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The Evolutionary Biology Behind Acne


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#61 dylonspythotfyre

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 11:37 AM

Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 

A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.

 

That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 

 

People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence against it.

 

There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.

 

That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.


Edited by dylonspythotfyre, 20 January 2014 - 11:37 AM.


#62 alternativista

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:48 PM

Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 

A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.

 

That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 

 

>People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence against it.

 

There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.

 

That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.

 

 

All that is true. Except the argument going on in this thread is that allergies are the sole cause of the inflammation that causes cancer, most other degenerative health conditions & acne.  When in reality there are numerous inflammatory processes going on that have nothing to do with allergic responce.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#63 dylonspythotfyre

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 02:51 PM

 

Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 

A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.

 

That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 

 

>People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence again

st it.

 

There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.

 

That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.

 

All that is true. Except the argument going on in this thread is that allergies are the sole cause of the inflammation that causes cancer, most other degenerative health conditions & acne.  When in reality there are numerous inflammatory processes going on that have nothing to do with allergic responce.

 

 

Ooooh. Gotchya. Yah I would not go so far as to say that allergies are the sole cause of inflammation in the human. I would agree with you that inflammatory processes are numerous and diverse.



#64 Quetzlcoatl

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 03:03 PM

Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 

A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.

 

That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 

 

>People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence against it.

 

There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.

 

That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.

 

 

Yes, you're exactly right. Food allergies do indeed contribute to the tissue environment required to encourage cancerous cell growth, but they are not the sole contributor, which is what was being argued. What I was trying to get at was really that preventing cancer isn't as simple as avoiding allergenic foods; your metabolism itself is one of the largest contributors to tissue damage (and thus inflammation). People should know that it simply isn't enough to avoid allergens; rather we must also acquire beneficial nutrients from the foods we eat to protect ourselves from...well, ourselves.



#65 SDR WellnessCoach

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 04:47 PM


Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 
A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.
 
That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 
 
>

>People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence against it.

>
 
There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.
 
That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.
 
 
Yes, you're exactly right. Food allergies do indeed contribute to the tissue environment required to encourage cancerous cell growth, but they are not the sole contributor, which is what was being argued. What I was trying to get at was really that preventing cancer isn't as simple as avoiding allergenic foods; your metabolism itself is one of the largest contributors to tissue damage (and thus inflammation). People should know that it simply isn't enough to avoid allergens; rather we must also acquire beneficial nutrients from the foods we eat to protect ourselves from...well, ourselves.

I could post a link to a pharmaceutical company proudly talking about the new cancer drug which they just happen to mention the cause of cancer in it which is what I am trying to convey to you. You won't believe me and you would not believe the Ohio State University that published it because you, like everybody else, are waiting for a confession to come out from a business that is making too much money to ever do that.

I will tell you this. They don't hide it from us, they assume we will never put it together. Except for me and a few others that did.
"Genetics load the gun, environment pulls the trigger"

#66 Quetzlcoatl

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 05:41 PM

I have no clue what you're talking about. Feel free to elucidate.



#67 alternativista

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 06:59 PM


Well I've given you guys all the information I can. You can keep denying it but until I see evidence I won't be convinced. I, as a scientist, have embraced many aspects of holistic medicine. However, we should also aim to keep a certain level of scientific integrity. Some of the things that have been said in this thread are way off base; there's literally no evidence for more than one or two cancers being caused by allergies, and to say otherwise is a truly ridiculous assertion.

 
A lot of the stuff in the diet/holistic medicine threads is hokus pokus mumbjo jumbo.  Most of the people base their assertions on a book they read a long time ago, on a blog they found through a google search, or they just base their assertions on the fact that they know a really smart person.
 
That being said, I would not argue that allergies cause cancers. However, I would argue that chronic exposure to foods which cause allergies will lead to chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation does cause cancer. 
 
>

>People should be more careful of assuming that correlation is equivalent to causation. For example; there are some cancers that are correlated with autoimmune diseases. Do they both have the same cause? Maybe, but it's more likely that an improperly functioning immune system is simply unable to destroy cancer cells that arise as an outcome of normal functions, and indeed there is ample evidence for this. As in, the cancer is not an outcome of 'allergy', but rather of autoimmunity, which itself can be the outcome of 'allergy'. But even then, these are a minority of cases. Lung cancer in smokers is not caused by soybean 'allergy'. That simply isn't logical; not only is there no evidence in favor of this claim, but there is also an abundance of evidence against it.

