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Nutritional Deficiencies & Depression

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#1 WishClean

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 09:49 PM

I know some of you here think this is BS, but for those receptive to truly understanding how the body functions and what the connection is between deficiencies & neurological imbalances, please take a look at this article as a starting point. I find it interesting in terms of simply explaining the brain & body's chemical balance. It's not a comprehensive study or anything, but a good starting point for some potentially breakthrough research. For what it's worth, I not only went through very severe depression more than once in my life, but I also studied depression from a clinical perspective, only to realize that doctors do not fully understand the different possible mechanisms that can trigger and worsen depressive tendencies.

http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/10-nutritional-deficiences-that-cause-depression.html 

As someone who has greatly improved depression after addressing my vitamin D deficiency, I can verify there is some merit to this approach. It sure beats antidepressants, and contributes to improving your overall health. Whoever wants to undermine my opinion and say I know nothing about depression (you know who you are), don't even bother reading this. All I can say is based on my experience and friends who I offered this advice to, depression can be reduced by addressing significant nutritional deficiencies. Of course, the emotional aspects of depression need to be addressed as well, but physiologically speaking, these deficiencies can make matters worse.

TOP 10 FOODS AND VITAMINS/ MINERALS/ AMINOACIDS  TO NOTICE:

- Sugar intake - obvious one. Limit your intake of junk food as much as possible.

- Omega 3s - I personally don't supplement with omega 3s, I just try to incorporate them into my diet but there are many on this forum who had success with O3 supps.

- Vitamin D ---> this is my top one

- B-vitamins deficiency ---> another one that helped me, particularly inositol (B8) for hormonal balance

- zinc, folate, chromium, and iron -- I would also add selenium to this list.

- iodine deficiency (or, I would add, iodine excess in some cases, both of which can cause/ are caused by thyroid problems)

- amino-acid deficiency

 

*check my other post below for more links & studies *


Edited by WishClean, 15 January 2014 - 12:11 AM.

Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#2 kokobear

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 11:41 PM

I know some of you here think this is BS, but for those receptive to truly understanding how the body functions and what the connection is between deficiencies & neurological imbalances, please take a look at this article as a starting point. I find it interesting in terms of simply explaining the brain & body's chemical balance. It's not a comprehensive study or anything, but a good starting point for some potentially breakthrough research. For what it's worth, I not only went through very severe depression more than once in my life, but I also studied depression from a clinical perspective, only to realize that doctors do not fully understand the different possible mechanisms that can trigger and worsen depressive tendencies.

http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/10-nutritional-deficiences-that-cause-depression.html 

As someone who has greatly improved depression after addressing my vitamin D deficiency, I can verify there is some merit to this approach. It sure beats antidepressants, and contributes to improving your overall health. Whoever wants to undermine my opinion and say I know nothing about depression (you know who you are), don't even bother reading this. All I can say is based on my experience and friends who I offered this advice to, depression can be reduced by addressing significant nutritional deficiencies. Of course, the emotional aspects of depression need to be addressed as well, but physiologically speaking, these deficiencies can make matters worse.

TOP 10 FOODS AND VITAMINS/ MINERALS/ AMINOACIDS  TO NOTICE:

- Sugar intake - obvious one. Limit your intake of junk food as much as possible.

- Omega 3s - I personally don't supplement with omega 3s, I just try to incorporate them into my diet but there are many on this forum who had success with O3 supps.

- Vitamin D ---> this is my top one

- B-vitamins deficiency ---> another one that helped me, particularly inositol (B8) for hormonal balance

- zinc, folate, chromium, and iron -- I would also add selenium to this list.

- iodine deficiency (or, I would add, iodine excess in some cases, both of which can cause/ are caused by thyroid problems)

- amino-acid deficiency

 

It only takes a simple blood test to rule out any kind of nutritional deficiency, most of the time there isn't one in regards to Depression.

 

What are you depressed about?



#3 WishClean

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:11 AM

I know some of you here think this is BS, but for those receptive to truly understanding how the body functions and what the connection is between deficiencies & neurological imbalances, please take a look at this article as a starting point. I find it interesting in terms of simply explaining the brain & body's chemical balance. It's not a comprehensive study or anything, but a good starting point for some potentially breakthrough research. For what it's worth, I not only went through very severe depression more than once in my life, but I also studied depression from a clinical perspective, only to realize that doctors do not fully understand the different possible mechanisms that can trigger and worsen depressive tendencies.

http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/10-nutritional-deficiences-that-cause-depression.html 

As someone who has greatly improved depression after addressing my vitamin D deficiency, I can verify there is some merit to this approach. It sure beats antidepressants, and contributes to improving your overall health. Whoever wants to undermine my opinion and say I know nothing about depression (you know who you are), don't even bother reading this. All I can say is based on my experience and friends who I offered this advice to, depression can be reduced by addressing significant nutritional deficiencies. Of course, the emotional aspects of depression need to be addressed as well, but physiologically speaking, these deficiencies can make matters worse.

