some today. However, I had dermabrasion done years ago so they aren't as deep as they would otherwise be.

Also:

I'd be very interested to see some before and after pictures of your skin if you happen to have any. Also, based on the severity of your acne, I can only assume you've been left with some degree of scarring?


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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That's interesting that you got improvement from dermabrasion, there aren't very many people who obtain more than minimal improvements or end up with worse scarring (at least according to online reviews). How much improvement did you get from the procedure?

All I can show you is pictures of my current clear skin and scarring. I took some today. However, I had dermabrasion done years ago so they aren't as deep as they would otherwise be.

Also:

I'd be very interested to see some before and after pictures of your skin if you happen to have any. Also, based on the severity of your acne, I can only assume you've been left with some degree of scarring?

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That's interesting that you got improvement from dermabrasion, there aren't very many people who obtain more than minimal improvements or end up with worse scarring (at least according to online reviews). How much improvement did you get from the procedure?

ll I can show you is pictures of my current clear skin and scarring. I took some today. However, I had dermabrasion done years ago so they aren't as deep as they would otherwise be.

lso:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/315130-things-that-are-different-in-acne-prone-skin-the-differences-between-us-and-them/

I can;'t really say. It was so long ago. I was left with a lot of hyperpigmentation as a result of the scabbing. For a long time, there was a clear line around one of my eyes. Also, I usually got the cysts/nodules, i.e. the most scarring form of acne, on my jawline, neck, back of neck, back, chest & temples. So, the worst scars were at the temples. I've tried, but I can't get a good picture of them. I don't even know if I have scars on my back, or back of neck. And chest scars look like small whitish bumps.

I went outside with my ipad and managed to get one picture in which i think anyone would see the scarring. What you can't see besides my temple is my most hated scars. A row of tiny pits right where the smile creases form as you age and lose elasticity. Making it look like I already have that happening on one side of my face. http://www.acne.org/messageboard/gallery/image/53841-cheek-scars/


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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