>
 
There are certain autoimmune conditions where I would agree. There are a number of tumor-suppressing genes expressed as part of the immune system and dis-regulation of these genes or their protein product can in fact lead to an cellular environment where cancer is allowed to develop.
 
That being said, I would once again argue that autoimmune diseases where the body attacks itself will create an environment of chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation can cause cancer. In a chronic inflammatory reaction, there will be recruitment of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and hydrolytic enzymes. This creates a mutagenic environment which can cause cancer to develop.
 
 
Yes, you're exactly right. Food allergies do indeed contribute to the tissue environment required to encourage cancerous cell growth, but they are not the sole contributor, which is what was being argued. What I was trying to get at was really that preventing cancer isn't as simple as avoiding allergenic foods; your metabolism itself is one of the largest contributors to tissue damage (and thus inflammation). People should know that it simply isn't enough to avoid allergens; rather we must also acquire beneficial nutrients from the foods we eat to protect ourselves from...well, ourselves.

Such as the post prandial affects of a high glycemic load meal or drink. Which also has a huge impact on acne.
Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#68 dylonspythotfyre

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 02:07 AM

Yes, you're exactly right. Food allergies do indeed contribute to the tissue environment required to encourage cancerous cell growth, but they are not the sole contributor, which is what was being argued. What I was trying to get at was really that preventing cancer isn't as simple as avoiding allergenic foods; your metabolism itself is one of the largest contributors to tissue damage (and thus inflammation). People should know that it simply isn't enough to avoid allergens; rather we must also acquire beneficial nutrients from the foods we eat to protect ourselves from...well, ourselves.

 

Yah I missed the part about allergies being the sole contributor. By no means are they the sole contributor.

 

 

I could post a link to a pharmaceutical company proudly talking about the new cancer drug which they just happen to mention the cause of cancer in it which is what I am trying to convey to you. You won't believe me and you would not believe the Ohio State University that published it because you, like everybody else, are waiting for a confession to come out from a business that is making too much money to ever do that.


I will tell you this. They don't hide it from us, they assume we will never put it together. Except for me and a few others that did.

 

I don't really want the link, thank you though. But I would love to know whether the "insensitivities" that people talk about are IgG or IgE insensitivities. Quetzlcoatl, I'd be particularly interested to know whether your food "allergy" test was for IgG or IgE. Was it a blood test?

 

 

Such as the post prandial affects of a high glycemic load meal or drink. Which also has a huge impact on acne.

 

I would agree that the postprandial effects of high glycemic foods can induce an environment that encourages cancer development.

 

However, I am still not 100% convinced that high-glycemic indexed foods have a significant impact on acne. What would you say about a baked russet potato with a glycemic index of 111 whereas pure glucose has a glycemic index of 100?



#69 Quetzlcoatl

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:01 AM

 

I could post a link to a pharmaceutical company proudly talking about the new cancer drug which they just happen to mention the cause of cancer in it which is what I am trying to convey to you. You won't believe me and you would not believe the Ohio State University that published it because you, like everybody else, are waiting for a confession to come out from a business that is making too much money to ever do that.


I will tell you this. They don't hide it from us, they assume we will never put it together. Except for me and a few others that did.

 

I don't really want the link, thank you though. But I would love to know whether the "insensitivities" that people talk about are IgG or IgE insensitivities. Quetzlcoatl, I'd be particularly interested to know whether your food "allergy" test was for IgG or IgE. Was it a blood test?

 

It was IgE and IgA if I remember correctly...though it was a while ago so I could be wrong. I had a whole bunch of IgA reactions but not a single IgE, which seems to reflect my experiences. It was a blood test.

 

Edit: Nevermind it was probably IgG and IgE, seeing as how IgA isn't really used. I did get IgA for gliadin, though.


Edited by Quetzlcoatl, 21 January 2014 - 07:53 AM.


#70 alternativista

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:26 AM


Yes, you're exactly right. Food allergies do indeed contribute to the tissue environment required to encourage cancerous cell growth, but they are not the sole contributor, which is what was being argued. What I was trying to get at was really that preventing cancer isn't as simple as avoiding allergenic foods; your metabolism itself is one of the largest contributors to tissue damage (and thus inflammation). People should know that it simply isn't enough to avoid allergens; rather we must also acquire beneficial nutrients from the foods we eat to protect ourselves from...well, ourselves.

 
Yah I missed the part about allergies being the sole contributor. By no means are they the sole contributor.
 
 

I could post a link to a pharmaceutical company proudly talking about the new cancer drug which they just happen to mention the cause of cancer in it which is what I am trying to convey to you. You won't believe me and you would not believe the Ohio State University that published it because you, like everybody else, are waiting for a confession to come out from a business that is making too much money to ever do that.