TOP 10 FOODS AND VITAMINS/ MINERALS/ AMINOACIDS  TO NOTICE:

- Sugar intake - obvious one. Limit your intake of junk food as much as possible.

- Omega 3s - I personally don't supplement with omega 3s, I just try to incorporate them into my diet but there are many on this forum who had success with O3 supps.

- Vitamin D ---> this is my top one

- B-vitamins deficiency ---> another one that helped me, particularly inositol (B8) for hormonal balance

- zinc, folate, chromium, and iron -- I would also add selenium to this list.

- iodine deficiency (or, I would add, iodine excess in some cases, both of which can cause/ are caused by thyroid problems)

- amino-acid deficiency

 

It only takes a simple blood test to rule out any kind of nutritional deficiency, most of the time there isn't one in regards to Depression.

 

What are you depressed about?

The blood tests for deficiencies are not simple or conclusive unfortunately. But I did test very low on vitamin D, and during that time I was really depressed about everything and couldn't pull myself out of it. Within about a month of vitamin D supplementation, the depressive thoughts lessened significantly. Also, I discovered I was low on some B vitamins, which helped my overall mood. I'm not saying it's the answer to everyone's problems, but some people who suffer from depression also happen to have deficiencies in these important nutrients.


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#4 kokobear

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:57 AM

 

I know some of you here think this is BS, but for those receptive to truly understanding how the body functions and what the connection is between deficiencies & neurological imbalances, please take a look at this article as a starting point. I find it interesting in terms of simply explaining the brain & body's chemical balance. It's not a comprehensive study or anything, but a good starting point for some potentially breakthrough research. For what it's worth, I not only went through very severe depression more than once in my life, but I also studied depression from a clinical perspective, only to realize that doctors do not fully understand the different possible mechanisms that can trigger and worsen depressive tendencies.

http://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/10-nutritional-deficiences-that-cause-depression.html 

As someone who has greatly improved depression after addressing my vitamin D deficiency, I can verify there is some merit to this approach. It sure beats antidepressants, and contributes to improving your overall health. Whoever wants to undermine my opinion and say I know nothing about depression (you know who you are), don't even bother reading this. All I can say is based on my experience and friends who I offered this advice to, depression can be reduced by addressing significant nutritional deficiencies. Of course, the emotional aspects of depression need to be addressed as well, but physiologically speaking, these deficiencies can make matters worse.

TOP 10 FOODS AND VITAMINS/ MINERALS/ AMINOACIDS  TO NOTICE:

- Sugar intake - obvious one. Limit your intake of junk food as much as possible.

- Omega 3s - I personally don't supplement with omega 3s, I just try to incorporate them into my diet but there are many on this forum who had success with O3 supps.

- Vitamin D ---> this is my top one

- B-vitamins deficiency ---> another one that helped me, particularly inositol (B8) for hormonal balance

- zinc, folate, chromium, and iron -- I would also add selenium to this list.

- iodine deficiency (or, I would add, iodine excess in some cases, both of which can cause/ are caused by thyroid problems)

- amino-acid deficiency

 

It only takes a simple blood test to rule out any kind of nutritional deficiency, most of the time there isn't one in regards to Depression.

 

What are you depressed about?

The blood tests for deficiencies are not simple or conclusive unfortunately. But I did test very low on vitamin D, and during that time I was really depressed about everything and couldn't pull myself out of it. Within about a month of vitamin D supplementation, the depressive thoughts lessened significantly. Also, I discovered I was low on some B vitamins, which helped my overall mood. I'm not saying it's the answer to everyone's problems, but some people who suffer from depression also happen to have deficiencies in these important nutrients.

 

I would say they're conclusive, you're either deficient or you're not. Where are you getting your information?

 

Depression is a mental illness highly related to your emotional coping style, not a nutritional disorder. There is very weak correlation between depression and vitamin deficiencies/diet. What you experienced may just be a coincidence, for the majority of people their depression does not subside with any sort of vitamin supplementation.



#5 Bodie81

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:53 AM

WishClean, I think the "you know who you are" comment was aimed at me and someone else. For my part, I just want to apologise for being rude - I was feeling pretty irrational at the time but that`s no excuse and I shouldn`t have said what I said.

 

Even though it`s not something that has ever helped me, I`m pleased for you that you have managed to find the cure for your own depression by addressing nutritional and vitamin deficiencies.

 

The only thing I would say to anyone who is currently taking anti-depressants is this. If they are not working and you are looking to try an alternative remedy for your depression, before stopping or even weaning yourself off them gradually please consult your GP, physician, psychiatrist or any other medical professional that you are currently under the care of. I`ve made the mistake of self-regulating and stopping anti-depressants off my own back in the past and without going into detail on here, the consequences were nearly very grave.


Edited by GUNNKE, 14 January 2014 - 12:04 PM.


#6 WishClean

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:57 PM

WishClean, I think the "you know who you are" comment was aimed at me and someone else. For my part, I just want to apologise for being rude - I was feeling pretty irrational at the time but that`s no excuse and I shouldn`t have said what I said.

