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Collagen Induction Therapy - Healing Process

collagen induction cit dermastamp healing

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#1 Charchi

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Posted 02 July 2014 - 02:49 PM

Hello! My first post here.
I had collagen induction therapy (e-needling) six days ago and I have some questions about the healing process. My CIT was done by a professional. A 1mm (for sensitive areas like nose and above lip) and 1.5mm length stamps were used.

After 6 days, I have no pain, some redness but many pinpoint scabs and red dots with a terrible dotted texture. I'm looking for some reassurance that this strange texture will improve. My healing seems to be taking longer than other posts I've read here. I've read several threads where scabs fell off day 2-3 and skin texture looked great after day 5.

Any here experienced a longer than normal healing time?

I've been using vitamin gel and zinc oxide religiously (provided by the dr).

#2 pineappleXpress

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:49 PM

That's normal. My scabs from professional CIT have lasted sometimes over a week. Just don't pick at em they'll fall off soon on their own.

2-3 day's is very quick for a scab to fall off, in my opinion & experience. Mine have never fallen off that quickly. And the weird texture you mentioned should get better as your skin continues to heal. I wouldn't worry too much :).

Edited by pineappleXpress, 06 July 2014 - 05:53 PM.


#3 Nikolaos

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 07:38 PM

I have a question.

 

It is said that you should dermaroll/stamp your face every 4-6 weeks because that is how much time it takes your skin to heal/build collagen. What if you stamp/roll your face, lets say, every 4-5 days? Obviously the skin won't be able to heal completely in between CIT sessions. What's the worst that can happen? Any ideas?



#4 pineappleXpress

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 10:27 PM

I believe the worst that will happen is that you will disrupt all the necessary healing steps that are supposed to lead to that very collagen you are trying to form therefore, possibly destroying it and in turn negating the whole purpose of CIT.

Physically on the surface you will see no ill effects of needling often, everything is going to appear normal on the surface, but down below the skin is a different story .

Edited by pineappleXpress, 18 July 2014 - 10:33 PM.


#5 u1971

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 01:21 AM

I have a question.

 

It is said that you should dermaroll/stamp your face every 4-6 weeks because that is how much time it takes your skin to heal/build collagen. What if you stamp/roll your face, lets say, every 4-5 days? Obviously the skin won't be able to heal completely in between CIT sessions. What's the worst that can happen? Any ideas?

 

Scar tissue formation can happen also. I have acne scars because I had pimples on the same spots over and over, so that my skin didn't have time to heal completely from a lesion and it had to deal with a new lesion.

 

I have some inputs I copied from the Essential Day Spa message board. The post was written by a user called Josee on Sat Jun 06, 2009 8:30 am (dermaroller thread, page 142)

 

" 1) There is no evidence that using a roller often (e.g. 2-3 times per week), no matter how short, is safe. Even the shortest rollers (0.13 mm) penetrate the dermis, and generate a microinflammatory reaction. Thus it is uncertain that continued micro-injuries will not have a long-term deleterious consequence.

2) Rollers that penetrate the dermis substantially (1 mm and up) should be used sparingly.
Rollers that penetrate the dermis substantially generate an inflammatory response and start the healing process. This includes laying down a new collagen matrix so that new collagen will be deposited.
The collagen matrix is layed down approximately 5 days post-injury. Thus if you roll often, you will end up disturing the collagen matrix. In addition, rolling often will perpetuate and increase the inflammatory response. These 2 things are bad because:

a. Disrupting the collagen matrix continuously will eventually cause a less-than-optimal laying of the collagen, which can cause scarring and uneven skin
b. Increasing the inflammation process will encourage the deposit of scar collagen

 

3) Any roller with chances of penetrating the hypodermis (2.0 and up) should be used in a sterile environment

...

However, skin inflammation, if done continuously, will eventually lead to skin stress, and skin aging.

... "

 

Link:

http://www.essential...asc&&start=3525


Edited by marcosctb, 19 July 2014 - 01:44 AM.





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