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Using Light Therapy With Topical Treatments?

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#1 AzhureSnow

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 07:29 PM

So, I am not sure if this should be posted in the prescription section or the OTC section, and forgive me if this is incorrect. 

 

I'm considering purchasing an OTC blue-light therapy device to help with my acne. I have heard some people say it doesn't help at all with cystic acne, and others say it's a miracle product. I was wondering if anyone had used a device or spa therapy like this while also using medications for acne. 

 

Currently I'm using: 

Philosophy Purity Made Simple cleanser

AM treatment: Benzaclin (RX)

PM treatment: 0.05% Retin-A

Moisturizer: a custom blend of rose hip oil, lavender essential oil, and rosemary essential oil.

Oral: taking minocycline 2x a day (just started a week ago).

 

Do you think it is worth the exorbitant price tag to try the light therapy devices? Do they work well for hormonal cystic acne, or are they better for "regular" acne breakouts? 



#2 RemyM

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 07:52 AM

Hi Azhure, interested to know your progress with your combined therapy. Blue light or even other laser/ipl therapies have worked quite well... just not sure if an OTC device is powerful enough to reach the depths of skin to address cystic acne. Also, I understand the need for a moisturizer, but aren't oils bad, as they generally clogs pores and trap bacteria?

 

Also, has the minicycline worked on it's own (without any side effects)? 

 

Wondering if seeking medical advice on how to first balance your hormone levels.

 

Also, what are you using to manage the bacterial influence on your skin? Seems to be the one area most regimens overlook.



#3 Green Gables

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 12:03 PM

I used one of the best light therapy devices on the market (the Lightwave CS). It is good for surface acne, the kind with lots of pus. It does not help cystic acne--no light therapy really does. 



#4 stephzoars

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 12:24 PM

So, I am not sure if this should be posted in the prescription section or the OTC section, and forgive me if this is incorrect. 

 

I'm considering purchasing an OTC blue-light therapy device to help with my acne. I have heard some people say it doesn't help at all with cystic acne, and others say it's a miracle product. I was wondering if anyone had used a device or spa therapy like this while also using medications for acne. 

 

Currently I'm using: 

Philosophy Purity Made Simple cleanser

AM treatment: Benzaclin (RX)

PM treatment: 0.05% Retin-A

Moisturizer: a custom blend of rose hip oil, lavender essential oil, and rosemary essential oil.

Oral: taking minocycline 2x a day (just started a week ago).

 

Do you think it is worth the exorbitant price tag to try the light therapy devices? Do they work well for hormonal cystic acne, or are they better for "regular" acne breakouts? 

 

I've heard rose hip oil can cause breakouts in some, have you noticed any difference after using those blends of oils?

 

I've been looking into light therapy and some of them are so freakin expensive! I would say try a cheaper one off of Amazon that has high reviews and look into something of better quality after testing the waters. It's always worth a shot, right?



#5 AzhureSnow

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:29 PM

Hi Azhure, interested to know your progress with your combined therapy. Blue light or even other laser/ipl therapies have worked quite well... just not sure if an OTC device is powerful enough to reach the depths of skin to address cystic acne. Also, I understand the need for a moisturizer, but aren't oils bad, as they generally clogs pores and trap bacteria?

 

Also, has the minicycline worked on it's own (without any side effects)? 

 

Wondering if seeking medical advice on how to first balance your hormone levels.

 

Also, what are you using to manage the bacterial influence on your skin? Seems to be the one area most regimens overlook.

 

So, I've been using the Benzaclin/Retin-A combo since June 1, and added the Minocycline on Aug 22. Here's what I've seen:

I had a HORRIBLE initial breakout on the Retin-A 0.025%. It lasted for months, and it was deep, painful cystic breakouts that never seemed to stop. My acne is entirely concentrated on my cheeks and jawline. That area is now miserably scarred with redness from the IB... so much worse than before treatment, but I'm told Retin-A will help the scar tissue over a year or so. The Benzaclin was also really harsh. Between the two my skin peeled and flaked so horribly the first 6-8 weeks. Now, it's "toughened up" and the doubled dose of Retin-A didn't irritate, and Benzaclin no longer stings. The initial period was so rough that even a makeup brush on my skin hurt (at the time I worked for a cosmetics company so makeup was mandatory). 

