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Do You Suffer From Accutane Hair Loss? Read This!

accutane hair loss scalp burning itchy scalp erectile dysfunction hair thinning seborrhea eyebrow shedding autoimune disease

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#1 Robert1000

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 04:29 PM

Accutane can cause massive shedding.

If you experience that, and you are a guy, here's how you can slow down the shedding :

- take Saw Palmetto (it slowed down my hair loss from 200+ hair/day to 20-30/day

- take vitamin D3 (im taking about 5000i.u./EOD.....it dries my hair alot, and lowers the itchy scalp, and lowers the hair loss up to a point, but doesnt stop it)

 

Here's a connection i tried to make about Accutane hair loss and hormones :

 

I, for example, also got E.D. from Accutane. My sperm nowadays is watery. Highly likely to be infertile, like many others who used Accutane.

From my blood work i can see that accutane has lowered the Testosterone level (T) (by 40% in my case) and rise the estradiol (E2) (up to highest level)

From my research, i realised that androgens (T & DHT) cause acne. Estrogen supplimentation is known to clear acne. So, maybe the rise in E2 and drop in T = no or less acne.

People who have high T, have very oily skin , therefore severe acne ! And people with high T have thick hair and acne (it also depends on each male sensitivity to androgens).

By dropping the T, we never regain the same oil production as before, so, for some of us, that causes hair loss, because hair doesnt receive enough "food".

Accutane is an anti-androgen, it lowers T, therefore the oil production lowers, and in some cases, that causes hair fragility, thinning, and loss.

Low T is also associated with hair thinning and hair loss. (its said on many medical articles)

I see that i've got, as many of you, the symptoms of hypogonadism : hair loss, dry skin, bone problems, depression, erectile disfunction (E.D.), etc.

 

Im sorry for my english, i hope you can understand my point of view, which is "low testosterone, high estradiol, low DHT = erectile disfunction + hair loss"

 

Think well. The first shedding period during which u loose tons of hair may be due to accutane poisones. But, if after 6 months or even 1 year you are still shedding, something is really wrong with you and Accutane really messed up something inside you.

This is just my theory, and it makes sense somehow, if you do your research.

 

I'm going to do some unortodox approaches of trying to stop the hair loss. I will start TRT (testosterone replacement therapy) and see if that can stop the hair loss and back up my theory.

 

Do you suffer from Accutane hair loss??

Does your scalp itches and burns?

Does your hair got thinner?

Do you loose hair from other parts of your body also?

 

I don't have much time to use this forum, so, if you wanna know more about my theory, if you wanna tell me your story and talk to me about accutane hair loss, PM me and send me your email address.

Or send me a mail to this address : robydanymay@gmail.com

 

I will also try my best to read your posts on this topic and keep you updated, but maybe not as often, as i'm kinda busy lately.

 

I will try to help each one of you as much as i can, and keep you updated regarding my hair loss treatments, suppliments that i try and tried, blood works which we can compare, and each one's hair loss progress. And more over, i wil tell you if TRT has stopped my hair loss of not.

Together we will find a cure for this. Let's get united.

 

Don't get me wrong. Im not a doctor (but even so, doctors know shit about this problem).

I dont sell anything to anyone of you.

Im an accutane sufferer and i wanna establish a friendship with other people who are in the same situation as me, and try to help each other, support each other.

I believe together we can fight this.

 

Goodluck to everybody and God bless you all!

 



#2 1moretime

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 07:09 PM

Thinning of the hair is definitely a known potential side effect. Part of that is attributable to the decrease in sebum which for me tends to make my hair less thick. Although you are welcome to your opinion, you can't make up your own facts and from a scientific standpoint, you're way off base.  There is no scientific literature that definitively links accutane to decreased testosterone.  Even if that was the case, it should in theory help you grow and keep hair.  One of the known side effects of taking testosterone is hair loss (increases DHT)! Propecia, a drug used to grow and keep hair, does this in part by DECREASING DHT.  

 

I don't doubt that you are experiencing hair loss. Many of us men do (naturally). And it could indeed be because of accutane but not because of the supposed decrease in testosterone and DHT!


Edited by 1moretime, 27 October 2013 - 08:18 PM.


#3 oli girl

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 09:05 PM

Thinning of the hair is definitely a known potential side effect. Part of that is attributable to the decrease in sebum which for me tends to make my hair less thick. Although you are welcome to your opinion, you can't make up your own facts and from a scientific standpoint, you're way off base.  There is no scientific literature that definitively links accutane to decreased testosterone.  Even if that was the case, it should in theory help you grow and keep hair.  One of the known side effects of taking testosterone is hair loss (increases DHT)! Propecia, a drug used to grow and keep hair, does this in part by DECREASING DHT.  

 

I don't doubt that you are experiencing hair loss. Many of us men do (naturally). And it could indeed be because of accutane but not because of the supposed decrease in testosterone and DHT!

