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Diet And Acne. Compilation Of Studies.


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#1 Absthethics

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 04:42 PM

    I am putting this together to inform the people out there that diet plays a significant role in acne. The skin is an organ which is an external manifestion of what's going on in the inside. Acne is and was virtually non-existant in populations who abstain from the typical 'Western Diet.' Epigentics, is how the environment affects gene expression. In other words, what you eat, think, and do plays an enmourous role on gene expression and therefore health, including acne. In order for this to work, it requires some sacrifice and discipline. If you are weak-willed and lack discipline you will uiltimately fail. I began to do research in the nutrition-acne connection once traditional dermatological methods failed. Pay attention to the way diary particularly has negative effects. My own personal results have shown that eliminating dairy intake, lowering "bad carbs," and eating more veggies and fruits as the primary carb source (paleo) has eliminated my acne. I only posted a fraction of the studies in diet-acne connection, there are many more. The following sample of studies demonstrate why this works; it is primarily due to the role these foods have on hormones and other pathways in the body which lead to inflammation:





1.) Evaluation of serum vitamins A and E and zinc levels according to the severity of acne vulgaris.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/23826827; "....Thus there was a negative correlation between acne severity and vitamin E and zinc levels. Conclusion: Our study marks the importance of diet in patients with acne. We offer supportive dietary measures with foods rich in vitamin A and E and zinc in the acne prophylaxis and treatment. Supportive treatment with these vitamins and zinc in severe acne may lead to satisfactory results."

2.)Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23801097 ;...From the 1960s onwards they have become widely known as one of the most common methods for obesity treatment. Recent work over the last decade or so has provided evidence of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets in many pathological conditions, such as diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, acne, neurological diseases, cancer and the amelioration of respiratory and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The possibility that modifying food intake can be useful for reducing or eliminating pharmaceutical methods of treatment, which are often lifelong with significant side effects, calls for serious investigation. This review revisits the meaning of physiological ketosis in the light of this evidence and considers possible mechanisms for the therapeutic actions of the ketogenic diet on different diseases.

From here on, we begin to see that Dairy is a major component of acne:

3.)Turning acne on/off via mTORC1 ;http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23800069. Over the past 10 years, the increase in comprehension of the mechanisms behind acne has been truly exponential. Starting with the ethnological work of Cordain, accelerated by the epidemiological work of Adebamowo, supported by the clinical trials of Smith and Mann, Kwon, DiLandro and others, the interface of diet and acne is coming into focus. Melnik now presents an exceptional pair of papers that illustrate for dermatologists what translational research is all about. The Western diet, the role of dairy, FoxO1 and mTORC1, the interplay of agonists and antagonists, therapeutics present and future - the jigsaw puzzle is coming together.

4.)Acne and diet; http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/23529682; ..In industrialized countries acne presents as an epidemic disease of civilization affecting sebaceous follicles of adolescents and young adults, associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance. "Western style" diet, characterized by high glycaemic load and increased consumption of insulinotropic milk proteins, plays an important role in acne pathogenesis. On the cellular level, nutrient-derived metabolic signals are sensed by the metabolic transcription factor FoxO1 and integrated by the regulatory kinase mTORC1. mTORC1, the central hub of protein- and lipid biosynthesis, cell growth and proliferation, is activated by insulin, IGF-1 and branched-chain essential amino acids, especially leucine. The understanding of Western diet-mediated nutrient signalling with over-activated mTORC1 offers a reasonable approach for dietary intervention in acne by lowering glycaemic load and consumption of milk and milk products. A suitable diet attenuating increased mTORC1 activity is a Palaeolithic-like diet with reduced intake of sugar, hyperglycaemic grains, milk and milk products but enriched consumption of vegetables and fish.

