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Acne Redness Removal Trick

ice cysts home remedies inflamed acne

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#1 CBIOT13

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 01:11 PM

Hello, I have been using successfully using ice for the last few years to quickly bring down the redness and swelling of inflammed pimples. After reading some posts on here about people looking for quick acne fixes, this is about the best you can get so I figured I'd type up exactly how to do it.

 

Personally, I don't have a ton of acne but when I do I get those large, deep, swollen, red cysts that just seem to pop up out of nowhere. And if I wake up with one on a day I have a presentation, date, party, or other important function then this is what I do to bring it down to a manageable size and reduce it's appearance.

 

Yes, it is just icing it but you can significantly increase the effectiveness if you add a little more thought to it. 

 

Here's the Routine:

 

1) Grab yourself an ice cube from the fridge, take about 4 squares of toilet paper, fold the TP in half once and then place the ice cube in it. 

2) Place the ice directly on the zit. You want the entire zit completely in contact with the ice/TP. Add light pressure as well. Do this for only 10 min

3) Remove ice, gently dry your face (the ice melt will drip all over), then wait 10 min

4) After the waiting period is over repeat step 2 one more time

 

 

Tips

 

-The waiting period is important so you don't give your skin frostbite. Do NOT skip it. 

-Also, only do the routine once every hour. Again, this is to prevent skin damage.

-The minute you take the ice off, yes it will look all red and much worse. But after 10 or 15 minutes the redness goes away and you've put a significant dent into the lifespan of that pimple.

-You may notice dry skin in the area you are icing. It's the price you pay for getting rid of the zit.

-You should never attempt to pop a cyst, but if you did and it got super red and swollen, this will help immensely

 

 

Again, I use this all the time for acne of all kinds, but it is especially effective for swollen and painful acne. The ice reduces swelling and redness by constricting blood supply to the zit, which in turn helps kill bacteria that are attempting to multiply in the zit. I've gotten bad zits in the morning and then done the double-icing routine a few times during the day, then had it down to a manageable appearance by that night. 

 

Disclaimer: Everyone's skin is different. Quite frankly, this does sting because you are essentially flash-freezing the pimple. The wait times I've built in are what work for me. They should work for you, but if any pain becomes unbearable stop and wait longer in between icing. On the rare occasion you did slightly ice-burn your skin, it may just be very dry and have a very faint tan hue to the spot for a day or two and then it will go away without any marks.

 

Good Luck smile.png

 

 

 


 


Edited by CBIOT13, 30 March 2013 - 01:21 PM.


#2 IDK111

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 04:50 PM

Hey you!

:)

 

I like icing method too!!!  Thanks for this tip.  I have always just put ice in a plastic bag, and then put it on my face.  I've never let ice get that close to my face because I would get that frostbite feeling that you say. lmao   But I will definately try out the waiting times too!!!



#3 CBIOT13

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 11:10 PM

Hey wink.png

Lol yea I felt compelled to make a topic on it because I it literally saved my butt LOL

I had a date that night and woke up with a nice red, raised zit right by my mouth. Some agressive icing as described above completely took away the redness and dramtically reduced the swelling. By 8 Pm you couldn't even see it smile.png

EDIT: Wow just saw my post. That is the weirdest "winking'' emoticon I've ever seen haha


Edited by CBIOT13, 01 April 2013 - 08:29 AM.


#4 onefatalgoose

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 06:36 PM

Here's another trick.  Eye drops

 

They won't help with inflammation of the actual pimple, but if it's redness we're talking about, it works miracles.  Back when i was using proactiv (years ago) my face was always bright red.  I'd apply visine to my eyes in the morning and sometimes it'd run down my cheek.  Fifteen minutes later there would be a white streak on my face where the visine had run down.  The same mechanism that makes the eyes less red works on the skin

 

I'm all about natural solutions, but if you're in an emergency situation and need redness relief...this is extremely fast



#5 CBIOT13

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:17 PM

Here's another trick.  Eye drops

 

They won't help with inflammation of the actual pimple, but if it's redness we're talking about, it works miracles.  Back when i was using proactiv (years ago) my face was always bright red.  I'd apply visine to my eyes in the morning and sometimes it'd run down my cheek.  Fifteen minutes later there would be a white streak on my face where the visine had run down.  The same mechanism that makes the eyes less red works on the skin

 

I'm all about natural solutions, but if you're in an emergency situation and need redness relief...this is extremely fast

 

Yea that stuff in there is actually a bleaching agent. I could never use it for my eyes because it messed with my contacts, never thought to use it on skin though.