Maybe you should read Dr.Crisler website all things male Accutane. He has actually treated many victims with sexual dysfunction due to Accutane. Also do a search on the board. Dr.Kevin Pezzi who experienced E.D. from Accutane.

 

Robert I hope things are going better :)


The secret of health for both mind & body
is not to mourn for the past, not to worry about the future, or not anticipate troubles, but to live the present moment wisely and earnestly.
The Buddha

#4 1moretime

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 09:44 PM

Oli Girl,

 

I'm confused where in my response do you think I'm questioning that he doesn't have ED? I'm not questioning whether he has Low T, what I'm challenging is his notion that is what has caused his hair loss. FYI, ED isn't always because of testosterone.



#5 Green Gables

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 12:40 PM

Thinning of the hair is definitely a known potential side effect. Part of that is attributable to the decrease in sebum which for me tends to make my hair less thick. Although you are welcome to your opinion, you can't make up your own facts and from a scientific standpoint, you're way off base.  There is no scientific literature that definitively links accutane to decreased testosterone.  Even if that was the case, it should in theory help you grow and keep hair.  One of the known side effects of taking testosterone is hair loss (increases DHT)! Propecia, a drug used to grow and keep hair, does this in part by DECREASING DHT.  

 

I don't doubt that you are experiencing hair loss. Many of us men do (naturally). And it could indeed be because of accutane but not because of the supposed decrease in testosterone and DHT!

 

Actually there have been studies showing that Accutane does in fact reduce testosterone.

 

Just go search through the dermatology journals and you'll find them. 

 

But yes, in general, we use anti-DHT therapies to stop hair loss on the scalp, although these therapies tend to increase scalp hair and reduce body hair. It's hard to say what anti-DHT does for hair in people who do not have the genetic predisposition to balding. Most women with PCOS who go on spironolactone (potent anti-androgen) say that it increases their scalp hair and reduces their body hair. These women were already starting to bald before they went on spiro. However, some women who go on spironolactone just for acne, with no hair problems, get scary hair loss from it. So there are more factors at play than just the DHT. 

 

I think there is a link between Accutane shrinking the sebaceous glands and the hair follicle...that may have more to do with OP's hair loss than the lowered testosterone. 


Edited by Green Gables, 28 October 2013 - 12:44 PM.

photo-152109.gif?_r=1345837784?__rand=0.

 

I don't get notified of your response to my post unless you QUOTE my post.

Please only quote a small portion of the post so it doesn't clutter up the thread. 

 

How to Treat Hormonal Acne

Good and Bad Birth Control Pills and Implants for Acne

How to take Spironolactone

List of Doctors Who Prescribe Spironolactone

Topicals for Hormonal Acne

 

HOW I STAY 100% CLEAR:

Spironolactone (anti-androgen drug)

Betaine HCL with each meal

Avoiding silicones and occlusives in skin/hair products

 

 

 


#6 1moretime

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:31 PM

Green Gables,

I would love to see those studies. Being on isotretinion for the second time has caused me to read alot of research on it and I haven't seen any clinical study using the gold standard of double blind randomized trials that show that link. I appreciate any help in my understanding of a drug that has worked wonders for me but has at the same time caused me and others to worry about its safety.

Edited by 1moretime, 28 October 2013 - 06:32 PM.


#7 Dubya_B

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:11 PM

Hi Robert. I hope you are feeling much better than you were this Spring.

 

 

1moretime, here is one of the studies that cites a significant decrease in testosterone after a course of isotretinoin:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21103844

 

 

 

Isotretinoin influences pituitary hormone levels in acne patients.

 

Besides suppressing sebum production, the exact mechanism of action of isotretinoin in acne vulgaris is not known. Several hormones have been linked to the pathogenesis of acne. In this study, we investigated the effects of isotretinoin on the pituitary-adrenal axis, whose activity may be increased in acne. Various hormone systems were evaluated before and after 3 months of isotretinoin treatment in 47 acne patients. Free triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody levels decreased significantly during isotretinoin treatment (p < 0.001, p < 0.02 and p < 0.02, respectively), as did those of luteinising hormone, prolactin and total testosterone (p < 0.005), as well as morning cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). We conclude that isotretinoin causes mild suppression of pituitary hormone levels, which may be beneficial for tackling the pathogenesis of acne.

 

There are also studies that show Accutane "decreases testosterone receptor levels by 2.6 fold", and "reduces DHT levels in sebaceaous glands by 80%".

 

Effect of oral isotretinoin treatment on skin androgen receptor levels in male acneic patients.http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/80/4/1158.short

Evidence for decreased androgen 5 alpha-reduction in skin and liver of men with severe acne after 13-cis-retinoic acid treatment. http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/78/5/1064.abstract

It would be nice to have access to all of the data sets in these studies to see whats really going on.

 

Considering the many anti-androgenic effects, one would think isotretinoin would actually be beneficial for androgenic alopecia, although the drug inhibits a different "flavor" of the 5-ar enzyme than the substances normally used for balding.

