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Vegan Diet For Acne?


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#21 WishClean

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 05:48 PM

I don't think I'm disciplined enough to try veganism long term, but if it's working for you then that's great plus it saves a few animals. I was vegetarian for over 10 years, then I added fish, and now I also eat meat to see if it would make a difference. Eating meat has actually made my anemia symptoms almost disappear, so I guess I may have had an iron deficiency from being vegetarian all those years. I wish I didn't have to eat meat because I don't like the thought of eating animals, but for me it seems to be a better diet than being vegetarian. What do you eat as part of a vegan diet? Some people avoid soy and tofu, which makes it hard to get protein. 


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#22 alternativista

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 11:31 AM

Biological evidence that we should eat a great deal of greens:

 

"researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, reflecting how important this mineral is to a great many biological processes."

http://articles.merc...t_rid=516458224

 

As a major component of chlorophyll, green leaves are one of the biggest sources.  The other is seeds.  (for the plant to sprout it's first leaves.)


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#23 paigems

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 03:59 PM

Go for it! Seriously! After being vegan for 3 or so months (I've been vegan for over a year now), I never had acne again. smile.png This after taking Accutane, and then Spironolactone! I don't take any meds anymore; I just use retin-a for my pores, which look a million times better now. I think most arguments against veganism are plain silly. I don't have to eat all day, I eat as often and as fast as my family, and they eat meat and dairy and eggs. I eat 2000+ calories a day. My labs are perfect. My weight is perfect. It's super easy. The only thing I supplement is B12; from what I understand, humans of the past were able to get a substantial amount of B12 from the soil, but with current food production practices we need to supplement. All I do is add 2 tbsp. total throughout the day of nutritional yeast to my foods. I'm of the opinion that meat and animal products are downright just not good for us, particularly with how they are produced in our modern day. Plus, the vegan diet is cruelty free. smile.png Good luck, and if you have any questions feel free to pm me!

I'm glad to hear that veganism is working out so well for your acne! Would you mind sharing what you eat on a typical day? I also like the nutritional yeast idea!

 

I don't think I'm disciplined enough to try veganism long term, but if it's working for you then that's great plus it saves a few animals. I was vegetarian for over 10 years, then I added fish, and now I also eat meat to see if it would make a difference. Eating meat has actually made my anemia symptoms almost disappear, so I guess I may have had an iron deficiency from being vegetarian all those years. I wish I didn't have to eat meat because I don't like the thought of eating animals, but for me it seems to be a better diet than being vegetarian. What do you eat as part of a vegan diet? Some people avoid soy and tofu, which makes it hard to get protein. 

 

I'm actually surprised I'm disciplined enough to do this. A year ago I was feeling sorry for myself because I couldn't eat like everyone else, but now as I see improvements it becomes easier. I still have clogged pores and a bit of oily skin, and I'm willing to manipulate my diet as much as possible to see if I can get rid of those things. Right now this is still just an experiment, though, and I'm not sure if I'll continue eating this way long term. For breakfast I usually eat oatmeal with a green smoothie; lunch is usually carrots, celery, corn, beans, and peas; Dinner is peas, green beans, celery, beans, carrots, and potatoes; Snacks are fruits and veggies, and in the late evening I usually have another bowl of oatmeal. I feel like my diet could use a lot of improvements. It contains a lot of foods which I think have a high glycemic impact, but several of those food are high in calories and I feel like I need that because I am very thin and it's very easy for me to lose weight. I'm also trying to keep my diet low fat which makes it more difficult. In the future I'd like to cut out the huge quantity of peas and corn, start eating sweet potatoes instead of russet, add quinoa into my diet, and maybe find a replacement for my oatmeal, though, I'm not sure what that would be.

 

Biological evidence that we should eat a great deal of greens:

 

"researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, reflecting how important this mineral is to a great many biological processes."

http://articles.merc...t_rid=516458224

 

As a major component of chlorophyll, green leaves are one of the biggest sources.  The other is seeds.  (for the plant to sprout it's first leaves.)

 

This is very interesting! Thanks for sharing. I already drink green smoothies, but I'll have to try to add more greens into my diet.



#24 dscully

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:52 PM

What do you guys think of eating a vegan diet for acne and health in general? What do you think of the arguments vegan make about their diet being the ideal diet for humans? Also, I'm not talking about a junky vegan diet full of processed stuff. I'm talking about a vegan diet with lots of plan based foods.

Well, since there are no human societies that are vegan and humans did not evolve to be vegan, I'd say it's certainly not evolutionarily correct. 100% clear, and I eat meat, butter, eggs, fish, and whatever I want as long as it's not milk, sugar, or processed crap. Veganism is a pretty new thing. If you're clear on a vegan diet, it's because it's usually low-carb and carbohydrates are a common cause of acne. I still eat a ton of vegetables. I in no way intend to demonize eating vegetables. Vegetables are my life.


Edited by dscully, 12 May 2014 - 04:53 PM.