 

Even though it`s not something that has ever helped me, I`m pleased for you that you have managed to find the cure for your own depression by addressing nutritional and vitamin deficiencies.

 

The only thing I would say to anyone who is currently taking anti-depressants is this. If they are not working and you are looking to try an alternative remedy for your depression, before stopping or even weaning yourself off them gradually please consult your GP, physician, psychiatrist or any other medical professional that you are currently under the care of. I`ve made the mistake of self-regulating and stopping anti-depressants off my own back in the past and without going into detail on here, the consequences were nearly very grave.

Hi Gunkke, I didn't mean you specifically because you get your points across without coming off as abrupt or rude. So don't take this personally, I never thought you were rude to me and I wasn't thinking of you in particular when I wrote this. I was just offended that someone told me I know nothing about depression and made my own struggles with depression seem INVALID. I nearly died from depression more than once, so I thought it was presumptuous to accuse me of knowing nothing about depression. I know too much about it, from both experience and from studying it from a clinical perspective. Everyone's experience of depression is different, who is one to say mine wasn't as serious as theirs? I just happen to go about treating it in practical ways that to some might seem unorthodox because they don't involve meds. I wanted to put this potential way to help depression out there if antidepressants didn't work for some (and obviously, those on antidepressants making suicidal comments are on the wrong treatment)

I tried antidepressants in the past with consequences that almost got me hospitalized and my NHS doctor took no responsibility, she just apathetically told me she couldn't help me any longer because her solution was to completely numb me to any pain or emotion. So I had to do my own research and see how and why some people are predisposed to depression or react this way to situations that need not be so overwhelming to begin with. I think depression can be overcome with practical steps if the person truly wants to be helped. This is my opinion and it's based on personal experience so take it as you will.


And for some proof on my theory, you only need to do a basic google search for depression and deficiencies to see all the results and studies. Nothing conclusive of course, but this type of research won't ever be popular with doctors working within the pharmaceutical system because then they won't be able to prescribe antidepressants so loosely (again, speaking for myself - I was offered antidepressants at the beginning of my first visit with a therapist , twice).

 

If anyone hasn't tried to approach their depression from the nutritional aspect, then you can't really criticize this method until you attempt it. It may not cure all your issues, but in my case supplementing with vitamin D (under doctor's supervision) helped me pull myself together when I didn't think it was possible.

 

Links between vitamin D and depression: http://www.webmd.com...d-to-depression

http://www.psycholog...-and-depression

http://www.scienceda...20625152358.htm

 

Medical study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23377209 --> concluding that "our analyses are consistent with the hypothesis that low vitamin D concentration is associated with depression, and highlight the need for randomised controlled trials of vitamin D for the prevention and treatment of depression to determine whether this association is causal." It might be a chicken or egg thing for some -- i.e. depression depletes the body of vitamin D--> low vitamin D worsens depression --> & vice versa


Edited by WishClean, 14 January 2014 - 05:43 PM.

Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#7 Bodie81

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:01 PM

WishClean, I think the "you know who you are" comment was aimed at me and someone else. For my part, I just want to apologise for being rude - I was feeling pretty irrational at the time but that`s no excuse and I shouldn`t have said what I said.

 

Even though it`s not something that has ever helped me, I`m pleased for you that you have managed to find the cure for your own depression by addressing nutritional and vitamin deficiencies.

 

The only thing I would say to anyone who is currently taking anti-depressants is this. If they are not working and you are looking to try an alternative remedy for your depression, before stopping or even weaning yourself off them gradually please consult your GP, physician, psychiatrist or any other medical professional that you are currently under the care of. I`ve made the mistake of self-regulating and stopping anti-depressants off my own back in the past and without going into detail on here, the consequences were nearly very grave.

Hi Gunkke, I didn't mean you specifically because you get your points across without coming off as abrupt or rude. So don't take this personally, I never thought you were rude to me and I wasn't thinking of you in particular when I wrote this. I was just offended that someone told me I know nothing about depression and made my own struggles with depression seem INVALID. I nearly died from depression more than once, so I thought it was presumptuous to accuse me of knowing nothing about depression. I know too much about it, from both experience and from studying it from a clinical perspective. Everyone's experience of depression is different, who is one to say mine wasn't as serious as theirs? I just happen to go about treating it in practical ways that to some might seem unorthodox because they don't involve meds. I wanted to put this potential way to help depression out there if antidepressants didn't work for some (and obviously, those on antidepressants making suicidal comments are on the wrong treatment)

I tried antidepressants in the past with consequences that almost got me hospitalized and my NHS doctor took no responsibility, she just apathetically told me she couldn't help me any longer because her solution was to completely numb me to any pain or emotion. So I had to do my own research and see how and why some people are predisposed to depression or react this way to situations that need not be so overwhelming to begin with. I think depression can be overcome with practical steps if the person truly wants to be helped. This is my opinion and it's based on personal experience so take it as you will.


And for some proof on my theory, you only need to do a basic google search for depression and deficiencies to see all the results and studies. Nothing conclusive of course, but this type of research won't ever be popular with doctors working within the pharmaceutical system because then they won't be able to prescribe antidepressants so loosely (again, speaking for myself - I was offered antidepressants at the beginning of my first visit with a therapist , twice).