 

 

 

Do your part to raise awareness:

Report side effects:

Rxisk
https://www.rxisk.or...ects/About.aspx
FDA
https://www.accessda...umer.reporting1
NHS
http://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/
Roche
http://www.roche.co....k/xxxcontactxxx
 

 

If you believe you suffer from the condition known as PFS as a result of Accutane, please donate to the PFS Foundation:

http://www.pfsfoundation.org/

 

 


#8 mes6890

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:34 PM

I would love to see a ton more studies that simply do not exist. I took Accutane for five days - the last pill was on July 18. My skin has been getting thinner ever since. My eyelids keep getting thinner. I can't give you a study, you can just trust me when I say I wake up sometimes in the middle of the night and my eyes feel raw for the simple reason that I am losing skin there. 

 

But I did want to add that I've experienced some hair loss as well. It started almost immediately, shockingly fast, and then let up some. Recently it has been picking up again.


Life with Accutane side effects: http://bloggingmybet....wordpress.com/


#9 mes6890

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    I also post things on occasion to warn folks of the potential dangers of taking saw palmetto and other DHT inhibitors, based on personal experience and the mounting testimonials of others.
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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:02 PM

Accutane can cause massive shedding.

If you experience that, and you are a guy, here's how you can slow down the shedding :

- take Saw Palmetto (it slowed down my hair loss from 200+ hair/day to 20-30/day

- take vitamin D3 (im taking about 5000i.u./EOD.....it dries my hair alot, and lowers the itchy scalp, and lowers the hair loss up to a point, but doesnt stop it)

 

Here's a connection i tried to make about Accutane hair loss and hormones :

 

I, for example, also got E.D. from Accutane. My sperm nowadays is watery. Highly likely to be infertile, like many others who used Accutane.

From my blood work i can see that accutane has lowered the Testosterone level (T) (by 40% in my case) and rise the estradiol (E2) (up to highest level)

From my research, i realised that androgens (T & DHT) cause acne. Estrogen supplimentation is known to clear acne. So, maybe the rise in E2 and drop in T = no or less acne.

People who have high T, have very oily skin , therefore severe acne ! And people with high T have thick hair and acne (it also depends on each male sensitivity to androgens).

By dropping the T, we never regain the same oil production as before, so, for some of us, that causes hair loss, because hair doesnt receive enough "food".

Accutane is an anti-androgen, it lowers T, therefore the oil production lowers, and in some cases, that causes hair fragility, thinning, and loss.

Low T is also associated with hair thinning and hair loss. (its said on many medical articles)

I see that i've got, as many of you, the symptoms of hypogonadism : hair loss, dry skin, bone problems, depression, erectile disfunction (E.D.), etc.

 

Im sorry for my english, i hope you can understand my point of view, which is "low testosterone, high estradiol, low DHT = erectile disfunction + hair loss"

 

Think well. The first shedding period during which u loose tons of hair may be due to accutane poisones. But, if after 6 months or even 1 year you are still shedding, something is really wrong with you and Accutane really messed up something inside you.

This is just my theory, and it makes sense somehow, if you do your research.

 

I'm going to do some unortodox approaches of trying to stop the hair loss. I will start TRT (testosterone replacement therapy) and see if that can stop the hair loss and back up my theory.

 

Do you suffer from Accutane hair loss??

Does your scalp itches and burns?

Does your hair got thinner?

Do you loose hair from other parts of your body also?

 

I don't have much time to use this forum, so, if you wanna know more about my theory, if you wanna tell me your story and talk to me about accutane hair loss, PM me and send me your email address.

Or send me a mail to this address : robydanymay@gmail.com

 

I will also try my best to read your posts on this topic and keep you updated, but maybe not as often, as i'm kinda busy lately.

 

I will try to help each one of you as much as i can, and keep you updated regarding my hair loss treatments, suppliments that i try and tried, blood works which we can compare, and each one's hair loss progress. And more over, i wil tell you if TRT has stopped my hair loss of not.

Together we will find a cure for this. Let's get united.

 

Don't get me wrong. Im not a doctor (but even so, doctors know shit about this problem).

I dont sell anything to anyone of you.

Im an accutane sufferer and i wanna establish a friendship with other people who are in the same situation as me, and try to help each other, support each other.

I believe together we can fight this.

 

Goodluck to everybody and God bless you all!

Careful with saw palmetto (avoid) if you're already having problems from Accutane. Saw palmetto is a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor.