5.)High glycemic load diet, milk and ice cream consumption are related to acne vulgaris in Malaysian young adults: a case control study. http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/22898209; Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris

6.) Clinical and histological effect of a low glycaemic load diet in treatment of acne vulgaris in Korean patients: a randomized, controlled trial. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22678562
"Subjects within the low glycaemic group demonstrated significant clinical improvement in the number of both non-inflammatory and inflammatory acne lesions. Histopathological examination of skin samples revealed several characteristics, including reduced size of sebaceous glands, decreased inflammation, and reduced expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, and interleukin-8 in the low glycaemic load group. A reduction in glycaemic load of the diet for 10 weeks resulted in improvements in acne."

7.)Diet in acne: further evidence for the role of nutrient signalling in acne pathogenesis; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22419445
"... in this issue of Acta Dermato-Venereologica, have provided evidence for the beneficial therapeutic effects of low glycaemic load diets in acne. Epidemiological evidence confirms that milk consumption has an acne-promoting or acne-aggravating effect. Recent progress in understanding the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) allows a new view of nutrient signalling in acne by both high glycaemic load and increased insulin-, IGF-1-, and leucine signalling due to milk protein consumption

8.) Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome;http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21699736 Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.

9.)Nutrition and acne; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21034984. There are significant data supporting the role of diet in acne. Our Western diet includes many dairy sources containing hormones.. The natural function of milk being to stimulate growth, it contains anabolic steroids as well as true growth hormones and other growth factors. The presence of 5α-pregnanedione, 5α-androstanedione, and other precursors of 5α-dihydrotestosterone add to the potency of milk as a stimulant of acne. In addition, foods with significant sugar content and other carbohydrates yielding high glycemic loads affect serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, both of which promote increased production of available androgens and the subsequent development of acne.

 

10.)Acne: prevalence and relationship with dietary habits in Eskisehir, Turkey; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22070422 Acne prevalence is high among adolescents in Eskisehir but the rate of consulting doctor is low. Increasing public awareness is critical for convincing adolescents to seek medical help earlier. Acne was related with dietary habits. Fat, sugar and fast food consumption is found to be positively correlated with acne prevalence.


11.)Pathways to inflammation: acne pathophysiology; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21609898 A recurring question from patients who seek help from various healthcare professionals - their pharmacist, family doctor or dermatologist, is "why?" They also ask questions about a possible familial link, the impact of their diet and the association with their hormones. The following review aims to link these factors with the end result - inflammation.

12.)Evidence for acne-promoting effects of milk and other insulinotropic dairy products;http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21335995
cne vulgaris, the most common skin disease of western civilization, has evolved to an epidemic affecting more than 85% of adolescents. Acne can be regarded as an indicator disease of exaggerated insulinotropic western nutrition. Especially milk and whey protein-based products contribute to elevations of postprandial insulin and basal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plasma levels. It is the evolutional principle of mammalian milk to promote growth and support anabolic conditions for the neonate during the nursing period. Whey proteins are most potent inducers of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secreted by enteroendocrine K cells which in concert with hydrolyzed whey protein-derived essential amino acids stimulate insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells. Increased insulin/IGF-I signaling activates the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby reducing the nuclear content of the transcription factor FoxO1, the key nutrigenomic regulator of acne target genes. Nuclear FoxO1 deficiency has been linked to all major factors of acne pathogenesis, i.e. androgen receptor transactivation, comedogenesis, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, and follicular inflammation. The elimination of the whey protein-based insulinotropic mechanisms of milk will be the most important future challenge for nutrition research. Both, restriction of milk consumption or generation of less insulinotropic milk will have an enormous impact on the prevention of epidemic western diseases like obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and acne.

13.)Acne: Diet and acnegenesis;http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23130204 Acne is a manifestation of hormonal overstimulation of the pilosebaceous units of genetically susceptible individuals. Endogenous reproductive and growth hormones, exogenous reproductive hormones, insulin and endogenous insulin-like growth hormone-1, sourced from and stimulated by dairy and high glycemic load foods, all appear to contribute to this overstimulation. A postulated molecular mechanism linking food and acne is reported and integrated into the clinical picture.

