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Scar Removal Methods

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Hi There,

I bought the Dr Roller 3 Line, 1.5mm Derma roller and the Titanium Needle Derma stamp 1.5mm from Ebay. I just purchased a new Derma stamp from Ebay * Moderator Edit, No Links Allowed, review the board rules.* I would recommend that you do the treatments every 4-6 weeks as it gives the skin time to heal. My regime is as follows:

  • Wash and dry the area to be treated
  • Apply numbing cream for around 45 mins and wipe clean after
  • Derma Roll/stamp skin, following instructions
  • Clean area with Distilled witch hazel
  • Use a collagen boosting cream (I use Terproline as suggested by another user from here).
I hope this helps. I totally agree with your comments about saliva, It is a natural healer and worth looking into. I will look at the links you sent, thanks for that. I will try anything that helps, this site is great as we can all help each other. Its good genuine advice, we are all in the same boat and its better to hear from real people that have tried and tested these treatments. But sometimes some people have different success than others, but it's all worth a try. I haven't tried Fat transfer yet but have thought a lot about it and would like to try. I hear Juvederm is good, but think our own fat may react better as it's our own and is less likely to be rejected. Are you in the UK? I am in the UK. I would like to chat with you some more, would be good to discuss our ideas.

I appreciate your response, I'm going to buy a derma roller soon. Can't wait to start rolling, what is your downtime like afterwards? Or was there any?If i used make up would that hide it? I got the idea of saliva, because many people have used it. Also, whenever I cry it starts healing my face, it's so weird actually. But there is so much LOGIC behind it that I could go on all day and explain why. I feel your emotions during healing are more important than anything. it's complicated..and no i don't live in the uk =/ but it's awesome having a friend there (you) you should check out my other thread i have recently started it contains good information and i hope it continues to grow

Not much down time really, around a day of redness but it all depends on your skin type. I usually do my treatments on a Friday night so i have the weekend to let my skin heal and breath. We are now Derma rolling friends lol. Are u in the UK? If so we can maybe talk over the phone if you want about this stuff

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Hi There,

I bought the Dr Roller 3 Line, 1.5mm Derma roller and the Titanium Needle Derma stamp 1.5mm from Ebay. I just purchased a new Derma stamp from Ebay * Moderator Edit, No Links Allowed, review the board rules.* I would recommend that you do the treatments every 4-6 weeks as it gives the skin time to heal. My regime is as follows:

  • Wash and dry the area to be treated
  • Apply numbing cream for around 45 mins and wipe clean after
  • Derma Roll/stamp skin, following instructions
  • Clean area with Distilled witch hazel
  • Use a collagen boosting cream (I use Terproline as suggested by another user from here).
I hope this helps. I totally agree with your comments about saliva, It is a natural healer and worth looking into. I will look at the links you sent, thanks for that. I will try anything that helps, this site is great as we can all help each other. Its good genuine advice, we are all in the same boat and its better to hear from real people that have tried and tested these treatments. But sometimes some people have different success than others, but it's all worth a try. I haven't tried Fat transfer yet but have thought a lot about it and would like to try. I hear Juvederm is good, but think our own fat may react better as it's our own and is less likely to be rejected. Are you in the UK? I am in the UK. I would like to chat with you some more, would be good to discuss our ideas.

I appreciate your response, I'm going to buy a derma roller soon. Can't wait to start rolling, what is your downtime like afterwards? Or was there any?If i used make up would that hide it? I got the idea of saliva, because many people have used it. Also, whenever I cry it starts healing my face, it's so weird actually. But there is so much LOGIC behind it that I could go on all day and explain why. I feel your emotions during healing are more important than anything. it's complicated..and no i don't live in the uk =/ but it's awesome having a friend there (you) you should check out my other thread i have recently started it contains good information and i hope it continues to grow

Not much down time really, around a day of redness but it all depends on your skin type. I usually do my treatments on a Friday night so i have the weekend to let my skin heal and breath. We are now Derma rolling friends lol. Are u in the UK? If so we can maybe talk over the phone if you want about this stuff


My Regimen.. accutane

If anyone cares to read this and I manage to stop 1 person to avoid going on Accutane, then its served its purpose.

PM me if you'd like to chat. ACNE is ENTIRELY curable through natural ways. Please don't feel pushed or pressured or helpless that you think you must resort to this drug.

I'm not a crazy natural person (nut job lol) just a 27 year old guy who has been through it all and can offer genuinely good advice. You can see by my profile how long i've been around this forum.


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Sep. 24, 2013 — Millions of people with scars suffer from pain, discomfort, and inability to perform regular activities. Some may have to revert to addicting pain medicine to get rid of their ailments. Now, and with a new methodology, such problems can be treated successfully. A technique using injection of the patient's own fat cells is an effective treatment for hard, contracted scars resulting from burns or other causes, reports a study in the September issue of The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, edited by Mutaz B. Habal, MD, FRCSC, and published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Dr. Marco Klinger and coauthors of Università degli Studi di Milano report good results with fat grafting in hundreds of patients with difficult-to-treat scars causing pain and limited motion. "For scar treatment, where medical and surgical therapies seem to be ineffective especially in the long term, autologous fat graft has proven to be a new chance to repair tissue damage," the researchers write.