I will tell you this. They don't hide it from us, they assume we will never put it together. Except for me and a few others that did.

 
I don't really want the link, thank you though. But I would love to know whether the "insensitivities" that people talk about are IgG or IgE insensitivities. Quetzlcoatl, I'd be particularly interested to know whether your food "allergy" test was for IgG or IgE. Was it a blood test?
 
 

Such as the post prandial affects of a high glycemic load meal or drink. Which also has a huge impact on acne.

 
I would agree that the postprandial effects of high glycemic foods can induce an environment that encourages cancer development.
 
However, I am still not 100% convinced that high-glycemic indexed foods have a significant impact on acne. What would you say about a baked russet potato with a glycemic index of 111 whereas pure glucose has a glycemic index of 100?
I would remind you that it's the glycemic load of the meal that is the issue. The glycemic index doesn't effect acne. The glycemic impact of meal habits does.

Edited by alternativista, 21 January 2014 - 07:28 AM.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#71 dylonspythotfyre

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 12:11 PM

It was IgE and IgA if I remember correctly...though it was a while ago so I could be wrong. I had a whole bunch of IgA reactions but not a single IgE, which seems to reflect my experiences. It was a blood test.

 

Edit: Nevermind it was probably IgG and IgE, seeing as how IgA isn't really used. I did get IgA for gliadin, though.

 

My mother and some of my siblings recently got their blood drawn from a naturopath for this purpose. The labs gave IgG and IgE results, but the labs did not indicate which foods were IgG tested and which were IgE. There was a blanket statement that some of the foods are tested for IgE and most are tested for IgG, but no specifics. Which is strange to me because IgE is the only histamine inducing antibody that promotes an allergic reaction.

 

 

I would remind you that it's the glycemic load of the meal that is the issue. The glycemic index doesn't effect acne. The glycemic impact of meal habits does.

 

 

Yah I was just reading about glycemic load vs. index last night. I had never been previously aware that there were two types of numbers let alone the difference between the two.  And I had always thought that the index value was the one that mattered. I guess I will have to do a little more reading.



#72 dscully

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:24 AM

I've (relatively) recently discovered the impact that the glycemic load of my food has on my acne. I've noticed that starchy vegetables like potatoes have little impact, particularly if eaten with fat, but that straight dairy (a big glass of milk) and processed sugars have the most impact, triggering a major breakout after only 12 or so hours. I also don't do well when I am eating bread, so I have left bread as only an occasional treat that I am sure to eat with a sort of fat like butter to lower the GI so it doesn't hit me all at once. I cannot eat sugar. Ever. Dessert is not an option, and I also can't eat bananas or drink orange juice unless it is freshly juiced. There is something about storebought juice that sets me off, which is fine because I don't fancy storebought juice anyway.

I also juice, and drink several pints of vegetable juice every day. My usual mix is two beets, 10 carrots, one apple, and four stalks of celery. I drink this throughout the day, and my skin has been really looking fantastic. I know that carrots have a good bit of sugar, and was initially wary of drinking them in juice, but I have found them to have a very anti-inflammatory affect on my skin in general, even being what my fiance calls my "anti-venom" that I consume after eating something I shouldn't, since I can drink a pint of carrot juice before eating a piece of pizza and the pizza has no effect on my skin. I don't do this often, though. I don't want to push my luck, and I'm very superstitious.


Edited by dscully, 23 January 2014 - 10:25 AM.

Suffered from acne as a young adult that went into remission when put on hormonal birth control. Went off the HBC around age 22 and the acne returned with a vengeance (along with a host of other hormonal complaints). 100% clear with a modified diet that excludes dairy, sugars, grains, citrus and cured meats and emphasizes whole food-based nutrition from both plant and animal sources, most notably organ meats like liver and juiced whole vegetables. I have included a recipe for the most helpful juice I have come up with for skin complaints. I drink it every day, and it is invaluable for acne due to the large amounts of vitamin A (carotenoids) from both the carrots and beets. It also helps improve your coloring if you are very fair, giving you a pinkish, more radiant look (not orange. Don't worry!).

 

Magic Juice

 

In a juicer, combine:

 

5-6 carrots

1 medium beet

2-3 stalks of celery

1 small apple (Green is preferred. Omit if you are very sugar-sensitive)

1 small (1inch) piece of ginger (optional, but good for digestion)

 

This makes a variable amount of juice depending on the size of the vegetables you use.

