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Hormone & Vitamin Tests

hormones vitamins deficiencies pcos cystic acne tests panels

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#1 WishClean

WishClean

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 09:33 PM

Hello,

I thought it might be a useful idea for everyone to contribute to this thread with useful hormonal and/or vitamin tests they ordered through their doctor/ naturopath/ online. This is to help those who are confused about which tests to order, especially if your doctor does not specialize in hormonal imbalances, nutrient deficiencies, and other issues.

Here's my list. I will add more later because I'm in a rush right now.

 

- First of all, hormonal blood tests, unless you take the same tests several times a month and at different times of the day, are not very helpful. You need either saliva or urine tests (taken a few times a month) to chart your monthly hormonal fluctuations. No test is 100% accurate, so it's wise to also consider other symptoms besides acne  (e.g. look up things like adrenal fatigue, estrogen dominance, zinc deficiency, etc). 

 

- HORMONAL PANEL: Ask for a full panel, including all the thyroid tests (not just T3, also T4 and anything else available), E1 and E2 for estrogen (not just E2, that won't help if you have estrogen dominance), all the androgens/ testosterone, progesterone (very important), and a few other neglected hormones that can still cause acne but doctors rarely check them, like cortisol and prolactin. There are a few more, but I forget now... I'll post the actual names for each test when I look them up. 

 

- VITAMINS and MINERALS: Vitamin D and zinc are the 2 common deficiencies for acne sufferers. Niacin might be another one, inositol (especially if you have PCOS), and other Bs (like B12). Check your iron, magnesium, chromium, and selenium too if you don't normally eat very healthy and/or if you have anemia (or if you are vegetarian). 

 

- You can also get tested for celia's disease/ gluten intolerance if you have severe allergic reactions. If your reactions are not severe (i.e. no hives etc), then you can take the ALCAT test or something similar for intolerances. If you don't want to spend a lot of money, try doing a simple histamine test to see how high your histamines are compared to the average. If they are higher than average, then you either have allergies/ intolerances or mast cell disorder/ mastocytosis. 

 

Add more below...



#2 WishClean

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 12:44 AM

Bumping to add the hormone ACTH, which can affect cortisol production, estrogen, and androgens, especially when progesterone levels are low. 

Also the sex steroid hormone 17-Hydroxypregnenolone.

I'm adding these because I was reading a recent thread about hyperplasia, and then stumbled upon an older thread on N-CAH(nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia)

 

I googled the symptoms of NCAH...I wonder how many have this and have no idea about it.

Source: http://www.caresfoundation.org/productcart/pc/ncah_late_onset_cah.html 

 

Both males and females with NCAH may show the following: 
Premature development of body hair (pubic and underarm)
Body odor (young children’s perspiration normally has no odor)
Early, rapid growth spurt, but ultimately short stature as adult 
Oily hair and skin
Severe acne
Mood swings
Infertility

 

Also, apparently doctors say the following if only the acne is treated:

What Happens if NCAH is Not Properly Diagnosed and Treated?

Missing the diagnosis of NCAH can have serious consequences. Some common consequences are:

Inefficient treatment: Treatment may be directed at the symptoms of NCAH rather than the disease itself. For example, acne may be treated for just this symptom, while other damaging effects of NCAH continue unchecked. Also, treating the disease itself is more effective than treating the symptoms alone.

 

This is another reason why I urge everyone (including myself, when I finally get better health insurance) to get tested for what might be causing your acne, rather than just treat the acne in isolation of other possible symptoms. There are other posts here and there on acne.org of people with more serious medical conditions that resolved their acne issues once they addressed their health problems. 


Edited by WishClean, 26 July 2014 - 10:52 AM.





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