The minocycline has definitely helped in the last 2 weeks, I *think*. The breakouts I had on my jawline that were red and swollen and painful shrunk down to much smaller, isolated breakouts in less than 2 days on mino. I attribute this to the antibacterial properties of the medicine. Today, after around 2 weeks or so on minocycline, my breakouts feel like the ones I used to get when I was a teenager - small bumps in isolated areas. I've still got a dozen or so along my jawline, but they are not painful to the touch nor do they appear infected. 

To manage surface bacteria, I use the benzaclin. Benzaclin is a combination of benzoyle peroxide (a common ingredient in OTC acne medication) and clindamycin, a topical antibiotic. 

The thing about oils is a common misconception. Oil begets oil, so using a bio-oil to moisturize can actually regulate oil production on your skin, therefore causing LESS acne. Plus, it's completely natural, which means less risk of allergic reactions for very sensitive skin. Rose hip oil is incredibly high in vitamin A as well and improves cell turnover and does wonders for all types of scarring. The lavender oil is antiseptic and anti-inflammatory - both good for acne as well. 

Now, I'm not saying go slather butter on your face, but there is a host of evidence to show that many bio-oils (read: not created in a lab somewhere) are great for skin. Argan oil, rose hip oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, almond oil... all make excellent moisturizers. Everyone's skin is different and some people report different outcome. It's a matter of finding the best oil for your skin personally. Olive and coconut oil did not agree with me, but rose hip has been incredibly soothing so far. 

 

As for managing hormones - I've got a sensitivity to most estrogen-based birth control pills (basically, the only thing besides spironolactone that could balance hormones) so I'm trying to avoid them if at all possible. I did get a 3 month supply of Loestra (a low-dose BC pill) from my GP when she prescribed the minocycline. You can't start it until day 1 of a cycle, so I have to wait to start it, but I thought about giving minocycline about 6 weeks to work before starting birth control - the nausea, headaches, and weight gain are horrible.



I used one of the best light therapy devices on the market (the Lightwave CS). It is good for surface acne, the kind with lots of pus. It does not help cystic acne--no light therapy really does. 

Thanks. That's kind of what I was worried about - that cycstic/deep rooted acne wouldn't benefit. 



Hi Azhure, interested to know your progress with your combined therapy. Blue light or even other laser/ipl therapies have worked quite well... just not sure if an OTC device is powerful enough to reach the depths of skin to address cystic acne. Also, I understand the need for a moisturizer, but aren't oils bad, as they generally clogs pores and trap bacteria?

 

Also, has the minicycline worked on it's own (without any side effects)? 

 

Wondering if seeking medical advice on how to first balance your hormone levels.

 

Also, what are you using to manage the bacterial influence on your skin? Seems to be the one area most regimens overlook.

Also - side effects. The first 8 days I was miserable - had constant indigestion, nausea, fatigue, and headache. A few days ago that subsided and I don't seem to be experiencing anything negative anymore. 



So, I am not sure if this should be posted in the prescription section or the OTC section, and forgive me if this is incorrect. 

 

I'm considering purchasing an OTC blue-light therapy device to help with my acne. I have heard some people say it doesn't help at all with cystic acne, and others say it's a miracle product. I was wondering if anyone had used a device or spa therapy like this while also using medications for acne. 

 

Currently I'm using: 

Philosophy Purity Made Simple cleanser

AM treatment: Benzaclin (RX)

PM treatment: 0.05% Retin-A

Moisturizer: a custom blend of rose hip oil, lavender essential oil, and rosemary essential oil.