Suffered from acne as a young adult that went into remission when put on hormonal birth control. Went off the HBC around age 22 and the acne returned with a vengeance (along with a host of other hormonal complaints). 100% clear with a modified diet that excludes dairy, sugars, grains, citrus and cured meats and emphasizes whole food-based nutrition from both plant and animal sources, most notably organ meats like liver and juiced whole vegetables. I have included a recipe for the most helpful juice I have come up with for skin complaints. I drink it every day, and it is invaluable for acne due to the large amounts of vitamin A (carotenoids) from both the carrots and beets. It also helps improve your coloring if you are very fair, giving you a pinkish, more radiant look (not orange. Don't worry!).

 

Magic Juice

 

In a juicer, combine:

 

5-6 carrots

1 medium beet

2-3 stalks of celery

1 small apple (Green is preferred. Omit if you are very sugar-sensitive)

1 small (1inch) piece of ginger (optional, but good for digestion)

 

This makes a variable amount of juice depending on the size of the vegetables you use.

Drink this throughout the morning until it's gone. Store in the fridge not longer than one day.

Having perfectly clear skin on my wedding day was worth all the headache and effort of figuring out how diet affects acne!

10253792_10152330899888950_7455033623381
 


#25 TheSavyBanana

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 06:49 PM

Go for it! Seriously! After being vegan for 3 or so months (I've been vegan for over a year now), I never had acne again. smile.png This after taking Accutane, and then Spironolactone! I don't take any meds anymore; I just use retin-a for my pores, which look a million times better now. I think most arguments against veganism are plain silly. I don't have to eat all day, I eat as often and as fast as my family, and they eat meat and dairy and eggs. I eat 2000+ calories a day. My labs are perfect. My weight is perfect. It's super easy. The only thing I supplement is B12; from what I understand, humans of the past were able to get a substantial amount of B12 from the soil, but with current food production practices we need to supplement. All I do is add 2 tbsp. total throughout the day of nutritional yeast to my foods. I'm of the opinion that meat and animal products are downright just not good for us, particularly with how they are produced in our modern day. Plus, the vegan diet is cruelty free. smile.png Good luck, and if you have any questions feel free to pm me!

I'm glad to hear that veganism is working out so well for your acne! Would you mind sharing what you eat on a typical day? I also like the nutritional yeast idea!
 

I don't think I'm disciplined enough to try veganism long term, but if it's working for you then that's great plus it saves a few animals. I was vegetarian for over 10 years, then I added fish, and now I also eat meat to see if it would make a difference. Eating meat has actually made my anemia symptoms almost disappear, so I guess I may have had an iron deficiency from being vegetarian all those years. I wish I didn't have to eat meat because I don't like the thought of eating animals, but for me it seems to be a better diet than being vegetarian. What do you eat as part of a vegan diet? Some people avoid soy and tofu, which makes it hard to get protein. 

 
I'm actually surprised I'm disciplined enough to do this. A year ago I was feeling sorry for myself because I couldn't eat like everyone else, but now as I see improvements it becomes easier. I still have clogged pores and a bit of oily skin, and I'm willing to manipulate my diet as much as possible to see if I can get rid of those things. Right now this is still just an experiment, though, and I'm not sure if I'll continue eating this way long term. For breakfast I usually eat oatmeal with a green smoothie; lunch is usually carrots, celery, corn, beans, and peas; Dinner is peas, green beans, celery, beans, carrots, and potatoes; Snacks are fruits and veggies, and in the late evening I usually have another bowl of oatmeal. I feel like my diet could use a lot of improvements. It contains a lot of foods which I think have a high glycemic impact, but several of those food are high in calories and I feel like I need that because I am very thin and it's very easy for me to lose weight. I'm also trying to keep my diet low fat which makes it more difficult. In the future I'd like to cut out the huge quantity of peas and corn, start eating sweet potatoes instead of russet, add quinoa into my diet, and maybe find a replacement for my oatmeal, though, I'm not sure what that would be.
 

Biological evidence that we should eat a great deal of greens:
 
"researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, reflecting how important this mineral is to a great many biological processes."
http://articles.merc...t_rid=516458224
 
As a major component of chlorophyll, green leaves are one of the biggest sources.  The other is seeds.  (for the plant to sprout it's first leaves.)

 
This is very interesting! Thanks for sharing. I already drink green smoothies, but I'll have to try to add more greens into my diet.

Of course! For breakfast I almost always have a GIANT green smoothie. It's just easier to get down early in the mornings than something heartier, and it tastes sooo good! If not that I'll have rolled oats prepared with almond milk, cinnamon, and fresh fruit like blueberries and bananas, or raisins. Sometimes I'll add walnuts or flax seeds. For lunch I typically have a big quinoa bowl with nutritional yeast, steamed broccoli, kale, carrots... Lots of different kinds of veggies! To some it seems bland, but I like it that way (you can always add a sauce). My dinners vary a lot, but my staples are lentils, black beans, (actually lots of different beans) and steamed veggies. There are a lot of creative dinners I've made with beans and veggies. I also tend to like something fattier, like avocado, at night as well. For snacks I have fruits and veggies, hummus, nuts, or peanut butter, depending on how hungry I'm feeling feeling/ what I've eaten so far in the day.