Life with Accutane side effects: http://bloggingmybet....wordpress.com/


#10 Robert1000

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:42 PM

Dubya_B : sadly, im even in a worse situation than this spring:((



Read this study guys:
 
 
Isotretinoin Influences Pituitary Hormone Levels in Acne Patients
Ayse Serap Karadag, Derun Taner Ertugrul, Emre Tutal and Kadir Okhan Akin


Department of Dermatology, Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Departments of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, and Biochemistry, Ankara Kecioren Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

Besides suppressing sebum production, the exact mechanism of action of isotretinoin in acne vulgaris is not known. Several hormones have been linked to the pathogenesis of acne. In this study, we investigated the effects of isotretinoin on the pituitary-adrenal axis, whose activity may be increased in acne. Various hormone systems were evaluated before and after 3 months of isotretinoin treatment in 47 acne patients. Free triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody levels decreased significantly during isotretinoin treatment (p < 0.001, p < 0.02 and p < 0.02, respectively), as did those of luteinising hormone, prolactin and total testosterone (p < 0.005), as well as morning cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). We conclude that isotretinoin causes mild suppression of pituitary hormone levels, which may be beneficial for tackling the pathogenesis of acne. Key words: acne; hormone; isotretinoin; pituitary.

Acne vulgaris is primarily a disease of the pilosebaceous unit. Four main pathogenic factors are known to lead to its development: (i) follicular epidermal hyperproliferation; (ii) excess sebum production; (iii) inflammation; and (iv) the presence and activity of Propionibacterium acnes. With the onset of puberty, androgen-mediated stimulation of the sebaceous gland results in increased sebum production (1). Several hormones implicated in the regulation of sebaceous gland activity have been linked to acne. They include androgens, estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), melanocortins and glucocorticoids (2). Individuals who are intrinsically insensitive to androgens do not produce sebum and do not develop acne. Conversely, conditions characterised by high androgen activity are often associated with acne formation. Thus, it is commonly believed that hypersensitivity of the sebaceous glands to androgens is the underlying cause of acne (3).

Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is produced by the anterior pituitary gland in response to CRH released from the hypothalamus. A precursor polypeptide, its cleavage yields melanocortins, ACTH and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Human sebocytes express the melanocortin receptors MC-1R and MC-5R through which ACTH and MSH produce various effects on the sebaceous gland (2–4). ACTH also stimulates the production of cortisol in the adrenal gland (5). It is well known that the use of topical or systemic glucocorticoids promotes acneiform eruptions. In vitro studies have demonstrated that hydrocortisone stimulates sebocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and that cortisol is essential for sebocyte differentiation, as well as GH- and IGF-1-induced sebocyte differentiation and IGF-1-mediated proliferation (6). These results suggest that steroids may induce acne by promoting sebocyte proliferation and differentiation (7).

Isotretinoin (ISO), a 13-cis-retinoic acid derivative of vitamin A, is a highly effective therapy for severe nodulocystic acne. Although its mechanism of action is not fully understood, ISO is thought to isomerise to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) ISO, which then interacts with retinoid receptors (8).

The mechanism by which decreases sebum production is not well understood. Few published data describe its effects on hormone physiology in acne patients. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of ISO on various hormone systems in acne patients.

MATERIAL AND METHODS
A total of 47 patients with acne vulgaris (31/16 females/males; mean age 20.8 ± 3.5 years), who were admitted to our outpatient dermatology clinic between October 2009 and March 2010, were included in the study. The study group was selected from a group of male and non-pregnant female patients between the ages of 17 and 34 years with moderate to severe nodulocystic acne. Females at risk of becoming pregnant were advised to use barrier contraception methods (no hormonal contraception was allowed), and produced a negative serum pregnancy test one week before the initiation of ISO therapy. Treatment was commenced on the second or third day of the menstrual cycle in these patients. Patients using vitamin A supplements or satisfying any of the following criteria were excluded from the study: sensitivity or allergy to parabens; previously diagnosed thyroid or pituitary disease; recent history of psychiatric, mood or depressive disorders; and previous therapy with oral retinoids or hormone therapy for any reason in last 3 months. All patients gave their written informed consent, and the study was conducted according to GCP guidelines.

The study was approved by the local ethics committee and was conducted according to the ethical principles of the Declaration of Helsinki.

ISO therapy was initiated at a dose of 0.5–0.75 mg/kg body weight. The drug was administered twice daily with meals. Treatment was continued for at least 5 months. Biochemical parameters were screened immediately prior to initiation (pretreatment) and after 3 months of ISO treatment (posttreatment). These parameters were: free T3 (fT3), free T4 (fT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg), thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TRAb), 17-hydroxyprogesterone, progesterone, total and free testosterone, estradiol, luteinising hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), haemoglobin, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C). Fasting blood samples were obtained by venipuncture of the large antecubital veins, without stasis and after 12 hours’ fasting. Samples were centrifuged immediately; the plasma was separated and stored at –80°C. In order to limit undesired variation, all samples were studied on the same day and using the same kit. Fasting serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, HDL-C, ALT and AST concentrations were measured enzymatically using an automatic analyser (Konelab 60i; Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. MA, USA). Total cholesterol and triglycerides were measured using colorimetric enzymatic tests, and LDL-C and HDL-C using an homogeneous enzymatic colorimetric test (Konelab 60i). Serum glucose levels were measured by the hexokinase method (Konelab 60i). fT3 (normal 2.2–4.2 pg/ml), fT4 (normal 0.65–1.7 ng/dl), TSH (normal 0.3–3.6 mIU/l), thyroglobulin (normal 0.2–70 ng/ml), anti-TPO (normal 1–500 IU/ml) and anti-Tg (normal 5–100 IU/ml), ACTH (normal 4.5–48.8 pg/ml) and DHEAS (normal 80.2–339.5 µg/dl) were measured using chemiluminescence methods (Liason®; Diasorin S.p.A., Saluggia, Vercelli, Italy). TRAb (normal 0–405 U/l) (Zentech S.A., Angleur, Belgium) (catalog no: R-CT-100), 17-hydoxyprogesterone (normal 0.61–3.34 ng/ml) and free testosterone (normal 0.02–3.09 pg/ml) (Diagnostic System Laboratory Inc., Texas, USA) were measured by radioimmunoassay.

