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Getting A Dermatologist In The Uk

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Hello!

I was just wondering how I'd go around getting a dermatologist in the UK on the NHS (or if that's even possible). In the future I'd more than happy go private, but I doubt my parents would be willing to pay for that. I wouldn't mind paying fee's each time I go, which I'm sure I'd have to, but just like having a dentist in the UK, can I get a derm that I make appointments with and pay at each visit?

Thanks :)

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You can go NHS, the way they seem to do it is if you have had 2 treatments of antibiotics from your GP for acne but its still giving you grief you will be referred to a dermatologist at your nearest hospital. I'm sure you can just ask for a referral though, I did to my GP and she mentioned she was going to refer me anyway (due to that antibiotics policy).

It does take a long time on the NHS though, I was referred back in mid-ish January and my appointment is set for the 26th of April - its not quick by any means but I don't mind since its free and I really cannot afford to pay.

So it depends if you want to wait a few months for it or not. If not, private is the way to go, not sure about payments each time though.

Hope this helps


If you have nothing to be grateful for; check your pulse.


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I'm not sure if dermatologists apply (don't see why not though) but you can jump the queue if you pay for a private consultation, but then everything else will be covered on the NHS including follow-up consultations. A private consultation usually costs between £100-£150. Both my husband and I have done this to see specialists without waiting the huge queue times.

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Thanks for the info. I basically just want to be able to discuss my skin with somebody that understands skin and is educated in that area of medicine. If I went to my GP about my skin he would say it looks fine, which it does, but my skin is overly oily and sensitive most of the time and still acne-prone. If I didn't put extreme effort into keeping it 95% clear, it would be a mess.

I emailed Harley Street Dermatology Clinic and they told me that there's lots of treatments for oily skin, it's just whether NHS doctors would see it that way and think my skin was severe enough to treat it. I sometimes wish I had severe acne so I could get accutane...

I think severe acne and persistent mild acne should be treated exactly the same, not disregarded just because it looks okay.

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Have you spoken to your gp? I used to see a dermatologist many years ago for a rash on my face. One time I had a bad breakout but couldn't get a quick appointment with my derm, so I went to see my GP instead. She was very knowledgeable and educated me about my rash more than my derm ever did. I think maybe the derm was so used to seeing people with really severe skin conditions that my little rash was a waste of his time. It was through my GP that I was finally able to get rid of the rash and I'd been seeing a dermatologist for about 3 years - needless to say, I never went back to him!

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In January my doctor referred me to a private dermatologist at my local private hospital to discuss my acne and post inflammation hyperpigmentation (because my GP was pretty clueless about what to do with me). I got an appointment within 4 days of my doctor's referral. Luckily, my Dad gets private health insurance through his work so I was able to use this to cover the cost of the appointment. If I had not have been able to have this then my 30 minute chat (you get a longer consultation time if you go private) with a derm would have cost me £300. The good thing was that after the derm had made her recommendations I went back to my GP and he prescribed these for me on the NHS so I wouldn't have to pay for them privately (it may be worth discussing this with your GP).

In February I was referred to see a derm but on the NHS this time (to discuss Accutane). The earliest appointment I was able to get is the 2nd May, so I'm stillllllllll waiting (and my skin is getting progressively worse during this wait).

If you've got the money, then I think it would be worth going private because you will be seen so much sooner and for a longer appointment (also in the waiting room of the private hospital they gave me free biscuits... wink.png ).

Plus, I reeeeeaaally recommend seeing a derm whether it's privately or on the NHS. I was amazed by my derm's knowledge after having my GP call my post inflammation hyperpigmentation "funny red marks" for so long :)


16th May-27th October 2013

15 Years Old/Female/52kg

Month 1- 20mg

Month 2- 40mg

Month 3- 40mg

Month 4- 50mg

Month 5 and 1/2- 50mg

Also see page 4 on my log for the before and after photos :)

"You can't make a rainbow without a little rain"


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This may be too late - sorry if it its;

If you've had 2 unsuccessful courses of antibiotics with your GP then they can refer you. It does take a while, but often you'll end up seeing a Dermatologist who does both NHS and private work, so it's really about whether you're happy to wait. I saw one privately last year (Dr Tamara Griffiths in Manchester if you happen to be in the North West!) and she was great, though mine is *slowly* getting worse (and I'm on my 3rd antibiotic) so I'm going to request a referral to a dermatologist on the NHS.

Bear in mind that, whilst your GP might not know as much as dermatologist (and I know how frustrating this is!), they're able to prescribe ANYTHING (bar oral Isotretinoin - (Ro)Accutane) that a dermatologist could - so if you do your research and request a certain topical/systemic treatment then they will probably give it to you.

Be wary of going to a 'clinic' - whilst they offer fantastic treatment and service, they often sell 'procedures' as opposed to medical treatment, so I'd ask friends/medical professionals for names if you do decide to go private. I'd also look at the dermatology staff at your local teaching hospital - many consultants also do private work and if so, there's likely to be a fair amount of info about them online!

I hope this helps; I know what a pain GPs can be with acne!

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Thanks for the info. I basically just want to be able to discuss my skin with somebody that understands skin and is educated in that area of medicine. If I went to my GP about my skin he would say it looks fine, which it does, but my skin is overly oily and sensitive most of the time and still acne-prone. If I didn't put extreme effort into keeping it 95% clear, it would be a mess.

I emailed Harley Street Dermatology Clinic and they told me that there's lots of treatments for oily skin, it's just whether NHS doctors would see it that way and think my skin was severe enough to treat it. I sometimes wish I had severe acne so I could get accutane...

I think severe acne and persistent mild acne should be treated exactly the same, not disregarded just because it looks okay.


Post Roaccutane (finished December 2013) Regimen: MorningSimple Refreshing Facial WashPaula's Choice 2% BHA and 8% AHA Gels

Finacea 15% Azelaic Acid

Medik8 C- tetra

La Roche Posay Hydraphase Eyes with hyaluronic acid

Eucerin UltraSensitive Soothing Care for Normal-Combination Skin

La Roche Posay Dry Touch SPF 50+Nivea Lip Care Sun Protect SPF 30MAC Studio Fix Fluid NW10, No7 Perfect Light Loose Powder - TranslucentEveningSimple Refreshing Facial WashDifferin 0.1% Adapalene La a Roche a Posay Lipikar Baume with Niacinamide <p>Vaseline100% acne free and left only with the faintest few red marks and shallow scarring. Products no longer used for acne prevention/treatment but for anti-ageing and hyper pigmentation (mostly just freckled now rather than post acne!)


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