14.)Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22253996 Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity.Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

15.)Innovative uses for zinc in dermatology; http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20510767....severe zinc deficiency states, such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, are associated with a variety of skin manifestations, such as perioral, acral, and perineal dermatitis. These syndromes can be reversed with systemic zinc repletion. In addition to skin pathologies that are clearly zinc-dependent, many dermatologic conditions (eg, dandruff, acne, and diaper rash) have been associated and treated with zinc.

16.)Does diet really affect acne?;http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20361171 Acne vulgaris has anecdotally been attributed to diet by individuals affected by this skin condition. In a 2009 systematic literature review of 21 observational studies and 6 clinical trials, the association between acne and diet was evaluated. Observational studies, including 2 large controlled prospective trials, reported that cow's milk intake increased acne prevalence and severity. Furthermore, prospective studies, including randomized controlled trials, demonstrated a positive association between a high-glycemic-load diet, hormonal mediators, and acne risk. Based on these findings, there exists convincing data supporting the role of dairy products and high-glycemic-index foods in influencing hormonal and inflammatory factors, which can increase acne prevalence and severity



1-s2.0-S2212267212019235-gr2.jpg


glycemic-index.jpg

 Diet Protocol: The proper diet protocol to follow would be Paleo. That means total abstience from dairy, dairy-like products, and milk by-products. Some of you, will immedietely see results just by stoping the intake of milk. However, it is my reccomendation that you also follow proper carb intake. Both of these, together, compliment eachother to supercharge your results. Proper carbohydrate, in the diet, is the single most important factor for health (diet-wise). This usually means that carbs only come from vegetables, fruits, and sometimes oatmeal or the like. No potatoes, french fries, pastries, bread, baked goods, pasta, chips, ect.

 

A good exaple demonstrating glycemic load is white bread. Look at the back for nutrition information on white bread. It is, essentially, just sugar and a potato. The body just breaks it down into glucose. Vegetables and fruits, on the other hand, are not acidic and contain micro-nutrients that something like pasta and bread doesn't contain.

 

Insulin is key. I have followed low carb intake to the point where my body entered ketosis: less than 50g of carbs a day. Amazing things happen. It essentially detoxifies the body. Try this out, for atleast a few weeks, and see how you feel. You will be amazed, on the changes, once all this processed crap food is cut from your diet. On this diet I have lost over 30 pounds and sit at 8% bodyfat year round.

 

I understand that this asking a lot. Do not simply just take my words for it. Do the research yourself and even expirement on your own body to see what works for you. Remember, you are literally "what you eat."


Edited by Absthethics, 19 August 2013 - 06:53 AM.


#2 Rosalie324

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 10:17 PM

Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 

 

I am currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!



#3 LewisS

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 12:32 AM

Moved to diet and holistic health. 



#4 Absthethics

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:15 AM

Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 

 

I am currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.

 

While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).


Edited by Absthethics, 19 August 2013 - 05:14 AM.


#5 biggs881

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:21 AM

Diet and Acne
Consideration of a role for diet in contributing to acne arose in the 1930s, and chocolate, sugar, and iodine were among the dietary factors implicated. As a result of a series of studies in the late 1960s that failed to identify a dietary connection, the concept fell out of fashion. However, the debate has been rekindled in response to a variety of data emerging over the last decade.
A retrospective recall-based study in adult nurses and a prospective self-assessment study in teenage girls both suggested an association between acne and intake of milk and other dairy products. A subsequent prospective study in teenage boys suggested an association with skim milk, although the previous 2 studies did not identify a difference based on milk fat content.
The effects on acne of glycemic load in the diet also have been subjected to examination. An anthropologic study comparing acne rates in a hunter-gatherer population in Papua New Guinea versus those in the developed world suggested that dietary glycemic load may contribute to the observed differences in acne incidence. A number of prospective trials subsequently have been performed, notably including a randomized prospective controlled trial of a low glycemic diet versus a high glycemic diet in teenage boys. By the end of the 12-week study, the low glycemic diet was shown to provide superior reduction in the number of total acne lesions (−23.5 ± 3.9 vs −12.0 ± 3.5, P = .03), as well as reductions in inflammatory lesion count and other parameters including weight and BMI.
Other dietary constituents that are the subject of renewed interest include zinc and antioxidants; the role of chocolate is being reinvestigated in a blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial (clinicaltrials.gov). Based on the currently available data, it is difficult to point with certainty to any dietary manipulation that should be recommended to pediatric patients suffering from acne; however, consideration may be given in individual cases to institution of a low glycemic diet. Patient and parent education to dispel acne myths is an important treatment consideration.

