Jump to content

Photo

Should I Bother Trying Gluten Free For Acne? Any Tips?

gluten acne gluten free eggs

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
15 replies to this topic

#1 Lilly75

Lilly75

    Veteran Member

  • Moderators
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,440
    Likes: 454
About Me
  • Joined: 01-April 12

Achievements

     

Posted 10 March 2013 - 12:21 AM

In the last few days I've been doing a little research into gluten and acne. I don't know the topic 'inside-out' yet, but from the little that I've read, I think it's something that I might try out. I just had a few questions first...

 

Is it possible that my acne is related to gluten? I've had acne consistently since I was about 12 or 13yrs and I'm 19 (nearly 20) now. If my acne has never gone away (except through using antibiotics) is it more likely still due to hormones or could gluten have become a factor over the years? Is going gluten free worth trying at all? I hope that makes sense and someone can help me out there...

 

Also- any gluten free meal ideas? Particularly for quick on the go breakfasts and snacks I can just have in my bag for while at uni. I know fruit and veg are pretty easy but anything else for a bit of change every now and then?

 

I also had a question (though not exactly to do with gluten) about eggs - are they in general considered 'bad' for acne? or is it just on a case-by-case basis - they might be a trigger for some? If they are linked to acne - is it the whole egg or just the yolk or white that 'is to blame?' 

 

(Sorry for the bombardment of questions)

Thanks for reading - hope to find some help here :)



#2 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,543
    Likes: 1,107
About Me
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 10 March 2013 - 09:03 AM

Eggs are not bad for acne unless you are intolerant to them. Yes you should try avoiding gluten completely, and even if you don't notice a difference, you should limit it in your diet. See the pinned food and recipe thread for ideas.

#3 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 754
About Me
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:55 AM

Gluten is very inflammatory and isn't benefiting you anyway. If there's something any person should give up, gluten is it.



#4 Lilly75

Lilly75

    Veteran Member

  • Moderators
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,440
    Likes: 454
About Me
  • Joined: 01-April 12

Achievements

     

Posted 10 March 2013 - 11:14 PM

Thank you both :) I'll check out the recipe thread and see what I find. I guess eggs might be an option for breakfast still, though I have a feeling they worsen my acne so I'll have to test it. I'll cut gluten starting tomorrow morning (already had a few things with gluten today....) 

 

As far as it affecting acne though - if they were related for me, would I expect to see improvements soon after cutting it or is it the sort of thing that is sort of built up in the body and takes a while to 'heal' and then see changes?

 

Either way, I'll try it for a month at least... and even if I don't see changes, I'll be limiting the amount of gluten I have.



#5 Enimrac

Enimrac

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 120
    Likes: 6
About Me
  • Joined: 17-December 04

Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:35 AM

I think you'd be wasting your time and energy. 

 

Speaking as someone who has tried for years to eliminate acne with dietary/holistic means, I realize it was a fools errand, ESPECIALLY when there are many other medically proven methods for doing so.  You should probably find a good dermatologist who doesn't rush you out the door and actually listens to you.  Or try Dan's regimen, which is really good.  Benzoyl peroxide has actually been scientifically and medically studied, and is proven to help fight acne.  Eliminating gluten can make no such claims.

 

Also, I'd be VERY wary about taking health or dietary advice from people on message boards.  Most people on these boards speak about diet, health, nutrition, supplements, and disorders, as if they are authorities or qualified to do so.  The truth is, most if any are not, and for some reason when you read a comment or two by people on boards, they have a tendency to sound authoritative and knowledgeable, even though they are not.  People on the boards tend to exaggerate, get over enthusiastic, and speak matter of factly, without the normal ability for you to discuss and converse as you would in real life. 

 

Why would you think there was a connection between gluten and acne?  If the only reason is because you read it on a message board, it's probably not very credible.  A lot of these dietary claims, when you really think about them with common sense and clarity, actually make little sense.  Ask any dermatologist, and they will tell you there is little to no connection between foods and acne.  And you know what?  The "experts" on these boards will shoot that down and explain how western medicine is bogus, etc, etc.  Now, just take a moment and really think about these claims, the qualifications of the people making these claims, and just plain common, everyday sense. 