Levels of estradiol (reference range 27–433 pg/ml), FSH (reference range 1.79–22.51 mIU/ml), LH (normal 0.2–250 mIU/ml), prolactin (normal 1.2–58.64 ng/ml), progesterone (normal 0.08–18.56 ng/ml), total testosterone (normal 0.1–0.75 ng/ml) and cortisol (normal 6.7–22.6 µg/dl) were measured using chemiluminescence methods (UniCel® DxI 800 Immunoassay System; Beckman Coulter Inc., Clinical Diagnostics Division, Brea, CA, USA), as were SHBG levels (normal 16–110 µmol/l) (Architect i2000sr; Abbott Laboratories, Medical Diagnostics Products, New Jersey, USA).

Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 15.0; SSPS Inc., Chicago, Il, USA). The normality of data was analysed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. All numerical variables following a normal distribution were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD), while data that were not normally distributed were expressed as the median (interquartile range (IR)). The paired sample t-test was used to compare pretreatment and posttreatment values for hormonal and biochemical data with homogenic variability. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyse data with skew distribution.

RESULTS
Comparisons of blood lipid and hepatic parameters before and after ISO treatment are summarised in Table I. We found that levels of total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides (p < 0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.005, respectively), AST (p < 0.005) and ALT (p < 0.001) increased following treatment, while HDL-C levels (p < 0.0001) decreased, in accordance with previous findings (9, 10). There was no significant change in fasting blood glucose levels (p > 0.05). Comparisons of pre- and posttreatment hormonal parameters are summarised in Tables II and III. We found that levels of fT3, TSH and TRAb decreased significantly following ISO treatment (p < 0.001, 0.02 and 0.02, respectively). There were no significant changes in the levels of thyroglobulin, anti-Tg or anti-TPO after ISO treatment (Table II). With regard to estradiol, prolactin, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, FSH and LH, we found that posttreatment LH and prolactin levels were significantly lower than pretreatment values (Table III), while there were no significant changes in the other hormonal parameters. Moreover, while there were no changes in free testosterone, DHEAS or SHBG levels, post treatment total testosterone levels were also significantly lower than initial values (p < 0.005). Morning cortisol and ACTH levels were also significantly reduced following ISO treatment (p < 0.005 and 0.05, respectively).


Table I. Pre- and posttreatment values for biochemical parameters (n = 47)
Pretreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
Posttreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
p-value
Fasting blood glucose (mg/dl)
84.2 ± 8.4
87.0 ± 7.0
> 0.05
Total-C (mg/dl)
149.4 ± 37.5
162.4 ± 40.7
< 0.0001
LDL-C (mg/dl)
73.5 ± 23.0
93.0 ± 32.6
< 0.0001
HDL-C (mg/dl)
50.2 ± 14.2
46.7 ± 13.4
< 0.05
Triglyceride (mg/dl)
78.4 ± 31.7
191.9 ± 66.7
< 0.005
AST (mg/dl)
18.2 ± 4.9
24.6 ± 6.4
< 0.0001
ALT (mg/dl)
14.0 (10.0)
18.0 (14.0)
< 0.001
SD: standard deviation; Total-C: total cholesterol; LDL-C: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HDL-C: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; AST: aspartate aminotransferase; ALT: alanine aminotransferase.

Table II. Thyroid function tests and related antibodies (n = 47)
Pretreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
Posttreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
p-value
fT3 (pg/ml)
3.3 ± 0.5
2.9 ± 0.4
< 0.001
fT4 (ng/dl)
1.0 ± 0.2
1.0 ± 0.2
0.086
TSH (mIU/l)
2.0 ± 0.8
1.7 ± 0.9
< 0.02
TRAb (U/l)
8.5 ± 1.3
8.1 ± 1.3
< 0.02
Thyroglobulin (ng/ml)
7.2 ± 4.6
7.5 ± 5.5
0.526
Anti-Tg (IU/ml)
5.4 (2.3)
5.0 (1.02)
0.108
Anti-TPO (IU/ml)
2.5 (3.3)
2.5 (2.4)
0.292
SD: standard deviation; fT3: free T3; fT4: free T4; TSH: thyroid-stimulating hormone; TRAb: thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody; Anti-Tg: anti-thyroglobulin; Anti-TPO: anti-thyroid peroxidase.