 

If anyone hasn't tried to approach their depression from the nutritional aspect, then you can't really criticize this method until you attempt it. It may not cure all your issues, but in my case supplementing with vitamin D (under doctor's supervision) helped me pull myself together when I didn't think it was possible.

 

Links between vitamin D and depression: http://www.webmd.com...d-to-depression

http://www.psycholog...-and-depression

http://www.scienceda...20625152358.htm

 

Medical study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23377209 --> concluding that "our analyses are consistent with the hypothesis that low vitamin D concentration is associated with depression, and highlight the need for randomised controlled trials of vitamin D for the prevention and treatment of depression to determine whether this association is causal." It might be a chicken or egg thing for some -- i.e. depression depletes the body of vitamin D--> low vitamin D worsens depression --> & vice versa

 

Thanks Wishclean, I`m pleased to have cleared that up.:) I`m pretty sure whoever else it was was just having a bad day too and didn`t intentionally set out to invalidate your own experiences with depression. Even though I`m admittedly a little sceptical myself about the link between nutrition/vitamin deficiencies and depression, I respect and value your opinion and you have always been very supportive to me in the past on these forums. Where I do agree with you though is that anything that is proven to help/cure depression that is not a prescription drug will never be advertised by doctors working in the pharmaceutical system. Call me cynical but the reason for that is purely and simply down to the fact that it wouldn`t be in their best interests financially.



#8 WishClean

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 12:10 AM

Thanks Wishclean, I`m pleased to have cleared that up.smile.png I`m pretty sure whoever else it was was just having a bad day too and didn`t intentionally set out to invalidate your own experiences with depression. Even though I`m admittedly a little sceptical myself about the link between nutrition/vitamin deficiencies and depression, I respect and value your opinion and you have always been very supportive to me in the past on these forums. Where I do agree with you though is that anything that is proven to help/cure depression that is not a prescription drug will never be advertised by doctors working in the pharmaceutical system. Call me cynical but the reason for that is purely and simply down to the fact that it wouldn`t be in their best interests financially.

 

Yeah, that's true. Sometimes people take out their frustrations online but whatever, I was just trying to help by offering practical advice. For me, visiting therapists and doing other stuff (I even tried the tapping method but didn't stick with it long enough) wasn't as effective as coming up with practical strategies to combat depression, like going out more, being around people, spend less time online, and get some health checks. I can vouch for B vitamin and D deficiencies as helpful, at least in my case. I was skeptical too, but I had nothing to lose by trying. Anyway, I was just offering this theory as a possible option to make depression a bit more manageable. Psychologists are recommending supplements more frequently now too... one of my best friends is trying to get off anti depressants and they switched her to a lower dose and supplements (fish oil, vit. D) to ease the transition. 

And I agree about prescription antidepressants...once you are taking them, you need medical assistance on ways to either wean off or switch to something else.

 

Anyway, I hope you are doing better and are not being too hard on yourself. I think you are a useful addition to this forum and you shouldn't not participate or use it to vent. There are always blocking options if someone wants to avoid you. 


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#9 Bodie81

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:57 AM

Thanks Wishclean, I`m pleased to have cleared that up.smile.png I`m pretty sure whoever else it was was just having a bad day too and didn`t intentionally set out to invalidate your own experiences with depression. Even though I`m admittedly a little sceptical myself about the link between nutrition/vitamin deficiencies and depression, I respect and value your opinion and you have always been very supportive to me in the past on these forums. Where I do agree with you though is that anything that is proven to help/cure depression that is not a prescription drug will never be advertised by doctors working in the pharmaceutical system. Call me cynical but the reason for that is purely and simply down to the fact that it wouldn`t be in their best interests financially.

 

Yeah, that's true. Sometimes people take out their frustrations online but whatever, I was just trying to help by offering practical advice. For me, visiting therapists and doing other stuff (I even tried the tapping method but didn't stick with it long enough) wasn't as effective as coming up with practical strategies to combat depression, like going out more, being around people, spend less time online, and get some health checks. I can vouch for B vitamin and D deficiencies as helpful, at least in my case. I was skeptical too, but I had nothing to lose by trying. Anyway, I was just offering this theory as a possible option to make depression a bit more manageable. Psychologists are recommending supplements more frequently now too... one of my best friends is trying to get off anti depressants and they switched her to a lower dose and supplements (fish oil, vit. D) to ease the transition. 

And I agree about prescription antidepressants...once you are taking them, you need medical assistance on ways to either wean off or switch to something else.

 

Anyway, I hope you are doing better and are not being too hard on yourself. I think you are a useful addition to this forum and you shouldn't not participate or use it to vent. There are always blocking options if someone wants to avoid you. 