Oral: taking minocycline 2x a day (just started a week ago).

 

Do you think it is worth the exorbitant price tag to try the light therapy devices? Do they work well for hormonal cystic acne, or are they better for "regular" acne breakouts? 

 

I've heard rose hip oil can cause breakouts in some, have you noticed any difference after using those blends of oils?

 

I've been looking into light therapy and some of them are so freakin expensive! I would say try a cheaper one off of Amazon that has high reviews and look into something of better quality after testing the waters. It's always worth a shot, right?

Oils can make or break your skin. I've tried several oils (commercial moisturizers just weren't doing well for me) and about 5 drops of rose-hip oil after washing and about 30 minutes after my treatment (retin or benza) is so soothing to my skin. It absorbs very quickly and within 5 minutes my skin feels normal - not the itchy-dry that the medications make it, and definitely not greasy. 

 

I've also thought about seeing an aesthetician... maybe they have stronger lights? Once I get most of it cleared up, I'm going to talk to a dermatologist about lactic acid peels for scarring and red light therapy as well.



#6 stephzoars

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 03:12 PM

Oils can make or break your skin. I've tried several oils (commercial moisturizers just weren't doing well for me) and about 5 drops of rose-hip oil after washing and about 30 minutes after my treatment (retin or benza) is so soothing to my skin. It absorbs very quickly and within 5 minutes my skin feels normal - not the itchy-dry that the medications make it, and definitely not greasy. 


 

I've also thought about seeing an aesthetician... maybe they have stronger lights? Once I get most of it cleared up, I'm going to talk to a dermatologist about lactic acid peels for scarring and red light therapy as well.

 

 

 

 

You can use milk for gentle exfoliating with lactic acid, have you ever tried that? I took a milk bath with a tub full of water and a gallon of 2% milk and my skin felt so soothed and soft. I did rinse off afterwards of course, but I would give it a try if you haven't yet. I don't even digest milk, but on the skin it feels fantastic! And okay, just make sure you're not overlooking something because you've been using it so long. I do that with makeup sometimes. >_<



#7 Semmer

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 01:52 PM

I love my Sirius Aurora Light system. I got it for a steal, at like 70 bucks on Amazon... it has a green light for hyperpigmantation, blue for acne and red for toning and wrinkles. I was getting great results, but then found BP worked faster and wasn't a huge time commitment. So then I started adding them together a couple of weeks ago, and my light system broke. I bought it in March, and there's a one yr warranty. So I literally called today, but had to leave a voicemail... odd. ANd I'm not expecting them to call me back, so I'm gonna bug them for a new device.

 

Last week I was getting a cyst, and immediately kept 10% BP on the spot, (jojoba oil to moisturize) and used the blue light two nights in a row just on that spot for 3 minutes. The cyst completely stopped forming and died. Thank God.  

So I say if you have the cash, do it. 



#8 RemyM

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 07:28 AM

Let me know if the OTC blue light device works. I know the higher powered version (i.e. the blu-u) is a medical standard for treating acne... just not sure about the cost; otherwise, maybe a professional treatment is the kick start your skin needs?  Also, thanks everybody for the info on oils :)

 

A couple of other things I've been researching... dermarolling and the effects of stress on acne sufferers.

 

Dermarolling seems to be very effective (and not too costly), but I'm concernred about infection. Anybody try this?

 

Stress... we all have it in our lives, some more than others. From what I've gathered from more severe cases (i.e. friends with acne inversa or hidradenitis suppurativa), stress seems to greatly exacerbate acne for many sufferers (http://www.webmd.com...stress-and-acne). Has anybody else given this thought?



#9 stephzoars

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 12:16 PM

Let me know if the OTC blue light device works. I know the higher powered version (i.e. the blu-u) is a medical standard for treating acne... just not sure about the cost; otherwise, maybe a professional treatment is the kick start your skin needs?  Also, thanks everybody for the info on oils smile.png

 

A couple of other things I've been researching... dermarolling and the effects of stress on acne sufferers.