Quote from here



#6 Absthethics

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 06:47 AM

1.) [Evaluation of biological and clinical potential of paleolithic diet]. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22642064

Accumulating evidences suggest that foods that were regularly consumed during the human primates and evolution, in particular during the Paleolithic era (2.6-0.01 x 10(6) years ago), may be optimal for the prevention and treatment of some chronic diseases. It has been postulated that fundamental changes in the diet and other lifestyle conditions that occurred after the Neolithic Revolution, and more recently with the beginning of the Industrial Revolution are too recent taking into account the evolutionary time scale for the human genome to have completely adjust. In contemporary Western populations at least 70% of daily energy intake is provided by foods that were rarely or never consumed by Paleolithic hunter-gatherers, including grains, dairy products as well as refined sugars and highly processed fats. Additionally, compared with Western diets, Paleolithic diets, based on recently published estimates of macronutrient and fatty acid intakes from an East African Paleolithic diet, contained more proteins and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and less linoleic acid. Observational studies of hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations lend support to the notion that a Paleolithic type diet may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, acne vulgaris and myopia. Moreover, preliminary intervention studies using contemporary diet based on Paleolithic food groups (meat, fish, shellfish, fresh fruits and vegetables, roots, tubers, eggs, and nuts), revealed promising results including favorable changes in risk factors, such as weight, waist circumference, C-reactive protein, glycated haemoglobin (HbAlc), blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles. Low calcium intake, which is often considered as a potential disadvantage of the Paleolithic diet model, should be weighed against the low content of phytates and the low content of sodium chloride, as well as the high amount of net base yielding vegetables and fruits. Increasing number of evidences supports the view that intake of high glycemic foods and insulinotropic dairy products is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of acne vulgaris in Western countries. In this context, diets that mimic the nutritional characteristics of diets found in hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations may have therapeutic value in treating acne vulgaris. Additionally, more studies is needed to determine the impact of gliadin, specific lectins and saponins on intestinal permeability and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

 

2.) Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19209185

 

CONCLUSIONS: Even short-term consumption of a paleolithic type diet improves BP and glucose tolerance, decreases insulin secretion, increases insulin sensitivity and improves lipid profiles without weight loss in healthy sedentary humans.

 

 

3.) Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22870349

 

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of industrialized food and fast food distribution of Westernized countries. An attenuation of mTORC1 signaling is only possible by increasing the consumption of vegetables and fruit, the major components of vegan or Paleolithic diets. The dermatologist bears a tremendous responsibility for his young acne patients who should be advised to modify their dietary habits in order to reduce activating stimuli of mTORC1, not only to improve acne but to prevent the harmful and expensive march to other mTORC1-related chronic diseases later in life.


Edited by Absthethics, 19 August 2013 - 06:48 AM.


#7 alternativista

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 07:07 AM

Very nice compilation. We do have a pinned collection of studies but it was created by a moderator as a closed thread, and no moderator has been maintaining it. And of course, many threads. Once there was very active discussion on research here.

#8 nikkimixam

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:08 AM


Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I am currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).

I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.

#9 Absthethics

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:13 AM

 


Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I am currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).

I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.

 

Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.



#10 nikkimixam

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:20 AM


 



Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.

I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.

#11 Absthethics

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:30 AM

 

 


 



Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.

I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.