Table III. Pre- and posttreatment evaluation of pituitary-adrenal axis and sex hormones (n = 47)
Pretreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
Posttreatment
Mean ± SD or
Median (IR)
p-value
Estradiol (pg/ml)
84.0 (75.0)
67.0 (95.5)
0.615
FSH (mIU/ml)
6.0 ± 3.6
5.9 ± 2.5
0.874
LH (mIU/ml)
8.1 (11.6)
6.7 (6.0)
< 0.02
Prolactin (ng/ml)
13.3 ± 5.7
11.6 ± 4.4
< 0.02
Progesterone (ng/ml)
1.9 (3.8)
1.5 (2.6)
0.791
17-hydroxyprogesterone (ng/ml)
2.3 (2.1)
2.3 (2.2)
0.191
Total testosterone (ng/ml)
0.7 (0.4)
0.5 (0.4)
< 0.005
DHEAS (µg/dl)
217.6 ± 104.9
205.6 ± 80.0
0.354
Free testosterone (pg/ml)
2.9 (2.0)
2.5 (1.1)
0.338
SHBG (µmol/l)
40.6 ± 19.8
51.7 ± 34.1
0.055
Cortisol (μg/dl)
13.1 ± 5.2
11.0 ± 5.8
< 0.005
ACTH (pg/ml)
28.9 ± 17.0
24.9 ± 13.6
< 0.05
SD: standard deviation; FSH: follicle-stimulating hormone; LH: luteinising hormone; DHEAS: dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate; SHBG: sex hormone-binding globulin; ACTH: adrenocorticotropic hormone.

When we analyzed men and women seperately, posttreatment total testosterone levels were still significant (p = 0.003), however cortisol and LH levels lost their significance in women. In men, however, posttreatment levels of cortisol (p = 0.044), but not total testosterone (p = 0.063) or LH (p = 0.07), were lower than pretreatment values. These disparities may be related to the decrease in statistical power caused by dividing the study group into two subgroups.

Discussion
In this study, we found that ISO treatment induced several changes in the hormonal status of acne patients: TSH, fT3, cortisol, ACTH, LH, total testosterone and prolactin levels declined significantly after 3 months of treatment (see Table III).

Very few clinical studies have investigated the effects of retinoids on pituitary hormone levels. Angioni et al. (11) studied the effects of the aromatic retinoid acitretin on pituitary hormone levels in eleven adult male psoriasis patients. They found significant decreases in TSH, fT3 and prolactin levels after treatment, consistent with our results. They did not, however, detect changes in cortisol, testosterone, LH or FSH levels, which may reflect the use of another retinoid and the smaller patient group in this study compared to our study.

To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the effects of ISO on thyroid hormone levels. Decreases in TSH and fT3 levels may be caused by central hypothyroidism due to RXR-mediated suppression of TSHβ gene expression, as previously shown for bexarotene (12). However, it is unclear whether treatment of acne with ISO generates enough 9-cis-isomers to account for any RXR-mediated effect. Although the decrease in TRAb levels after ISO treatment was statistically significant, the size of the change (average 4%) may not be clinically important in individuals without thyroid disease.

It has been demonstrated that retinoids are able to induce the transcription of the dopamine receptor type 2 (D2R) gene in cultured pituitary cells, this effect being due to the presence of a functional retinoic acid response element (RARE) in the D2R promoter (13). The decrease in the levels of prolactin following ISO treatment may be related to an increase in central dopaminergic tonus. In a previous study, we showed that IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels also decrease following ISO treatment (14), responses that may also have stemmed from an increase in dopaminergic tonus.

Retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation and apoptosis in different cell types (15). Some of these effects result from reduced binding of the transcription factors AP-1 and Nur77 to their cognate DNA sites (16, 17). These factors are also essential in the control of the POMC gene, which is the precursor for both ACTH and α-MSH (18–20). Páez-Pereda et al. (21) have shown that ATRA inhibits ACTH secretion both in vitro and in vivo through an effect on POMC transcription, and also inhibits ACTH-secreting tumour cell development and proliferation. They found that retinoic acid inhibits the transcriptional activity of AP-1 and the orphan receptors Nur77 and Nurr1 in ACTH-secreting tumour cells. They also showed that, in adrenal cortex cells, retinoic acid inhibits corticosterone production and cell proliferation. Castillo et al. (22), meanwhile, demonstrated the effectiveness of 9-cis retinoic acid for treating Cushing’s disease in dogs. We speculate that these molecular mechanisms may contribute to the observed decreases in the levels of both ACTH and cortisol following ISO treatment.