I hope that was helpful. I too have to keep my weight up, so I tend to eat large servings, but I'm used to eat. I guess my only advice really is to listen to your body, and you'll know if this lifestyle will work for you. You can always add back in animal products if that's what you need. Good luck!!

You! Yes, you. The one reading this. You are beautiful, talented, amazing and simply the best at being you. Never forget that.

 

You don't have to be pretty. You don't owe prettiness to anyone. Not to you boyfriend/spouse/partner. Not to your coworkers, especially not to random men on the street. You don't owe it to your mother, you don't owe it to your children, you don't owe it to civilization in general. Prettiness is not a rent you pay for occupying a space marked "female."

Plea to the world: Eat less meat! Or better yet, don't eat it at all! The meat industry violates basic animal rights, it's destroying our planet, and there are so many health benefits you can gain by decreasing/eliminating meat from your diet. Don't let me tell you- do your own research so you can decide for yourself. (The dairy and egg industries are just as horrendous).

I highly recommend watching the movie Earthlings. ^

#26 paigems

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 03:38 PM

I've added some fat back into my diet in the form of nuts and avocado and my skin is less oily. I think maybe the fat is helping with the absorption of the other stuff I'm eating.



#27 alternativista

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 06:58 AM

You need fat to absorb many nutrients.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#28 cvd

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 11:06 AM

Personally I think omnivore is best for humans based on science and observation...but with caveats.  I think vegans see good results because they are eating little processed fat and avoiding excessive natural hormones present in dairy and red meat.  When I was younger being a vegetarian was considered the best diet...but we ate tons of cheese.  And guess what?  My acne turned cystic because my particular skin could not handle all the additional dairy.  All that cheese and oil used in cooking made my skin an oily mess.

 

Eating some wild fish and wild fresh game will not add to acne because both are low in hormones and provide needed nutrients and naturally occurring fats necessary for optimum health.  Human teeth are mostly molars for grinding and 4 canine teeth for tearing flesh.  This is most likely a correct ratio for our diet...i.e. mostly plant foods with some flesh but not much.  It also echoes what our ape ancestors eat which is mostly plants with some flesh on occasion.  Necessary proteins and nutrients (B vitamins) are very concentrated in flesh foods and not much has be eaten, nor everyday, for there to be sufficient effect.

 

There are hormones in plant foods but there is controversy in the scientific community on impact in the human body if eaten in their whole natural state versus in concentrated processed foods such as soy protein drinks, etc.  I think observing different cultures and how they eat and look physically is helpful.  Asian cultures eat lots of whole soy foods and some processed soy foods but those foods are fermented and made from the whole soy bean, not an isolated protein.  Asians have eaten this way for thousands of years and those that eat the traditional way...lots of fresh plant foods with bits of flesh food mostly steamed or cooked in minimal amounts of oil...are healthy, robust and generally acne free.  It is only in recent times with the addition of western foods that Asians are now confronting a rise in acne.

 

My daughter-in-law is Chinese and contrary to how foods are cooked in American asian restaurants (food sauteed in lots of oil), real homemade Chinese cooking uses hardly any oil at all...just drops with added water to create a steaming effect.  She can hardly stand all the oily food Americans eat.  Guess what...her skin is flawless.  My son eats very healthy but still loves his cheese.  Guess what...he has some acne.  She is trying to get him to eat less cheese!

 

I think the reason some people have success with paleo diets is because they avoid processed oils in favor of fats naturally occurring in meats and they avoid junk foods and overly processed grain foods.  They tend to eat more whole foods.

 

So the key to optimum health is to eat whole plant foods and wild meats, in their natural state, as minimally processed as possible (dice and steam, etc.). Avoid factory farmed eggs and meats because of additives and hormones.  Avoid dairy because of concentrated naturally present hormones (humans should only drink milk from their human mothers when they are babies...just like every other mammal on the planet).  That's it in a nutshell.  Also avoid anything you are personally sensitive too.  I can't eat nuts or high fructose foods...just can't digest them.  But that's me.  Everyone's got their quirks!  


Status - 99.9% clear

Morning - Panoxyl 4 Cleanser (BP), Cleocin-T, DML Lotion, Physician's Formula SPF 30 Mineral Pressed Powder, Spiro 100 mg

Night - Cetaphil Antibacterial Bar, DML Lotion

Monthly - Professional microdermabrasion

Diet - Whole high nutrient unprocessed foods.  Avoid oils, dairy, sugars, bread, nuts, alcohol, caffeine, and fermented foods.

Supplements - Opti l-zinc, citrical + D3

Daily - Walk, breath deeply, meditate and do yoga daily, wear hats for sun protection 

 

 



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