 

The other thing that is puzzling is the idea that somehow gluten is bad for you.  Humans have been nourished by wheat and rice since the start of civilization, and still are.  If you think you have a gluten allergy, you should talk to your doctor and take their advice, NOT the advice of people on internet message boards.  Ask your doctor if acne is a symptom of a gluten allergy, and I'd be willing to bet they say "no".  But obviously, ask them for yourself.

 

It is my opinion that a lot of diet extremists look for ways to get some kind of control over aging, over health, over appearance and beauty, and so they find ridiculous scapegoats in conventional thinking, put EXTREME restrictions on themselves, all as a way to get "control" over what they perceive as health and beauty.  IMO, it's actually very similar to the way people with eating disorders think and approach things.  To rule out eating wheat, rice, rye, barely, and any other grains that have gluten, with no existing allergy, because you think it will improve your skin, is EXTREME, and nonsensical. 

 

Controlling your acne requires being pragmatic, logical, and calm.  Engaging in these ridiculous dietary quests for clear skin is none of those.  I'm sorry if I sound harsh, but I've been there, and it's a waste of time and energy, and it diverts you from the real medications/treatments out there that can actually help you.


Edited by Enimrac, 11 March 2013 - 12:51 AM.


#6 Lilly75

Lilly75

    Veteran Member

  • Moderators
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,440
    Likes: 454
About Me
  • Joined: 01-April 12

Achievements

     

Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:11 AM

Thanks for taking the time to respond, Enimrac.

 

Although I might find an 'idea' or starting point on these message boards, I don't do anything health related without doing my own detailed research first or before consulting a GP. I want to know what I'm doing and understand if there's a possible connection. I advise other people to do the same  - make your own, well informed decisions - don't just do something because you read it here or some other public forum. I get what you mean about people not being qualified, and although I think a few are well researched and have a lot of personal experience to share, I still like to check things out myself and read up on things first before making a decision. So if I do go ahead with cutting gluten, I'm not going in totally blind. I don't think cutting it is harmful either, as long as the rest of your diet is healthy and balanced.

 

I've been down the BP road before, tried different types of antibiotics and countless over the counter acne products with no real success. I don't want to use accutane. That's why I want to try the nutritional approach as it's the thing I haven't tried. And even if it doesn't work out for my acne, I think I'll be better off for it - as far as cutting a lot of processed foods goes. I'd be better off without them anyway.

 

I don't think gluten is really bad for you - rather it is isn't that necessary really. For some people with coeliac disease I guess it is 'bad' but that's a small amount of the population and then there's another chunk of the population that, supposedly, gluten just doesn't sit well with them - due to the inflammatory response gluten elicits in general in the body. (Which is why people link it to acne)

 

I definitely don't think Western medicine is bogus. I've been studying health sciences at uni and that covers a lot of human anatomy, physiology, human disease and pharmacology among other things. A lot of people then go on to medicine after that. So in some ways I'm weary of some alternative medicine (such as acupuncture - which I think has zero credibility/proof and that the benefit is usually in the mind / placebo). But I don't think nutritional approaches are really alternative medicine in that sense. If I went to a doctor and asked about gluten/acne I might get a 'no way' response from an older doctor, but I think chances are that a newer doctor might consider it as a possibility with developing research and consciousness of what you put in your body undoubtedly effecting your health and functioning. Nutrition itself and nutritionists are becoming are more recognised/valued and important role in health too. There's a new idea emerging (at least being talked about in the last few years) which I think is being coined as 'Green medicine' or 'The Green Prescription' - where doctors are starting to actually prescribe diet changes / eating healthy / increasing physical activity for patients (mainly exercise I think). I'm not sure of all the details on that but there is more of a change / shift happening. Different elements of health and health care are becoming more linked and integrated - which makes a lot more sense I think because that's how everything in the body is - everything is so integrated. I think diet does impact your skin - it effects every other part of the body and numerous processes in the body and that in turn can impact the skin.

 

Anyway, sorry for rambling on a bit. I'm not being 'light' on the decisions I make. I think it's worth a try to see how it goes and how I respond. 

Thanks again for taking the time to reply and for sharing your views / opinions. :)



#7 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,543
    Likes: 1,107
About Me
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:05 AM

Thank you both smile.png I'll check out the recipe thread and see what I find. I guess eggs might be an option for breakfast still, though I have a feeling they worsen my acne so I'll have to test it. I'll cut gluten starting tomorrow morning (already had a few things with gluten today....) 
 