I don't think that is true. Fructose gets converted to the same substrates as glucose to go into cell mitochondria. Now, post workout, you will likely deplete muscle and liver glycogen. The body will first use the fructose to top off these stores, just like glucose, and then any excess will be used for energy needs or converted to fat. That is why you don't go crazy on fruit, even on paleo. I suggest you stop supplementation because you are young and on the paleo diet you will experience optimum health benefits from natural food. I would also read books such as "The Primal Blueprint" and anything by Loren Cordain.

 

here's a good place to start:


Edited by Absthethics, 19 August 2013 - 08:31 AM.


#12 nikkimixam

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:28 PM


 


 



 




Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.
I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.
I don't think that is true. Fructose gets converted to the same substrates as glucose to go into cell mitochondria. Now, post workout, you will likely deplete muscle and liver glycogen. The body will first use the fructose to top off these stores, just like glucose, and then any excess will be used for energy needs or converted to fat. That is why you don't go crazy on fruit, even on paleo. I suggest you stop supplementation because you are young and on the paleo diet you will experience optimum health benefits from natural food. I would also read books such as "The Primal Blueprint" and anything by Loren Cordain.
 
here's a good place to start:

I'm going to read that book as soon as my friend lets me borrow it!:) Do you recommend a colon or liver cleanse at all? I was thinking of doing a little cleanse on my week vacation I have coming up. My digestion is horrible.

#13 Absthethics

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 06:12 AM

 

 


 


 



 




Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.
I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.
I don't think that is true. Fructose gets converted to the same substrates as glucose to go into cell mitochondria. Now, post workout, you will likely deplete muscle and liver glycogen. The body will first use the fructose to top off these stores, just like glucose, and then any excess will be used for energy needs or converted to fat. That is why you don't go crazy on fruit, even on paleo. I suggest you stop supplementation because you are young and on the paleo diet you will experience optimum health benefits from natural food. I would also read books such as "The Primal Blueprint" and anything by Loren Cordain.
 
here's a good place to start:

I'm going to read that book as soon as my friend lets me borrow it!smile.png Do you recommend a colon or liver cleanse at all? I was thinking of doing a little cleanse on my week vacation I have coming up. My digestion is horrible.

 


I have no experience with cleanses. I can't make a recommendation.


Edited by Absthethics, 21 August 2013 - 06:33 AM.


#14 nikkimixam

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 07:12 AM


 


 



 



 




 





Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.
I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.
I don't think that is true. Fructose gets converted to the same substrates as glucose to go into cell mitochondria. Now, post workout, you will likely deplete muscle and liver glycogen. The body will first use the fructose to top off these stores, just like glucose, and then any excess will be used for energy needs or converted to fat. That is why you don't go crazy on fruit, even on paleo. I suggest you stop supplementation because you are young and on the paleo diet you will experience optimum health benefits from natural food. I would also read books such as "The Primal Blueprint" and anything by Loren Cordain.
 
here's a good place to start:
I'm going to read that book as soon as my friend lets me borrow it!smile.png Do you recommend a colon or liver cleanse at all? I was thinking of doing a little cleanse on my week vacation I have coming up. My digestion is horrible.
 

I have no experience with cleanses. I can't make a recommendation.

How was your digestion prior to all of this?

#15 Absthethics

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:08 AM

 

 


 


 



 



 




 





Woah... That's some intense stuff up there ^^ haha! 
 
I currently on a dairy, gluten, soy, and caffeine free diet. Most carbs I consume are complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice, buckwheat, etc.). I can't go on the Paleo diet (as much as I want to) because I am B12 deficient, anemic, plus I can't risk weight loss. Is my current diet in any way a substitute for going completely Paleo? I think cutting out dairy was a major component to help reduce inflammatory acne by itself. I'm sure my regimen and supplements don't hurt as well!

You can't be b12 defecient on Paleo, because of all the protein consumption. Unfortuentely, paleo states that grains, even complex ones, are bad for the body. Grains have evolved to try and not be eaten. They contain anti-nutrients and compounds which irritate our digestive system and cause low chronic inflammation. You can read books on this or look at studies.Grains have only become a staple of the human diet with the advent of the Agricultural Evolution. Prehistoric humans, which contain DNA equal to ours have survived on high fat-high protein diets with virtually no grain or dairy intake for millions of years. They have virtually no incidents of cancer, modern disease, and acne.
 