Edited by CBIOT13, 01 April 2013 - 07:17 PM.


#6 onefatalgoose

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:38 PM

The reason eyedrops such as visine reduce the redness is due to the tetrahydrozoline HCI, which is a vaso constrictor.  This is why the effects only last so long, and why adding them to your eyes doesn't permanently relieve redness.  And like i said, i'd only use them for when you really need them.  



#7 CBIOT13

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:58 AM

The reason eyedrops such as visine reduce the redness is due to the tetrahydrozoline HCI, which is a vaso constrictor.  This is why the effects only last so long, and why adding them to your eyes doesn't permanently relieve redness.  And like i said, i'd only use them for when you really need them.  

Yep, and guess what that chemical is... a bleaching agent. Anything that whitens through any mechanism can be called a bleaching agent bud.

And in your post, the name "HCI" is incorrect. The second term is "HCL" which is for a hydrogen-chlorine compound, specifically if it's dissolved in water it's called hydrochloric acid. Normally the "L" is lower case so that's likely what you saw. I can't think of any compound off the the top of my head that HCI could even possibly stand for though.

Google carefully my friend.
 

 

EDIT: I just noticed this, but the mobile version of acne.org and the desktop version of acne.org use different fonts. So while on the desktop version, upper case i is exactly the same as lower case L. Your typo onefatalgoose is actually only distinguishable on the mobile version. Weird.

 

Example: Ivan and lamp

Now check this out on mobile vs desktop


Edited by CBIOT13, 02 April 2013 - 05:23 PM.


#8 pdxthrowaway

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 02:57 PM

The reason eyedrops such as visine reduce the redness is due to the tetrahydrozoline HCI, which is a vaso constrictor.  This is why the effects only last so long, and why adding them to your eyes doesn't permanently relieve redness.  And like i said, i'd only use them for when you really need them.  

Yep, and guess what that chemical is... a bleaching agent. Anything that whitens through any mechanism can be called a bleaching agent bud.

And in your post, the name "HCI" is incorrect. The second term is "HCL" which is for a hydrogen-chlorine compound, specifically if it's dissolved in water it's called hydrochloric acid. Normally the "L" is lower case so that's likely what you saw. I can't think of any compound off the the top of my head that HCI could even possibly stand for though.

Google carefully my friend.

Oh, I might use some of this


Edited by pdxthrowaway, 02 April 2013 - 02:57 PM.


#9 onefatalgoose

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:26 PM

Yep, and guess what that chemical is... a bleaching agent. Anything that whitens through any mechanism can be called a bleaching agent bud.

And in your post, the name "HCI" is incorrect. The second term is "HCL" which is for a hydrogen-chlorine compound, specifically if it's dissolved in water it's called hydrochloric acid. Normally the "L" is lower case so that's likely what you saw. I can't think of any compound off the the top of my head that HCI could even possibly stand for though.

Google carefully my friend.

 

Hah!  Why...are you such a smartass?  Just so you're aware, i've suggested the use of tetrahydrozoline in another thread a couple years back.  When looking up the full name i did in fact misread the 'L' for an 'I'. I'm so sorry eusa_think.gif   

 

Bleach is a poor term to use when the process behind the 'whitening' (lightening) is actually a restricting of blood flow to the area.  You aren't reducing color in the sense that bleaching agents work.  

 

I just 'bleached' my hand by the way by raising it above my head for five minutes.  How does that sound to you?  It's the same idea.

