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Help Your Skin Function - Stop Impairing It!

skin cleanser acid mantle lipid barrier sebum

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#21 alternativista

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:13 PM

I added selfies of me & my unwashed hair to my blog post.  http://dietforclears...using-soap.html



#22 Hawaii4Life

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 10:47 PM

Hey alternativista I was just wondering if you would recommend taking this form of the Linoleic acid heres the link: http://www.amazon.co...s=linoleic acid just because im still in school and I dont think i want to chance it by using a new facial product such as the oil wash you mentioned. My diet is pretty onpoint In terms of eating healthy i will occasionally have something as white bread when i cant avoid it or something slightly sweet. Anyway just wondering because all your topics really interest me and especially about this one. Thanks!



#23 alternativista

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 11:32 AM

Emulsifiers impair skin barrier function by removing the lipids & other protective substances made by your skin. In your skin. Not just the surface.  And emulsifiers aren't just in cleansers. They are used in creams & lotions to keep the ingredients blended together.

 

"Meanwhile, the number of indications and publications with critical statements regarding the use of emulsifiers in skin care products is steadily increasing. The reason for it are findings that emulsifiers can cause modifications in the horny layer:

  • They manipulate the integrity of the barrier layers which are part of the horny layers and which consist of very sensitive, so-called lipid bilayers.
  • Emulsifiers will not loose their emulsifying properties in the skin. There are exceptions: low doses of soaps which are transformed into acids like palmitic and stearic acids due to the acid milieu of the skin. These acids also are naturally present in the skin.
  • The lasting emulsifying capacity of the emulsifiers penetrated into the skin causes an increased transport of skin-own protective substances out of the skin especially when the skin comes in contact with water (shower).

For this reason, conventional creams frequently are not tolerated by consumers with skin problems as e.g. neurodermitics and psoriatics."

 

http://www.dermaviduals.com/english/publications/ingredients/emulsifiers-looking-for-alternatives.html  - (German company. The translations to English are a little off at times)

Then I looked up palmitic acid to see what it said & found this in an article about plant oils:

"The evaluation of fatty oils which are also used as lipid phase in creams specifically depends on which types of fatty acids are bonded to glycerin to which percentage (fatty oils = triglycerides: three fatty acids are bonded to one glycerin molecule). In the skin the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by enzymatic reaction of the triglycerides and then used as a substrate for various other processes.
Thus the palmitic acid of the avocado and wheat germ oil has an excellent protective effect as it is a component of the skin barrier.
Linoleic acid, a double unsaturated essential ω-6 fatty acid is chemically bonded to the ceramide I which also is an important barrier component. Larger quantities of linoleic acid can be found in grape seed, safflower and soybean oil. Just like the α-linolenic acid, a ω-3 fatty acid of linseed and rose hip oil; and γ-linolenic acid, a ω-6 fatty acid of evening primrose and borage oil, the linoleic acid is transformed into an anti-inflammatory hydroxy fatty acid (13-HODE, 13-HOTrEg, 13-HOTrE) by 15-lipoxygenase of the skin. Beyond that, γ-linolenic acid is an essential substance for those atopics who are not able to synthesize the acid from linoleic acid due to an enzyme defect."


Edited by alternativista, 17 April 2014 - 11:34 AM.


#24 alternativista

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:11 PM

So, this study is about how the necessary lipids are stimulated after the your skin is harmed.  Which would of course be a part of healing. But is this an example of how are medical and pharmaceutical researchers think?  What we need is to damage ourselves in order stimulate healing?

 

Note the bolded lines.  I'll sum up.

 

1) cleansers harm your epidermal barrier.

2)  sebum production is stimulated as a result of harming your epidermal barrier.  So it's true. The more you wash....

3) Occlusion retards recovery.  Petrolatum in most skin care products is occlusive.

 

 

The regulation of epidermal lipid synthesis by permeability barrier requirements.

Source

Metabolism Section (111F), VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA 94121.