While, you're diet is certaintly better than eating french fries and donuts it is not completely Paleo and those carbs still affect insulin/nutrient uptake. Therefore, you will likely not experience the same level of results had you go on full paleo. If you still need carbs I suggest Oatmeal, Quinoa, and sweet potato(not white potato).
I've been paleo for almost two months now and my acne didn't start really improving Until I cut down on my sweet potato intake because that was the only starchy carb I was eating. I weight lift, so I was eating anywhere from 2-3 sweet potatoes a day to gain muscle. However, I cut it out for a couple of weeks to see if my skin would improve and it Did! I was only eating meats, healthy fats, low starchy veggies and the occasional strawberries. I tried eating another sweet potato twice this past week (one on monday and one on Thursday) and I got some minor under the skin bumps! On top of that, I got super bloated and was continuously burping for some time after AND I felt really sleepy. So, it seems like even sweet potatoes are out for me. I've read that even oats contain antinutrients and are gut irritating as well. I've tried reintroducing rice and got diarrhea for the entire day after. What's left for me to consume starchy carb wise for postworkout? Squash? It appears that any carb in general might not agree with me at this point. As for supplements, I'm currently taking cod liver oil, milk thistle extract, and a prenatal. I've also been extremely constipated so yesterday I started taking triphala and am going to drink some physillium husk. I still have yet to go to the restroom. We will see what happens!

Also wanted to add that on top of paleo, I've also been doing the autoimmune protocol which means no eggs, nuts, seeds, alcohol, NSAIDS and nightshades. I tried adding cayenne pepper in yesterday. My stomach didn't feel upset or anything so ill just have to wait several days to see if I break out from it as I heard there can be delayed reactions.
 
Paleo experts write in books for recommending paleo for athletes advocate sweet potatoes (as they are somehow paleo, while white potato isn't). If you can't tolerate that then just get your carbs from fruits and veggies. More bananas, peaches, apples, ect. Squash, cucumbers, mushrooms... I would avoid milk thistle. Don't worry to much about supplementation. High veggie/fruit diet contains many times the RDA values for minerals and vitamins. I, also, personally use Almond milk as a dairy substitute.
I've read in my paleo book, "It Starts with Food," that carbs from fruits aren't suitable postworkout because they refuel the liver, not the muscles so therefore they shouldn't be consumed postworkout because your muscles did the work, not your liver. That book also suggest that a sweet potato and some protein is ideal postworkout. So therefore, im screwed. Haha...why do you suggest i stop the milk thistle? I also forgot to mention that i drink about a tsp of apple cider vinegar with each meal as well and apply it topically. Seems to be helping some.
I don't think that is true. Fructose gets converted to the same substrates as glucose to go into cell mitochondria. Now, post workout, you will likely deplete muscle and liver glycogen. The body will first use the fructose to top off these stores, just like glucose, and then any excess will be used for energy needs or converted to fat. That is why you don't go crazy on fruit, even on paleo. I suggest you stop supplementation because you are young and on the paleo diet you will experience optimum health benefits from natural food. I would also read books such as "The Primal Blueprint" and anything by Loren Cordain.
 
here's a good place to start:
I'm going to read that book as soon as my friend lets me borrow it!smile.png Do you recommend a colon or liver cleanse at all? I was thinking of doing a little cleanse on my week vacation I have coming up. My digestion is horrible.
 

I have no experience with cleanses. I can't make a recommendation.

How was your digestion prior to all of this?

Whey protein and milk products always lead to a lot of farting and bloating along with acne. High carbs also cause water retention, making it worse. The general quality of my bathroom "experience" improved. No bloating, and my gut is less irratable.

 

 

For others reading this, I am going to post a pic as motivation of what can happen after you begin to eat right:

 

I dont have a before pic (fat) but here is an after:

 

tumblr_lw3kzzkc8F1r85eyio1_500.jpg

 

 

I sustain this conditioning year round, effortlessly by following paleo.