We do not know the reasons behind the declines in LH and total testosterone levels in our study. Few studies have investigated the effects of retinoids on androgen metabolism. One previous study reported decreases in the levels of testosterone and the precursor androgen androstenedione in 6/9 acne patients after 12 weeks of ISO therapy (23). However, these researchers did not observe a significant change in LH levels. In a laboratory study, ATRA was found to decrease both basal and LH-stimulated testosterone secretion in cultured testicular cells, these effect being mediated by RARα receptors (24).The decrease in testosterone levels may at least partly explain the effectiveness of this medication for treating acne. Androgens are important in the pathogenesis of acne because they enhance follicular keratosis and influence sebum production (25). Several studies have demonstrated hyperandrogenaemia in patients with acne vulgaris, typically in conjunction with other clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism, alopecia and/or menstrual disturbances. Estrogen treatments effectively combat acne by lowering levels of androgens, (25) and counteracting their effects on the sebaceous gland. Reducing testosterone levels may also be beneficial in polycystic ovary syndrome, in which hyperandrogenaemia is a well-known pathogenic mechanism.

In conclusion, we have shown in this study that short-term ISO treatment results in mild suppression of pituitary hormones.
This effect may be related to the effectiveness of this medication in acne treatment. We propose that retinoids may be tested in the future in the treatment of different pituitary diseases.
----------------------------------------
 
So, it's clear Accutane supresses some hormones, including testosterone.
I did alot of research on this, i also found some men in the bodybuilding forums, which reported a decrease in testosterone after the accutane treatment.
 
This about it.....in men, it's said that androgens control the sebum production. In their puberty, the males have the highest levels on androgens... and many of them have very oily skin and acne.
Lower testosterone = lower sebum production = no acne
This is my theory, which sounds logical, from my point of view.
As men get older their androgen levels decreases and their hair is thinning. Right?
 
This may not be the answer, but there's a study, as u can see, which stands for my theory. Accutane decreases some hormones!!!
 
What's your opinion guys?

Edited by Robert1000, 29 October 2013 - 12:52 PM.


#11 1moretime

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 04:55 PM

I work in healthcare research and one of the cautions we always preach is inferring fact using research based on small sample size. There indeed maybe issues with how isotretinoin effects hormones but much more research needs to be done before jumping to conclusions. Robert, the research you cite is very interesting and potentially alarming but you should note a small section of their paper which reinforces my caution with regards to small numbers:

"When we analyzed men and women seperately, posttreatment total testosterone levels were still significant (p = 0.003), however cortisol and LH levels lost their significance in women. In men, however, posttreatment levels of cortisol (p = 0.044), but not total testosterone (p = 0.063) or LH (p = 0.07), were lower than pretreatment values. These disparities may be related to the decrease in statistical power caused by dividing the study group into two subgroups"

Note that for men, there was no statistically significant drop in total testosterone.

I'm dumb and naive about my health as most but one thing I tend to be cautious about is research and the conclusions they tout. I still don't know if coffee is good for you or bad!

#12 oli girl

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:53 PM

You can't compare Coffee to Accutane! Accutane is toxic even the original inventor stated that! Accutane aka Chemo can't  be good for you and I won't even get into how many women who have unexplained infertility reports. Not to mention sexual dysfunction has been reported to the FDA since the 80's and hormonal issues. Why would  Roche spend any extra money on their miracle $$$$ drug, not to mention they pulled from the U.S. and generics don't have too.

 

However, there is promise in Dr. Crisler  for Accutane and propecia victims and research!

 

I am perplexed on why you are arguing with suffers as you will never truly understand unless it happens to you. If you have nothing to offer Robert then why waste your timeeusa_doh.gif

 

Robert I am sorry to hear that things aren't getting better for you and Dubya thanks for posting all that for him, hope your doing well!


The secret of health for both mind & body
is not to mourn for the past, not to worry about the future, or not anticipate troubles, but to live the present moment wisely and earnestly.
The Buddha

#13 1moretime

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 07:05 PM

You can't compare Coffee to Accutane! Accutane is toxic even the original inventor stated that! Accutane aka Chemo can't  be good for you and I won't even get into how many women who have unexplained infertility reports. Not to mention sexual dysfunction has been reported to the FDA since the 80's and hormonal issues. Why would  Roche spend any extra money on their miracle $$$$ drug, not to mention they pulled from the U.S. and generics don't have too.

 

However, there is promise in Dr. Crisler  for Accutane and propecia victims and research!

 

I am perplexed on why you are arguing with suffers as you will never truly understand unless it happens to you. If you have nothing to offer Robert then why waste your timeeusa_doh.gif

 

Robert I am sorry to hear that things aren't getting better for you and Dubya thanks for posting all that for him, hope your doing well!

 

I must have mistaken this forum for a place for constructive dialogue.  You must believe that only occurs through feeling sorry for someone and agreeing to everything they say. Good luck Robert, I hope you find some peace and health.



#14 Robert1000

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 02:15 PM

There are some things i would never understand about Accutane...like : Why 99,99% girls who take accutane are recovering? why do their hair stop shedding, and this doesnt happen for guys too???

 

I see that the "old generation" of accutane hair loss sufferers, from last year, stopped posting here. Why's that?

If they have found something that helps, why don't they reveal that to others by posting an update?