 

Those comments do appear to have upset you unfortunately. I know it`s no excuse but the person concerned was probably under a great deal of duress at the time and I`m sure that in their normal frame of mind they wouldn`t have made such comments and definitely would not have wanted to invalidate your own depression. As I`ve found out myself recently, sometimes it pays not to say anything online or anywhere else for that matter when you are feeling irrational. However, please don`t think that your advice and suggestions aren`t appreciated though because I`m sure that for the majority of people, they are.:)

 

This may sound ironic and a little hypocritical, but I`m really not sure that anti-depressants are working that great for me right now. I started taking Citalopram two months ago and ever since then, I`ve become more and more depressed, my behaviour has been very erratic and my thoughts and feelings have become more and more irrational. It`s cost me a great deal and on Friday night/Saturday morning, things got so bad that I had to go to A&E. For the time being I`m still on anti-depressants and I`ve doubled my dosage of Citalopram and I`m also taking Temazepam to aid me with sleeping. It remains to be seen if they help in the long term. Whatever happens, they are not the ultimate answer - the only way to figure everything out will be to look within and get assistance with that through talking therapies such as ongoing counselling.

 

I`m doing a little better thanks and although I`ve made a trillion mistakes, made a bit of a fool of myself and lost a friend, what`s done is done and I do know that the time for reflection is now over. It`s what I do from here on in that counts. I was thinking of not posting on these forums again but I`ve had some reassurance that it`s not a problem and I`m grateful for that. It`s a good place to come for support and due to my unfortunately lengthy experiences of both acne and depression over the years, I`d like to think that I`m also able to lend moral support too. Everything appears to be amicable now so I don`t think blocking anyone needs to be done. For the other party who was involved, I just hope they are safe and sooner rather than later get the support and help they need.



#10 WishClean

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:36 AM

 

Thanks Wishclean, I`m pleased to have cleared that up.smile.png I`m pretty sure whoever else it was was just having a bad day too and didn`t intentionally set out to invalidate your own experiences with depression. Even though I`m admittedly a little sceptical myself about the link between nutrition/vitamin deficiencies and depression, I respect and value your opinion and you have always been very supportive to me in the past on these forums. Where I do agree with you though is that anything that is proven to help/cure depression that is not a prescription drug will never be advertised by doctors working in the pharmaceutical system. Call me cynical but the reason for that is purely and simply down to the fact that it wouldn`t be in their best interests financially.

 

Yeah, that's true. Sometimes people take out their frustrations online but whatever, I was just trying to help by offering practical advice. For me, visiting therapists and doing other stuff (I even tried the tapping method but didn't stick with it long enough) wasn't as effective as coming up with practical strategies to combat depression, like going out more, being around people, spend less time online, and get some health checks. I can vouch for B vitamin and D deficiencies as helpful, at least in my case. I was skeptical too, but I had nothing to lose by trying. Anyway, I was just offering this theory as a possible option to make depression a bit more manageable. Psychologists are recommending supplements more frequently now too... one of my best friends is trying to get off anti depressants and they switched her to a lower dose and supplements (fish oil, vit. D) to ease the transition. 

And I agree about prescription antidepressants...once you are taking them, you need medical assistance on ways to either wean off or switch to something else.

 

Anyway, I hope you are doing better and are not being too hard on yourself. I think you are a useful addition to this forum and you shouldn't not participate or use it to vent. There are always blocking options if someone wants to avoid you. 

 

Those comments do appear to have upset you unfortunately. I know it`s no excuse but the person concerned was probably under a great deal of duress at the time and I`m sure that in their normal frame of mind they wouldn`t have made such comments and definitely would not have wanted to invalidate your own depression. As I`ve found out myself recently, sometimes it pays not to say anything online or anywhere else for that matter when you are feeling irrational. However, please don`t think that your advice and suggestions aren`t appreciated though because I`m sure that for the majority of people, they are.smile.png

 

This may sound ironic and a little hypocritical, but I`m really not sure that anti-depressants are working that great for me right now. I started taking Citalopram two months ago and ever since then, I`ve become more and more depressed, my behaviour has been very erratic and my thoughts and feelings have become more and more irrational. It`s cost me a great deal and on Friday night/Saturday morning, things got so bad that I had to go to A&E. For the time being I`m still on anti-depressants and I`ve doubled my dosage of Citalopram and I`m also taking Temazepam to aid me with sleeping. It remains to be seen if they help in the long term. Whatever happens, they are not the ultimate answer - the only way to figure everything out will be to look within and get assistance with that through talking therapies such as ongoing counselling.

 

I`m doing a little better thanks and although I`ve made a trillion mistakes, made a bit of a fool of myself and lost a friend, what`s done is done and I do know that the time for reflection is now over. It`s what I do from here on in that counts. I was thinking of not posting on these forums again but I`ve had some reassurance that it`s not a problem and I`m grateful for that. It`s a good place to come for support and due to my unfortunately lengthy experiences of both acne and depression over the years, I`d like to think that I`m also able to lend moral support too. Everything appears to be amicable now so I don`t think blocking anyone needs to be done. For the other party who was involved, I just hope they are safe and sooner rather than later get the support and help they need.