Drink this throughout the morning until it's gone. Store in the fridge not longer than one day.

Having perfectly clear skin on my wedding day was worth all the headache and effort of figuring out how diet affects acne!

10253792_10152330899888950_7455033623381
 


#73 Riddled

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 07:44 PM

Great post people, hopefully it goes somewhere.

 

If i had to say either way i would say there is no one fits all "answer" for acne and certainly no "one fits all" diet.
 

Most people can eat wheat fine, many can eat dairy fine. Wheat is very bad for some people, dairy is very bad for some people. etc etc etc 

 

The dose makes the poison etc etc etc.

 

Correlation doesn't equal causation etc etc etc.

 

Also, as others have said, "healthy" and "natural" diets are relative. Just because a diet is "natural" doesn't mean it is healthy either. Just because we used to it something for ages, doesn't mean it is necessarily our optimal diet.

 

I am not educated in this subject and i gave up reading all this bs a while ago, but evolution, or whatever the correct term is, is just about survival of the genes isn't it? Ie passing them on. Does acne effect this? Is there any correlation between health and acne? I realize inflammation is part of what "causes" acne, but is the level of it any different in someone who doesn't have acne? 

 

Acne seems to be largely superficial to me, in terms of evolutionary biology, or whatever the correct term is. You can argue what effect on beauty or looks acne has, but looks doesn't seem to really have that much of an effect on gene survival now, does it? 

 

Here is a theory for you. In the past the best looking people passed their genes on but then as we became more "civilized" and "socially developed", the "uglier" members of our species started to have more of a chance to procreate and began to bugger everything up, passing on their crappy inferior genes etc.

Seriously though.


I have tried just about every diet going and none really do anything to help my skin. I seem to be able to change how my gut functions and how i poo etc but none of it correlates to my skin. I actually have no idea whatsoever what equals a "healthy" diet or not. The more i learnt about nutrition the less i understood. In general, if someone i am talking to claims to "know" about nutrition they nearly always don't because i don't actually think anyone does yet.

 

 

I think something that isn't looked into enough or considered enough when it comes to acne [and many other diseases/conditions] is the hygiene hypothesis. Others have mentioned it on here before but no one listens/cares.

Is "stuff" causing our immune systems to "overreact" [=acne] or our immune systems overreacting because of lack of stuff?

 

 

Btw if people don't want to get cancer i would start looking into moving into some kind of self sustaining way of life somewhere as far away from it all as is possible. Most people should be alright to grow wheat if they can be arsed to process it all. 


God gave us everything we need; the earth to live on, animals to feast on, vegetables to make side dishes and fruit to be eaten in moderation.

The devil put grains, beats and sugarcane on the earth to tempt us.

For approximately 2.5 million to 10,000 years ago most of us strayed away from temptation but the devils influence grew stronger and eventually we swayed to his evil ways.

God new that those whose faith was strong would never fall to temptation so he punished those who took to the pleasures of grains and sugar by not giving us the ability to digest grains and making sugar poisonous, eventually leading to all kinds of health problems including acne.

But some wanted there cake and to eat it too, free of health problems, so they made a pact with the devil and sold their soul's for acne free skin.

We see these people consuming delicious breaded, dough based meals, baked goods and confectioneries but with crystal clear skin.
These people are walking with the devil!!
They are the spawn of satan!!




Paleo is the righteous path my children!!

Your faith must be strong!!

Do not fall to temptation!!







Posted Image



blind
faith
is the
key


#74 dylonspythotfyre

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:25 AM

If i had to say either way i would say there is no one fits all "answer" for acne and certainly no "one fits all" diet.

 

I certainly agree that no single diet will fit everyone. That being said, I truly believe that there is a certain, yet unknown aspect of the Western diet that is leading to chronic acne from adolescence in late adulthood. I cannot substantiate this claim, it is merely a hypothesis.

 

 

Also, as others have said, "healthy" and "natural" diets are relative. Just because a diet is "natural" doesn't mean it is healthy either. Just because we used to it something for ages, doesn't mean it is necessarily our optimal diet.

 

I very much agree with this.


 

I am not educated in this subject and i gave up reading all this bs a while ago, but evolution, or whatever the correct term is, is just about survival of the genes isn't it? Ie passing them on. Does acne effect this? Is there any correlation between health and acne? I realize inflammation is part of what "causes" acne, but is the level of it any different in someone who doesn't have acne? 

 

Surely acne is correlated to health. Pustules of white blood cells around a clogged sebaceous gland cannot be indicative of something good.