Edited by Absthethics, 21 August 2013 - 08:12 AM.


#16 Rosalie324

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 12:24 PM

Wow. That's quite impressive to say that least cool2.gif How's your acne doing on Paleo?



#17 nikkimixam

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 05:37 PM

I'd post my pics with paleo too and lifting weights, but idk how haha. All I can say is I've had less fat gain this time around than when I was trying to gain while still eating grains, oats, etc.

#18 Lee1234

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:41 AM

I'm a serious weight-lifter and tried keto for a week (back when my acne as a pain in the a**). It was fun spamming meat, oil and other high fat foods. My acne cleared, as well as the majority of my oil production and I looked the leanest I'd ever looked in my life (Down from 10% to 8% caliper tested). Problem is, 2-3 days in, I crashed, hard and I felt like I was dying and I'm pretty sure I saw the light on more than a few occasions. This allowed me to discover that I'm not fat-adapted at all.

 

Now for the question. I only eat basmati rice as a carb source but if I were to cut this out, what could I eat? and how could I survive?. I mean surely eating fruits as your only carb source (I detest vegetables) would be worst than eating rice with meat, considering the fruit is a straight sugar shot, whereas the rice is always coupled with a form of protein (sometimes fat)?. Help a comrade out here D:



#19 Absthethics

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 04:26 PM

I'm a serious weight-lifter and tried keto for a week (back when my acne as a pain in the a**). It was fun spamming meat, oil and other high fat foods. My acne cleared, as well as the majority of my oil production and I looked the leanest I'd ever looked in my life (Down from 10% to 8% caliper tested). Problem is, 2-3 days in, I crashed, hard and I felt like I was dying and I'm pretty sure I saw the light on more than a few occasions. This allowed me to discover that I'm not fat-adapted at all.

 

Now for the question. I only eat basmati rice as a carb source but if I were to cut this out, what could I eat? and how could I survive?. I mean surely eating fruits as your only carb source (I detest vegetables) would be worst than eating rice with meat, considering the fruit is a straight sugar shot, whereas the rice is always coupled with a form of protein (sometimes fat)?. Help a comrade out here D:

Yeah man, that's what happens on keto. You deplete glycogen and feel like shit, until your body adapts(2-3 weeks). You can do low carb 100-150g a day, is fine. You can aslo due keto low carb for 4 days, then refeed days for the following week of high carbs- stops the feeling like shit part. Instead of rice do sweet potoes or oatmeal.



Wow. That's quite impressive to say that least cool2.gif How's your acne doing on Paleo?

No acne.



#20 Rosalie324

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:11 PM

I'm a serious weight-lifter and tried keto for a week (back when my acne as a pain in the a**). It was fun spamming meat, oil and other high fat foods. My acne cleared, as well as the majority of my oil production and I looked the leanest I'd ever looked in my life (Down from 10% to 8% caliper tested). Problem is, 2-3 days in, I crashed, hard and I felt like I was dying and I'm pretty sure I saw the light on more than a few occasions. This allowed me to discover that I'm not fat-adapted at all.

 

Now for the question. I only eat basmati rice as a carb source but if I were to cut this out, what could I eat? and how could I survive?. I mean surely eating fruits as your only carb source (I detest vegetables) would be worst than eating rice with meat, considering the fruit is a straight sugar shot, whereas the rice is always coupled with a form of protein (sometimes fat)?. Help a comrade out here D:

Yeah man, that's what happens on keto. You deplete glycogen and feel like shit, until your body adapts(2-3 weeks). You can do low carb 100-150g a day, is fine. You can aslo due keto low carb for 4 days, then refeed days for the following week of high carbs- stops the feeling like shit part. Instead of rice do sweet potoes or oatmeal.



>Wow. That's quite impressive to say that least cool2.gif How's your acne doing on Paleo?

No acne.

 

 

What was your acne like before you started Paleo? Also, were you doing anything else aside from the diet to help your skin?






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