 

Yes, you are right. I didn't mean to offend or be condescending to anyone, I was just trying to help by offering an alternative course of treatment because it was obvious to me that the mainstream approach wasn't working for that person (why would they make suicide references otherwise?). Anyway, I only commented out of concern and also because I wanted to give you some encouragement when you were feeling down. I'm usually blunt and straightforward, and I guess it can be misinterpreted for being insensitive. I truly hope both you and your friend find the help you deserve, with whatever means you choose to do so. If anything is helping you at this point, who am I to judge the method if the end result is positive? grinwink.gif 

I do think that sometimes motivational speeches are cliched and pure BS, but for me it really helps to put things into perspective and appreciate how fortunate I am compared to less fortunate people (even if it's just because I have a roof over my head which I don't want to take for granted). Volunteering is also a good way to shift the focus from personal issues and concentrate on helping others...again, it sounds cliched but it can really put things into perspective or at least get you out of your head temporarily. 

 

Well, I hope you can at least find a good therapist you can trust and who is receptive to other approaches besides anti-depressants/ in addition to anti-depressants. And also, sometimes you just have to forget about the past and move on. You already apologized to your friend and to me it sounded very sincere, so I don't know how else you can make amends at this point. You tried at least. I drove away someone who cared about me a year and a half ago (right before this acne ordeal resurfaced) and if I hadn't dwelled on it for so long I truly think I would have been in a better mental place. But at some point, you just have to let things go.... which can be difficult if you are an analytical & reflective person like me. 


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#11 Bodie81

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:01 PM

I think that everyone is different and what works for some people may not necessarily work for other people. I already have counselling in place through my employer and although I only have a few sessions left, I`ve already been given the contact details of a low cost private counselling service which is affordable so I`ll be able to continue with counselling for the medium to long term. I`ve also been advised that at some point I`ll be contacted to go in for an assessment to attend a day hospital. I`ve done that in the past and usually you get assigned a CPN who monitors you and you can attend various different types of recreational and discussion groups. I volunteer in a shop at the weekend but my counsellor thinks that I have the knowledge, personality and aptitude to at some point work in some sort of peer support role for a fellow MH sufferer. Maybe not right now but at some point in the future it`s something I`d maybe consider doing because I`d be giving something back. Anyway sorry for rambling. As you can see I do have a few things up my sleeve which I hope will help me to come through this current phase.

 

The counsellor I see can be pretty blunt and to the point but she has suggested a couple of things that I have found helpful. For example, she recommended that I watch a couple of videos by Brene Brown on YouTube on vulnerability and shame. Watched both of them earlier today and they were both quite thought provoking and insightful. I`ve said enough about a certain situation already so I`m not going to go there again - it`s in the past now. Needless to say that like you, I am a reflective and analytical person too so I tend to find it hard to let things go. However difficult it is though you do at some point have to move on and take on board any lessons that you have learned.



#12 WishClean

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 02:12 PM

It sounds like you are taking all the right steps, I really hope things get better for you soon. I can't even tell you how many times I sabotaged myself for setting my standards too high and feeling disappointed by other people & myself too easily. Now I just think that the point of living is to overcome those things because in the end they just weigh us down and lead to a vicous cycle of self-destruction. I see people who have much less than me being perfectly content with their lives and truly happy, so I'm trying not to overanalyze every single thing that goes wrong in my life or every criticism I get (which in my line of work is inevitable). Sometimes I just have to say "whatever" and move on. That makes my life so much easier and takes some of the pressure off from trying to be good at everything and please everyone.

I think that everyone is different and what works for some people may not necessarily work for other people. I already have counselling in place through my employer and although I only have a few sessions left, I`ve already been given the contact details of a low cost private counselling service which is affordable so I`ll be able to continue with counselling for the medium to long term. I`ve also been advised that at some point I`ll be contacted to go in for an assessment to attend a day hospital. I`ve done that in the past and usually you get assigned a CPN who monitors you and you can attend various different types of recreational and discussion groups. I volunteer in a shop at the weekend but my counsellor thinks that I have the knowledge, personality and aptitude to at some point work in some sort of peer support role for a fellow MH sufferer. Maybe not right now but at some point in the future it`s something I`d maybe consider doing because I`d be giving something back. Anyway sorry for rambling. As you can see I do have a few things up my sleeve which I hope will help me to come through this current phase.

 

The counsellor I see can be pretty blunt and to the point but she has suggested a couple of things that I have found helpful. For example, she recommended that I watch a couple of videos by Brene Brown on YouTube on vulnerability and shame. Watched both of them earlier today and they were both quite thought provoking and insightful. I`ve said enough about a certain situation already so I`m not going to go there again - it`s in the past now. Needless to say that like you, I am a reflective and analytical person too so I tend to find it hard to let things go. However difficult it is though you do at some point have to move on and take on board any lessons that you have learned.


Edited by WishClean, 15 January 2014 - 02:13 PM.

Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#13 Bodie81

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:52 PM

Thanks, I hope I`m taking the right steps and I hope things do get better soon. I`m at home now and no longer have my sister to look out for me so just hope I`ll be okay. I don`t want to do it if I don`t have to but I do have the number for the crisis resolution team if I have another meltdown like on Friday/Saturday. Maybe setting more realistic standards is a good way of preventing yourself being disappointed in other people. Trying not to over analyse things and move on when things go wrong instead of dwelling on things does indeed sound as though it makes life easier. If you can also learn from those experiences and put those lessons to use in the future, that is even better.

 

Certainly think I`ve learnt a lot of lessons in the past few weeks and hopefully the mistakes that I`ve made will not be repeated again. Hopefully there`ll be opportunities for me to meet and make new friends in the future once I`m feeling a little better and doing more socially. Regarding the friend that I`ve lost, I realise that there is no going back after all that has happened. They didn`t seem to be in a great place when they posted on here on Saturday evening and I really hope that they are okay. We were a support for each other for a long time and all that I hope is that if they are struggling in any way, there are people out there looking out for and supporting them.

 

It sounds like you are taking all the right steps, I really hope things get better for you soon. I can't even tell you how many times I sabotaged myself for setting my standards too high and feeling disappointed by other people & myself too easily. Now I just think that the point of living is to overcome those things because in the end they just weigh us down and lead to a vicous cycle of self-destruction. I see people who have much less than me being perfectly content with their lives and truly happy, so I'm trying not to overanalyze every single thing that goes wrong in my life or every criticism I get (which in my line of work is inevitable). Sometimes I just have to say "whatever" and move on. That makes my life so much easier and takes some of the pressure off from trying to be good at everything and please everyone.



#14 CelloIsLove

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 07:51 AM

It's amazing to me to see that many people don't believe the mind/body connection. It's absolutely illogical, considering that the brain is part of your body, and your brain is where your emotions come from. It's not a debate. It's not a belief. It's simply the way things are, scientifically, and not "believing" it is like saying you don't believe the sky is blue. You can go around "not believing it" all you want, but it simply is so.

 

That being said, diet/lifestyle has done wonders for my mental health. Stress is a killer, and can be devastating for your skin. Eating a nutrient dense diet, getting sunshine, and moving my body a lot has changed my whole outlook. Instead of spiraling downward with depression, eating disorders, and obsessive behavior, I am happy, calm and focused.

 

Finally, obsessing over your diet to an unhealthy level can also be devastating. That's why I am so passionate about the Paleo lifestyle, which is called by the media a "fad diet", but obviously it's not. It's simply a different lifestyle and a different food pyramid. Instead of starving yourself, obsessing over juices and cleanses, and NEVER allowing yourself to veer off your path, just eat real food and be happy. Simple as that.

 

Also, eat liver. Liver is some of the most nutrient dense stuff on the planet.


I'm CelloIsLove.

 

Here's the problem I see:

People want to heal their acne through diet and lifestyle. Great. But then they get obsessed only with their skin and not how they FEEL. Physically. Emotionally. What is the quality of your life? It's not directly connected to your flesh, I can tell you that. Then obsess over their food. They hear "diet" and think low-fat, juicing, fasting, cleansing, starving. You're young. Do you really think you have liver failure? Do you really think you need more fiber?

Paleo changed my life. It's the only lifestyle that ever helped me-not just with my skin, but with my life. My happiness. My fitness. It says, "Eat good quality meats. Eat lots of veggies. Eat fruit too. Some nuts. Then go outside. Walk around. See the world. Play with friends. Lift heavy things. Get some sun. Then go sleep, wake up and do it again." What that means to me is to live an enjoyable, happy, dynamic life where I can be the best me for the people I love, not anxious, not angry, not depressed.

Be gentle to your skin, your heart, your tummy, and your life.

Get out there and live.

And also eat bacon.


#15 WishClean

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 07:53 PM

Plain and straightforward blog about nutritional deficiencies and their impact on neurotransmitters. http://www.healthy-h...depression.html  


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

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** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#16 bubbles55

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 09:35 PM

It's amazing to me to see that many people don't believe the mind/body connection. It's absolutely illogical, considering that the brain is part of your body, and your brain is where your emotions come from. It's not a debate. It's not a belief. It's simply the way things are, scientifically, and not "believing" it is like saying you don't believe the sky is blue. You can go around "not believing it" all you want, but it simply is so.

 

That being said, diet/lifestyle has done wonders for my mental health. Stress is a killer, and can be devastating for your skin. Eating a nutrient dense diet, getting sunshine, and moving my body a lot has changed my whole outlook. Instead of spiraling downward with depression, eating disorders, and obsessive behavior, I am happy, calm and focused.

 

Finally, obsessing over your diet to an unhealthy level can also be devastating. That's why I am so passionate about the Paleo lifestyle, which is called by the media a "fad diet", but obviously it's not. It's simply a different lifestyle and a different food pyramid. Instead of starving yourself, obsessing over juices and cleanses, and NEVER allowing yourself to veer off your path, just eat real food and be happy. Simple as that.

 

Also, eat liver. Liver is some of the most nutrient dense stuff on the planet.