 

Some don't even reply to emails from others... even though there was a time when they were desperate and looking for some help... sad.png

 

Today i had my first injection of testosterone, and nothing happened at all, no change sad.png

An accutane sufferer, named "electroshock", wrote that his hair loss slowed down considerably after his first T shot....but in my case, there's nothing to report:(

I will continue it for a couple of weeks, and if nothing happens, i will quit. However, im really disappointed today.....feeling hopeless.

My scalp really hurts when i touch it....maybe it's athropied? it seems that way........damn it

I also feel some discomfort at the right kidney... where i have a cyst:(

 

I drank some clay, which it says will detox ur colon, and it freakin' dried my scalp and hair even more....

 

The high dose of Vit. d3, which seemed to slow down the shedding started to be useless for me... guess the body got used to it and don't respond anymore...

 

Anyone knows anything that would help with this hair loss? im afraid to try rogaine again, cause it doesnt seem to work in this problem......

Help!!!!


Edited by Robert1000, 30 October 2013 - 02:17 PM.


#15 Robert1000

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:15 PM

Update 1 : I started TRT on 200mg/day of T, injectables. I continued it for 2 weeks. 

The result : oilier forehead, but really thin oil type, which doesn't seem to help with the hair loss. I need that thick oil production back.

It doesn't help with the E.D. either, not even 1%.

So TRT result is : failure.

 

In a few days i will get my liver tests results, and post here. Wish more accutane sufferers will post here some blood results, not just symptoms.

 

I'm willing to do many types of experiments, to get this poison out of my body, so do follow up my progress, if you are interested. Bye  for now. God bless u all!


Edited by Robert1000, 13 November 2013 - 03:17 PM.


#16 monn

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 07:11 PM

How on Earth do you expect the TRT to do its thing when you are taking all that saw palmetto? I imagine that you are currently able to work; do you think you will be able to work long into the future?



#17 Robert1000

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:29 AM

How on Earth do you expect the TRT to do its thing when you are taking all that saw palmetto? I imagine that you are currently able to work; do you think you will be able to work long into the future?

 

 I only tried saw palmetto a bit many months ago......the point is that TRT is not the answer because the sebum supression caused by accutane is not directly related to any supression of the androgens. Something more complex is going on.

 

What do u mean by that? I don't know, but this depression and the brain fog that i got from that poison drug influences my work more and more...



#18 monn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 08:49 AM

 I only tried saw palmetto a bit many months ago......the point is that TRT is not the answer because the sebum supression caused by accutane is not directly related to any supression of the androgens. Something more complex is going on.

I hate to break it to you, but you are still taking a poison in saw palmetto and vitamin D. I’m not sure you appreciate the point of it all. You are not going to feel any benefit from TRT with any antiandrogen in your system; and, it’s common knowledge that TRT doesn’t offer long term respite for the people in our community (initially perhaps). And, yes, the sebum suppression caused by Accutane is related to androgen inhibition and receptor blockage.

 

You are trying to say that optimizing hormones levels after the fact cannot undo the long-term damage from the initial bout of androgen suppression and receptor diminution, blockade and transcriptional fiddling; but, in every sense, suppression of androgens initiated the damage. Now, hormone flooding will not undo the damage, but that is not what you said. You said what you did, in order to justify androgen suppression after the fact, but that is malarkey.



#19 Robert1000

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 09:29 AM

The damages done by Accutane are more complex that just lowering the androgens......after the TRT, i can finally see it clearly.

I did 200mg/week of pure injectable T, which should at least double my T, which wasnt low in the first place, just in the mid levels... i could feel the T increasing, but, it only brought some super thin sebum on my forehead, but nothing compared to before accutane....and my hair was still thin as hell...

Propecia lowers DHT, right? so we could easily say that if the propecia/finasteride victims receive DHT injections/creams/etc will get back to normal, but u see, it doesnt happen like that......things arent as simple as u think...

I even took a DHT supplement, but again, it made no different, not even to the E.D. ... so things are just much more complicated...

IT seems as the accutane users experience the simptoms of hypervitaminosis A but also the symptoms of a vitamin A deficiency....Vitamin A is the key to sebum production....u see, people deficient to vitamin A have dry skin, thin hair, and taking vitamin A makes their skin oily and hair thick...

I just told u i didnt take saw palmetto since many months ago........during TRT i didnt even take vitamin D......

U say the androgen suppresion caused all these sides......but then again, why women get the same sides? their androgen levels are really too low.......

If we knew the mecanism of action of the accutane drug, maybe we could reverse the damages, but the truth is that, we can only guess.....we dont know anything for sure....

As someone also said, we can only try to eat healthy, exercise, do colon/liver cleanse, and pray. Not even doctors dont really know what does this drug do to our bodies....sadly...i really dont understand why a drug like this is sold like candies, when nobody actually know how it works...


Edited by Robert1000, 15 November 2013 - 09:35 AM.


#20 monn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 10:20 AM

You need to read what I said slowly.






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