 

Vaso restriction is not equal to chemical bleaching.  It'd be like taking niacin and saying it's a skin dye because of it's vaso dilating effect.  You haven't dyed anything, you've increased the blood flow.  Same goes for vaso restricting. You haven't bleached anything, you've simply reduced the blood flow to that area.  

 

So...your terminology was poor.  As well as misleading



#10 CBIOT13

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:33 PM

Someones had a rough day.

A smartass? Re-read the thread bud, you tried to correct me first. Just returning the favor. 

My terminology was actually very good for the point that I was trying to get across. If I posted the definition that comes in Google like you did, I bet you might understand but do you think many else would?

 

Okay so let's say I write that it is a "vaso constrictor" along with the chemical name of the active ingredient. Oooooohhhh!! Wow factor? Yes. Technically correct? Of course. Information that can help someone? NO.

 

You have to consider your audience. Do you think some middle schooler is going to know what that means without looking it up? Information like that is useless unless you're talking with someone who understands it. Keep in mind there's a lot of younger people on this website that are looking for help with acne for the first time. I intentionally oversimplified how it works so that people would understand exactly what it does. For a thirteen year old girl with a big zit before a school dance, she's not going to give a damn that it's a "vaso constrictor," she wants to know what the end result is. Which it turns out can be described as a "bleaching" effect.

 

The idea is that while it does change the color of the pimple, it literally does nothing else for it, unlike ice which will reduce swelling and redness, kill bacteria, and reduce the chance of scarring through a shorter pimple duration. I want people to understand that 95% of the time, ice is the way to go assuming you have a few hours before you need the pimple gone. 


Edited by CBIOT13, 02 April 2013 - 06:03 PM.


#11 onefatalgoose

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:57 PM

Someones had a rough day.

A smartass? Re-read the thread bud, you tried to correct me first. Just returning the favor. 

 

 

My day has been fine.   I didn't try to correct you, i did correct you, or better, your understanding of how the eye drops actually reduces the redness.  Since your initial thought was that it was 'bleaching them' as we've come to understand the term today.  Simply wanted to make sure people understood that it was the constricting of the capillaries that was causing the skin lightening effect.  Hydroquinone would be better described as a skin bleach, as it is literally lightening the skin's color by increasing the breakdown of melanosomes, as well as decreasing their production.  Though i would never, ever recommend anyone use that stuff.  Ever.

 

And the age of acne sufferers varies incredibly on this site.  from 10-40's, and even older.  And younger people are interested in learning why something is happening just as much as older people are



#12 CBIOT13

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 07:03 PM

Someones had a rough day.

A smartass? Re-read the thread bud, you tried to correct me first. Just returning the favor. 

 

 

My day has been fine.   I didn't try to correct you, i did correct you, or better, your understanding of how the eye drops actually reduces the redness.  Since your initial thought was that it was 'bleaching them' as we've come to understand the term today.  Simply wanted to make sure people understood that it was the constricting of the capillaries that was causing the skin lightening effect.  Hydroquinone would be better described as a skin bleach, as it is literally lightening the skin's color by increasing the breakdown of melanosomes, as well as decreasing their production.  Though i would never, ever recommend anyone use that stuff.  Ever.

 

And the age of acne sufferers varies incredibly on this site.  from 10-40's, and even older.  And younger people are interested in learning why something is happening just as much as older people are

 

LOL 

 

Enjoy that little dreamworld you live in.

 

While it seems you don't, I have better things to do than argue with someone on Acne.org. But please, continue to use Google to make it seem like you know what you're talking about haha. 


Edited by CBIOT13, 02 April 2013 - 07:09 PM.


#13 onefatalgoose

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:42 PM

While it seems you don't, I have better things to do than argue with someone on Acne.org. But please, continue to use Google to make it seem like you know what you're talking about haha. 