 

I can't answer the question whether inflammation is different in someone who doesn't have acne (assuming the two people have more or less similar diets and environmental exposures/stress) because I don't know the root cause of acne.

 


Acne seems to be largely superficial to me, in terms of evolutionary biology, or whatever the correct term is. You can argue what effect on beauty or looks acne has, but looks doesn't seem to really have that much of an effect on gene survival now, does it? 

 

My guess (again speculation) is that acne has a tremendous impact on mating and an even greater impact on depression/suicidal tendencies which can absolutely effect virility and success with gene survival.

 

 

Here is a theory for you. In the past the best looking people passed their genes on but then as we became more "civilized" and "socially developed", the "uglier" members of our species started to have more of a chance to procreate and began to bugger everything up, passing on their crappy inferior genes etc.

 

I still think that attraction very much plays a role in natural selection. Low intelligence, on the other hand, seems to breed amongst people like bunny rabbits.

 

 

I have tried just about every diet going and none really do anything to help my skin. I seem to be able to change how my gut functions and how i poo etc but none of it correlates to my skin. I actually have no idea whatsoever what equals a "healthy" diet or not. The more i learnt about nutrition the less i understood. In general, if someone i am talking to claims to "know" about nutrition they nearly always don't because i don't actually think anyone does yet.

 

I agree that nutrition is not very well understood. We understand bits and pieces, but the human body is extremely complex and there are 7 billion humans each with slightly different reactions to various foods.

 

I don't really know much about nutrition. I am not an expert. But my hypothesis is that diet is the root cause of acne. While I may not be an expert in nutrition, I do know enough to experiment with various diets to see how my body responds to different foods.

 

Have you tried a diet that balances the ratio of Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids? What were the results for your acne?

 

 

I think something that isn't looked into enough or considered enough when it comes to acne [and many other diseases/conditions] is the hygiene hypothesis. Others have mentioned it on here before but no one listens/cares.

Is "stuff" causing our immune systems to "overreact" [=acne] or our immune systems overreacting because of lack of stuff?

 

The hygiene hypothesis essentially states that the number of allergies in Western societies is higher than corresponding 3rd world countries because 3rd world countries have greater exposure to pathogens and therefore have a stronger immune system. I disagree with this hypothesis and argue that 3rd world countries have fewer people with allergies because they have limited access to medicine. Without access to medicine, the people in the 3rd world countries simply die from anaphylactic shock and severe asthma attacks. Thus 3rd world people have fewer allergies because those with allergies, specifically severe allergies, simply die off.

 


Btw if people don't want to get cancer i would start looking into moving into some kind of self sustaining way of life somewhere as far away from it all as is possible. Most people should be alright to grow wheat if they can be arsed to process it all. 

 

I don't believe we should be paranoid to the point of becoming hermits and moving away from society. That being said, I think that it is relatively easy to make conscientious decisions about the types of things we put inside our body.

 

Edited by dylonspythotfyre, 24 January 2014 - 04:50 AM.


#75 13yearsofAcne

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 10:02 AM

For what it's worth I theorize that acne is some sort of evolutionary consequence of humans becoming increasingly hairless. Every single acne spot centres around a hair follicle. You will never get acne where you don't have hair (palms and soles) or where the hair is really thick (scalp, armpits etc). Acne only ever seems to affect semi-haired skin...

 

You can eat as much crap as you want, rub sebum on your skin all day, grow bacteria cultures on your skin, get the skin as dry, inflamed and hyperkeratinized as you like, but you will never ever get acne vulgaris on the palms of your hands or your scalp...


Edited by 13yearsofAcne, 15 February 2014 - 10:05 AM.


#76 Dolan Duck

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 10:16 AM

13yearsofacne, you must be the biggest troll of the year. Scalp acne is VERY COMMON. Acne appears on the areas of body where the sebaceous glands are most dense, like face, chest, back and scalp.


Edited by Dolan Duck, 15 February 2014 - 10:27 AM.


#77 13yearsofAcne

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:43 AM

If you can provide evidence to support your assertion that scalp acne is VERY COMMON I would be very grateful.



#78 Dolan Duck

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:50 AM

Just google "scalp acne". I still can't believe that you are not trolling..



#79 13yearsofAcne

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:58 AM

I could not find any reliable information on the prevalence of scalp acne on Google...

 

Maybe you are confusing acne vulgaris with folliculitis or dermatitis?


Edited by 13yearsofAcne, 15 February 2014 - 12:00 PM.


#80 Dolan Duck

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 12:06 PM

You can find information about it even on acne.org, http://www.acne.org/scalp-acne.html






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