Abstract

A major function of the skin is to prevent the loss of fluids. The barrier to fluid loss resides in the intercellular lipids (primarily sterols, fatty acids, and sphingolipids) of the stratum corneum. The epidermis is a very active site of lipid synthesis and when the permeability barrier is disrupted by topical solvents or detergents a marked stimulation of sterol, fatty acid, and sphingolipid synthesis occurs. Essential fatty acid deficient mice, with a chronic disturbance in barrier function, also have an increase in epidermal lipid synthesis. When the defect in barrier function is artificially corrected by occlusion with a water vapor impermeable membrane the increase in epidermal lipid synthesis is prevented, suggesting that water flux may be a regulatory factor. The activity of the key rate limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, HMG CoA reductase is increased following barrier disruption due to both an increased quantity of enzyme and an increase in activation state. Similarly, the activity of serine palmitoyl transferase, the rate limiting enzyme in sphingolipid synthesis is also increased following barrier disruption. Occlusion prevents the increase in HMG CoA reductase and serine palmitoyl transferase activity. When the increase in epidermal lipid synthesis is inhibited by occlusion the characteristic rapid return of stratum corneum lipids and recovery of barrier function is prevented. Moreover, when epidermal cholesterol synthesis is inhibited by lovastatin, an inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase, the rate of recovery of barrier structure and function is delayed. Similarly, B chloroalanine, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyl transferase and sphingolipid synthesis, also impairs barrier recovery. Thus, disruption of the barrier stimulates epidermal lipid synthesis which provides the lipids necessary for the repair of the barrier. The signals that initiate and coordinate this response are yet to be defined, but the understanding of this process may allow for pharmacological interventions that will specifically disrupt the barrier and allow for the transcutaneous delivery of drugs.

 

Notice the last bolded line?  An example of how the statin drugs they now want everyone to take as a 'prevantative' will harm your skin and accelerate aging.  And your epidermis isn't the only tissue it does this to. And that isn't the only important enzyme blocked or the only way statins harm you.  It also blocks your ability to turn cholesterol into hormones and vitamin D, and your ability to make coenzyme Q10.

 

-----------------------------

 

Still not using shampoo or conditioner, btw. ( and I used to use tons)  And for the past several weeks, I've just washed with water only once a week.  The waxiness I complained about is mostly gone and it seems washing my brush often is the key to that.  My hair isn't as nice and smooth as when it was coated with silicone, but it had no body then. Now i have 'big' hair.  And the silicone filled conditioners only worked that well right after i colored my hair once a month anyway. When I used it in between, it didn't work so well. 

 

I think this will work even better for anyone with short hair, especially if you style by fluffing with fingers or something. 


Edited by alternativista, 15 July 2014 - 06:52 PM.


#25 GetMeTheResults

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 10:41 PM

Emulsifiers impair skin barrier function by removing the lipids & other protective substances made by your skin. In your skin. Not just the surface.  And emulsifiers aren't just in cleansers. They are used in creams & lotions to keep the ingredients blended together.
 
"Meanwhile, the number of indications and publications with critical statements regarding the use of emulsifiers in skin care products is steadily increasing. The reason for it are findings that emulsifiers can cause modifications in the horny layer:

  • They manipulate the integrity of the barrier layers which are part of the horny layers and which consist of very sensitive, so-called lipid bilayers.
  • Emulsifiers will not loose their emulsifying properties in the skin. There are exceptions: low doses of soaps which are transformed into acids like palmitic and stearic acids due to the acid milieu of the skin. These acids also are naturally present in the skin.
  • The lasting emulsifying capacity of the emulsifiers penetrated into the skin causes an increased transport of skin-own protective substances out of the skin especially when the skin comes in contact with water (shower).
For this reason, conventional creams frequently are not tolerated by consumers with skin problems as e.g. neurodermitics and psoriatics."
 
http://www.dermaviduals.com/english/publications/ingredients/emulsifiers-looking-for-alternatives.html  - (German company. The translations to English are a little off at times)
Then I looked up palmitic acid to see what it said & found this in an article about plant oils:
"The evaluation of fatty oils which are also used as lipid phase in creams specifically depends on which types of fatty acids are bonded to glycerin to which percentage (fatty oils = triglycerides: three fatty acids are bonded to one glycerin molecule). In the skin the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by enzymatic reaction of the triglycerides and then used as a substrate for various other processes.
Thus the palmitic acid of the avocado and wheat germ oil has an excellent protective effect as it is a component of the skin barrier.Linoleic acid, a double unsaturated essential ω-6 fatty acid is chemically bonded to the ceramide I which also is an important barrier component. Larger quantities of linoleic acid can be found in grape seed, safflower and soybean oil. Just like the α-linolenic acid, a ω-3 fatty acid of linseed and rose hip oil; and γ-linolenic acid, a ω-6 fatty acid of evening primrose and borage oil, the linoleic acid is transformed into an anti-inflammatory hydroxy fatty acid (13-HODE, 13-HOTrEg, 13-HOTrE) by 15-lipoxygenase of the skin. Beyond that, γ-linolenic acid is an essential substance for those atopics who are not able to synthesize the acid from linoleic acid due to an enzyme defect."
I find it crazy that there aren't that many links when you look up " oil cleansing method" and "safflower oil", but you get a list of other riskier oils.