 

Right...as you have gone out of your way to PM me about another issue, in which you were a smartass as well...and...you've carried on this argument up to this point...and you seem to take great offense when someone corrects you...(btw, my original comment regarding how the eye drops work was never meant to be argumentative, simply informative.  Aside from my misspelling)

 

Yes, it really does seem like you have more important things to do. Question mark

 

 

I love how you think anyone offering advice on this site other than yourself is becoming aware of the various issues as the thread goes on.  I've been aware of tetrahydrozoline since i was using proactiv, which was six years ago.  I've been aware of Hydroquinone since i was considering bleaching my skin a few years back.  

 

More people than just yourself CBIOT13 are interested in learning about the various health issues in the world today, and doing it correctly. And many of them, including myself, have been learning about these things for years.  From scholarly articles, journals, and various other reliable sources.  Many of these issues get covered in various other threads on this site, and are not new.  Such as your icing method.  Discussed in a thread started by Wynne on how to deal with cysts. Used to be a pinned topic, not sure if it is anymore...

 

Not saying you shouldn't have created a new thread for it, because i think it's great to bring up ideas people may have forgotten about



#14 Beezie

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 01:13 AM

woah I think putting ice on the skin like that would only cause irritation or worse frost bite lol



#15 CBIOT13

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:43 AM

Well we could do this all day bro. I think you're a wanna-be know it all and you think I'm a jack***. Duly noted, moving on. I guess I've got to be the bigger man here...

woah I think putting ice on the skin like that would only cause irritation or worse frost bite lol

Yea that's what I thought at first, but I've been doing it for years. The trick is the TP that you wrap it in provides just enough of a barrier between your ice and skin to prevent that. I used to ice alot after football games and we had big bags of ice and the trainers never used anything thicker than a paper towel as a barrier; I really think the risk of giving yourself frostbite it pretty low.

Edited by CBIOT13, 05 April 2013 - 07:22 AM.


#16 Fraz_2010

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:22 AM

The problem with iceing acne is that it flattens the spot down back into the epidermis of the skin. The risk here is that at some point it may burst, causing a rip in the epidermis, leading to indentations.

 

When you get a spot, don't try to pressure it into going back down. The best thing you can do is let it run its course and have a gentle cleanser and some moisturizer ready for when it's finally ready to burst.

 

If you're concerned about discolouration, then try covering it up with a mineral based foundation



#17 CBIOT13

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:24 AM

The problem with iceing acne is that it flattens the spot down back into the epidermis of the skin. The risk here is that at some point it may burst, causing a rip in the epidermis, leading to indentations.
 
When you get a spot, don't try to pressure it into going back down. The best thing you can do is let it run its course and have a gentle cleanser and some moisturizer ready for when it's finally ready to burst.
 
If you're concerned about discolouration, then try covering it up with a mineral based foundation


I've been doing this probably for the last 4 years with no problems. I don't understand, what exactly is going to "burst"?

#18 Fraz_2010

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:27 AM

The problem with iceing acne is that it flattens the spot down back into the epidermis of the skin. The risk here is that at some point it may burst, causing a rip in the epidermis, leading to indentations.
 
When you get a spot, don't try to pressure it into going back down. The best thing you can do is let it run its course and have a gentle cleanser and some moisturizer ready for when it's finally ready to burst.
 
If you're concerned about discolouration, then try covering it up with a mineral based foundation


I've been doing this probably for the last 4 years with no problems. I don't understand, what exactly is going to "burst"?

 

When you're icing the cyst, you're not making the cyst go away, you're sending it back down again. For some people, this is ok, because they aren't prone to scarring.

 

But for people like myself who are very scar prone, icing is a bad idea. I know from personal experience and have learnt my lesson the hard way.



#19 CBIOT13

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 09:29 AM

Huh, I've never heard of that. It's like anything though, everyone's skin reacts differently to things.

#20 Skintuition

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 10:11 PM

When my acne was at its worst this is one of the tricks I had up my sleeve. If I had anywhere important I had to be the next day I'd run to the ice cubes. It actually worked in bringing down the size and redness of some zits. 

I guess it numbs the skin or whatever so the bacteria is killed or something? I'd try this out if I were you. It really works!






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