 

Stress is only correlated with acne breakouts, not causative. I have never experienced any worsening of my acne even during the single most stressful and emotionally devastating periods of my life the effect of stress on my acne was virtually non existent, if anything my skin was a bit better. Everyone is different.

 

I'm not a firm believer in the mind body connection. I watched my aunt die a horrific death from an aggressive form of bladder cancer and her attitude was incredibly positive but she still succumbed to the disease. If the mind and body connection was so strong wouldn't her great mental attitude be able to heal her cancer? NOPE.



#17 WishClean

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 10:23 PM

It's amazing to me to see that many people don't believe the mind/body connection. It's absolutely illogical, considering that the brain is part of your body, and your brain is where your emotions come from. It's not a debate. It's not a belief. It's simply the way things are, scientifically, and not "believing" it is like saying you don't believe the sky is blue. You can go around "not believing it" all you want, but it simply is so.

 

That being said, diet/lifestyle has done wonders for my mental health. Stress is a killer, and can be devastating for your skin. Eating a nutrient dense diet, getting sunshine, and moving my body a lot has changed my whole outlook. Instead of spiraling downward with depression, eating disorders, and obsessive behavior, I am happy, calm and focused.

 

Finally, obsessing over your diet to an unhealthy level can also be devastating. That's why I am so passionate about the Paleo lifestyle, which is called by the media a "fad diet", but obviously it's not. It's simply a different lifestyle and a different food pyramid. Instead of starving yourself, obsessing over juices and cleanses, and NEVER allowing yourself to veer off your path, just eat real food and be happy. Simple as that.

 

Also, eat liver. Liver is some of the most nutrient dense stuff on the planet.

 

Stress is only correlated with acne breakouts, not causative. I have never experienced any worsening of my acne even during the single most stressful and emotionally devastating periods of my life the effect of stress on my acne was virtually non existent, if anything my skin was a bit better. Everyone is different.

 

I'm not a firm believer in the mind body connection. I watched my aunt die a horrific death from an aggressive form of bladder cancer and her attitude was incredibly positive but she still succumbed to the disease. If the mind and body connection was so strong wouldn't her great mental attitude be able to heal her cancer? NOPE.

erm hello, the brain is part of the body. If the brain dies, the body dies. 


Supplements: inositol, DIM, digestive enzymes [don't need them every day anymore, only on cheat days], herpanacine & vitamin C with rose hips [not every day], regular sun exposure for vitamin D3.

Lifestyle & Skin Care: Low histamine diet, avoiding unnecessary stress, balancing skin's PH (using Image Ormedics), using distilled/ filtered water to wash face, occasional high frequency facials... (although I have been slacking lately)

** Find the cause, find the cure **

 


#18 k3tchup

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 06:40 PM

It's amazing to me to see that many people don't believe the mind/body connection. It's absolutely illogical, considering that the brain is part of your body, and your brain is where your emotions come from. It's not a debate. It's not a belief. It's simply the way things are, scientifically, and not "believing" it is like saying you don't believe the sky is blue. You can go around "not believing it" all you want, but it simply is so.

 

That being said, diet/lifestyle has done wonders for my mental health. Stress is a killer, and can be devastating for your skin. Eating a nutrient dense diet, getting sunshine, and moving my body a lot has changed my whole outlook. Instead of spiraling downward with depression, eating disorders, and obsessive behavior, I am happy, calm and focused.

 

Finally, obsessing over your diet to an unhealthy level can also be devastating. That's why I am so passionate about the Paleo lifestyle, which is called by the media a "fad diet", but obviously it's not. It's simply a different lifestyle and a different food pyramid. Instead of starving yourself, obsessing over juices and cleanses, and NEVER allowing yourself to veer off your path, just eat real food and be happy. Simple as that.

 

Also, eat liver. Liver is some of the most nutrient dense stuff on the planet.

 

Stress is only correlated with acne breakouts, not causative. I have never experienced any worsening of my acne even during the single most stressful and emotionally devastating periods of my life the effect of stress on my acne was virtually non existent, if anything my skin was a bit better. Everyone is different.

 

I'm not a firm believer in the mind body connection. I watched my aunt die a horrific death from an aggressive form of bladder cancer and her attitude was incredibly positive but she still succumbed to the disease. If the mind and body connection was so strong wouldn't her great mental attitude be able to heal her cancer? NOPE.

This is different. Her view of cancer didn't cause her to become a recluse or be mad at life or asking "why her" she instead focused her energy elsewhere resulting in positive emotion as you state. It was a better way to live then knowing you have a fatal disease. And with bladder and kidney cancers by the time you notice symptoms is already "too late" for most people. That is because by that time it has infiltrated regional lymph nodes and possibly metastized to other organs such as the liver and lungs. My girlfriend's mother died of bladder cancer. Very harsh to hear the stories even for me. But her mother and family kept strong.

 

You are looking at the mind/body connection differently or from the wrong point. If anything she had a great connection acknowledging the disease but living life positively to the end. 


A nurse is not what you do, its what you are..I am a nurse: its not what i do, its what i am.

 





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