Fat Grafting Shows Promise as Treatment for Scars Dr. Klinger and colleagues used autologous fat grafting to treat persistent scarring problems in nearly 700 patients over six years. ("Autologous" means using the patient's own tissues.) All patients had abnormal, painful scars causing hardening or tightening of the skin, often with limitation of motion. The scars -- resulting from burns, surgery, or other causes -- had not improved with other treatments.

The fat grafting procedure began with liposuction to collect a small amount of the patient's own fat tissue -- usually from the abdomen or hips. After processing, surgeons reinjected the fat cells under the skin in the area of scarring. Fat was distributed in different directions, with the goal of creating a "web" of support for scarred, damaged skin.

Fat grafting led to significant improvement "both from an aesthetic and functional point of view," according to Dr. Klinger and coauthors. The skin in the scarred area became "softer and more flexible and extensible, and very often color seem[ed] similar to the surrounding unharmed skin."

After fat grafting, the patients had decreased pain and increased scar elasticity. Improvement began within two weeks, continued through three months, and persisted through one year and beyond. In a subgroup of patients, objective testing of skin hardness and clinical ratings by doctors and patients provided further evidence of treatment benefits.

Fat Cells Lead to Improved Function as Well as Appearance Treatment was associated with improved motion in areas where movement was limited because of tightness and stiffness of contracted scars. For example, in patients with scarring after burns to the face, fat grafting led to improved facial motion.

Fat grafting helped solve other difficult surgical problems as well. In one case, a breast cancer patient was left with hard, painful scars after complications from breast reconstruction. Treatment with fat grafting allowed a successful second breast reconstruction to be performed.

In recent years, there has been renewed interest in techniques using the patient's own fat for reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgery. The new experience suggests that fat grafting may provide an effective new "regenerative medicine" technique for patients with difficult-to-treat scars.

It's not yet clear exactly how fat grafting exerts its benefits in scarred tissues. One factor may be the fact that fat tissue includes stem cells, which can develop into many different types of cells active in the wound healing and tissue repair process.

Dr. Klinger and coauthors believe their experience shows fat grafting is a "promising and effective therapeutic approach" to scars from various causes -- not only burns and other forms of trauma but also after surgery or radiation therapy. "[T]reated areas regain characteristics similar to normal skin," leading not only to improved appearance but also improved function in patients with problematic scars that don't respond to other treatments.

taken from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130924122451.htm

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Datura, I'm thinking about having dermal grafts done and then a fat transfer to sagging, rolling type scars. I want to have dermal grafts done on boxcar and maybe a few ice picks. I'm curious to know how much it generally costs to receive dermal grafts. I have a doctor here in Indy that does it, but I am not sure how much skill is required behind it. From what I read, it seems like a relatively simple procedure. I don't want to get a lot of them done maybe like 16 at most? How is the skin afterwards? I read somewhere that the skin gets an odd texture if it is dry. I'm not too worried about that though, because I would rather have dry skin than a crater. I'm really impressed with the 90%+ improvement. That's fantastic & I'm genuinely happy for you. Sorry for all of the questions. Hope you can get back to me soon. Thanks so much.

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Some doctors use subcision and then use fat transfer as a filler.

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I have some questions about dermal grafts, if anyone could please answer.

I know they work best in small places and are more likely to take.

I wanted to know, do they look more normal than an acne scar?

I want to get this done, combined with a fat transfer to areas that just have tissue loss (when stretched they disappear.)

I have read mixed reviews on dermal grafts I am also confused are punch grafts and dermal grafts the same thing? What's the difference between them?

I'm going to try to go get dermal grafts done as soon as I get the money, but I'm hoping it's not too much.

Questions about dermal grafts

Do they look normal once the healing process is over?

How long is the healing process?

How long should you let the area avoid sun?

What methods, if any are used to "blend" the treated area. (Lasers, dermarolling, or just waiting until time passes)

Do the areas treated eventually gain pigment. For example, will they always remain lighter/darker than the surrounding skin?

Thanks so much please answer.

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I have some questions about dermal grafts, if anyone could please answer.

I know they work best in small places and are more likely to take.

I wanted to know, do they look more normal than an acne scar?

I want to get this done, combined with a fat transfer to areas that just have tissue loss (when stretched they disappear.)

I have read mixed reviews on dermal grafts I am also confused are punch grafts and dermal grafts the same thing? What's the difference between them?

I'm going to try to go get dermal grafts done as soon as I get the money, but I'm hoping it's not too much.

Questions about dermal grafts

Do they look normal once the healing process is over?

How long is the healing process?

How long should you let the area avoid sun?

What methods, if any are used to "blend" the treated area. (Lasers, dermarolling, or just waiting until time passes)

Do the areas treated eventually gain pigment. For example, will they always remain lighter/darker than the surrounding skin?

Thanks so much please answer.

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