( and I used to use tons)  And for the past several weeks, I've just washed with water only once a week.  The waxiness I complained about is mostly gone and it seems washing my brush often is the key to that.  My hair isn't as nice and smooth as when it was coated with silicone, but it had no body then. Now i have 'big' hair.  And the silicone filled conditioners only worked that well right after i colored my hair once a month anyway. When I used it in between, it didn't work so well. 
 
I think this will work even better for anyone with short hair, especially if you style by fluffing with fingers or something. 

Would this work for someone with very oily hair who usually washes it every day (and in some occasions every other day)?

I added selfies of me & my unwashed hair to my blog post.  http://dietforclears...using-soap.html

You look great! Your hair looks nice toward the ends, but I wonder how are the roots? Is water only enough for them?

Edited by GetMeTheResults, 15 July 2014 - 10:42 PM.


#26 alternativista

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 09:23 AM

I find it crazy that there aren't that many links when you look up " oil cleansing method" and "safflower oil", but you get a list of other riskier oils.
 


>( and I used to use tons)  And for the past several weeks, I've just washed with water only once a week.  The waxiness I complained about is mostly gone and it seems washing my brush often is the key to that.  My hair isn't as nice and smooth as when it was coated with silicone, but it had no body then. Now i have 'big' hair.  And the silicone filled conditioners only worked that well right after i colored my hair once a month anyway. When I used it in between, it didn't work so well. 
 
I think this will work even better for anyone with short hair, especially if you style by fluffing with fingers or something. 

Would this work for someone with very oily hair who usually washes it every day (and in some occasions every other day)?

>
>I added selfies of me & my unwashed hair to my blog post.  http://dietforclears...using-soap.html

You look great! Your hair looks nice toward the ends, but I wonder how are the roots? Is water only enough for them?
 
 
People have been telling each other that jojoba is 'the closest to your natural sebum' for so long, that's what people tend to use. Or olive. Or coconut oil now that it is a big fad.
 
My roots are not oily at all anymore.  The roots were never an issue since stopping shampooing, at least not after the first few weeks. .The bigger issue now is the ends since I'm not using conditioner.  I do apply coconut oil or safflower. It's just that when I used to coat my hair in silicone, it was slippery and the ends just hung there nice and smooth. At least on day one after the conditioning.
 
And I used to not only wash my hair daily, I washed it in the morning because washing the night before did not cut it.  And sometimes washed it again if I needed to look good that evening.   Although for the last several years between the diet and my age I'd been able to reduce shampooing to every three days with it varying how oily it was on day 3.
 
Also I have very fine only slightly wavy hair.  The kind that really shows the grease.

Edited by alternativista, 21 July 2014 - 08:00 AM.


#27 GetMeTheResults

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 12:48 PM

I don't get it, my hair's roots look disgusting if I don't wash it on the 2nd day, as if I just came from a sweaty workout.

Have you tried the mayo+ olive oil mask for the ends?

Edited by GetMeTheResults, 16 July 2014 - 07:02 PM.


#28 alternativista

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 09:42 AM

I don't get it, my hair's roots look disgusting if I don't wash it on the 2nd day, as if I just came from a sweaty workout.

Have you tried the mayo+ olive oil mask for the ends?

 

So did mine before I started this.  And actually, I should amend what I said before, because there is a transition period.  I recall the waxy coating on the back of my head as being my biggest problem, but I did use constarch/cocoa powder dry shampoo fairly regularly at first, which would be for the oil at the roots.   That cornstarch thing never worked for me until I read a tip about adding cocoa powder for dark hair.  And I think the cocoa powder must have some good oil absorbing powers of it's own, because now it works.

 

I put coconut oil on the ends, especially after I use henna.  And usually rub my oily hands on the ends on a near daily basis after applying safflower oil to my legs.



#29 GetMeTheResults

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:55 PM

Kitoko oil is supposed to add a lot of shine and gloss to the hair, especially if done as a hot oil treatment.

#30 firenature

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:06 AM

Yesterday I bought black seed oil (organic) and applied it as a moisturizer. Today I woke up and my pimples (ALL) are almost healed overnight!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Cant believe it. My skin is soft and not itchy, very calm. Oh, I so hope this will help. 






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