 

Dermarolling seems to be very effective (and not too costly), but I'm concernred about infection. Anybody try this?

 

Stress... we all have it in our lives, some more than others. From what I've gathered from more severe cases (i.e. friends with acne inversa or hidradenitis suppurativa), stress seems to greatly exacerbate acne for many sufferers (http://www.webmd.com...stress-and-acne). Has anybody else given this thought?

 

You're on to a few great things here. I purchased a dermaroller (1.5mm) a year ago and still have never opened the package because I feel like I'm gonna screw my entire face up! Plus, you're not supposed to use it if you have active acne. :X

 

And stress is a major factor in your health, skin included. Whatever it takes to get you in a good mood.. exercise, eating right, singing, whatever you need to do. Who doesn't want to be happy anyways?

 

 

Has anyone here ever tried drinking Apple Cider Vinegar every morning? I'm about to start and I'm wondering if a tablespoon is enough? Right now I drink lemon water whenever I can but I'm wondering what else people have tried.

 

I've decided not to purchase a light until I've tried everything else. It seems like your skin depends on it to stay clear then. Sort of like topicals.



#10 Kalinka

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 05:31 PM

Let me know if the OTC blue light device works. I know the higher powered version (i.e. the blu-u) is a medical standard for treating acne... just not sure about the cost; otherwise, maybe a professional treatment is the kick start your skin needs?  Also, thanks everybody for the info on oils smile.png

 

A couple of other things I've been researching... dermarolling and the effects of stress on acne sufferers.

 

Dermarolling seems to be very effective (and not too costly), but I'm concernred about infection. Anybody try this?

 

Stress... we all have it in our lives, some more than others. From what I've gathered from more severe cases (i.e. friends with acne inversa or hidradenitis suppurativa), stress seems to greatly exacerbate acne for many sufferers (http://www.webmd.com...stress-and-acne). Has anybody else given this thought?

 

You're on to a few great things here. I purchased a dermaroller (1.5mm) a year ago and still have never opened the package because I feel like I'm gonna screw my entire face up! Plus, you're not supposed to use it if you have active acne. sick.gif

 

And stress is a major factor in your health, skin included. Whatever it takes to get you in a good mood.. exercise, eating right, singing, whatever you need to do. Who doesn't want to be happy anyways?

 

 

Has anyone here ever tried drinking Apple Cider Vinegar every morning? I'm about to start and I'm wondering if a tablespoon is enough? Right now I drink lemon water whenever I can but I'm wondering what else people have tried.

 

I've decided not to purchase a light until I've tried everything else. It seems like your skin depends on it to stay clear then. Sort of like topicals.

I drink ACV in water in the mornings.  I don't really measure it, but I think it's about a tablespoon or a bit more into a glass of about 2 cups of water. I really quite like it for the taste alone, aside from any health benefits. Not sure if it's done anything for my skin or whatever, but I think that drinking it has helped me avoid getting sick with a cold a few times last winter (or at least not as long lasting and bad of a cold).



#11 RemyM

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 03:16 PM

At first, I thought the idea of drinking apple cidar vinegar to be far fetched. However, looking at it from the stand point of insulin insensitivity, there does seem to be a corelation between higher glucose levels and propensity for acne. Even though it may be a controversial topic, there does seem to be some clinical data supporting the theory that vinegar can help stabilize blood sugar (in regards to diabetes). For example, http://open.umich.ed...ter-group04.pdf

 

Thinking about further, I can see how stabilizing sugar levels would have an all encompassing effect, not only on acne, but stress levels & irritability, etc. Maybe this is one of the common linkes between stress & acne?  And for those people who experience a benefit by drinking apple cidar vinegar, it could indicate that these people are pre-diabetic?






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