As far as it affecting acne though - if they were related for me, would I expect to see improvements soon after cutting it or is it the sort of thing that is sort of built up in the body and takes a while to 'heal' and then see changes?
 
Either way, I'll try it for a month at least... and even if I don't see changes, I'll be limiting the amount of gluten I have.

It damages the digestive tract which might take some time to heal, there are also some foods you can consume that help it heal, such as mucilaginous or slimy foods -- okra, cactus, purslane, chia. There's more in the good things thread.

You would probably only see an immediate improvement if you have an allergy to wheat. But avoiding gluten, also means avoiding a hell of a lot of high glycemic refined carbs and some people notice a reduction in oil and inflammation very quickly.

------------

Although I might find an 'idea' or starting point on these message boards, I don't do anything health related without doing my own detailed research first or before consulting a GP. I want to know what I'm doing and understand if there's a possible connection. I advise other people to do the same  - make your own, well informed decisions - don't just do something because you read it here or some other public forum. I get what you mean about people not being qualified, and although I think a few are well researched and have a lot of personal experience to share, I still like to check things out myself and read up on things first before making a decision....
 
I've been down the BP road before, tried different types of antibiotics and countless over the counter acne products with no real success.. smile.png

 

I'd advise everyone to do their own research before blindly following a doctors advice as well.


Edited by alternativista, 11 March 2013 - 09:09 AM.


#8 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,543
    Likes: 1,107
About Me
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:34 AM

Speaking as someone who has tried for years to eliminate acne with dietary/holistic means, I realize it was a fools errand, ESPECIALLY when there are many other medically proven methods for doing so.  You should probably find a good dermatologist who doesn't rush you out the door and actually listens to you.  Or try Dan's regimen, which is really good.  Benzoyl peroxide has actually been scientifically and medically studied, and is proven to help fight acne.  Eliminating gluten can make no such claims.
 
Also, I'd be VERY wary about taking health or dietary advice from people on message boards.  Most people on these boards speak about diet, health, nutrition, supplements, and disorders, as if they are authorities or qualified to do so.  The truth is, most if any are not, and for some reason when you read a comment or two by people on boards, they have a tendency to sound authoritative and knowledgeable, even though they are not.  People on the boards tend to exaggerate, get over enthusiastic, and speak matter of factly, without the normal ability for you to discuss and converse as you would in real life. 
 
Why would you think there was a connection between gluten and acne?  If the only reason is because you read it on a message board, it's probably not very credible.  A lot of these dietary claims, when you really think about them with common sense and clarity, actually make little sense.  Ask any dermatologist, and they will tell you there is little to no connection between foods and acne.  And you know what?  The "experts" on these boards will shoot that down and explain how western medicine is bogus, etc, etc.  Now, just take a moment and really think about these claims, the qualifications of the people making these claims, and just plain common, everyday sense. 
 
The other thing that is puzzling is the idea that somehow gluten is bad for you.  Humans have been nourished by wheat and rice since the start of civilization, and still are.  If you think you have a gluten allergy, you should talk to your doctor and take their advice, NOT the advice of people on internet message boards.  Ask your doctor if acne is a symptom of a gluten allergy, and I'd be willing to bet they say "no".  But obviously, ask them for yourself.
 
It is my opinion that a lot of diet extremists look for ways to get some kind of control over aging, over health, over appearance and beauty, and so they find ridiculous scapegoats in conventional thinking, put EXTREME restrictions on themselves, all as a way to get "control" over what they perceive as health and beauty.  IMO, it's actually very similar to the way people with eating disorders think and approach things.  To rule out eating wheat, rice, rye, barely, and any other grains that have gluten, with no existing allergy, because you think it will improve your skin, is EXTREME, and nonsensical. 
 
Controlling your acne requires being pragmatic, logical, and calm.  Engaging in these ridiculous dietary quests for clear skin is none of those.  I'm sorry if I sound harsh, but I've been there, and it's a waste of time and energy, and it diverts you from the real medications/treatments out there that can actually help you.

------------------------- 
well, the parts I bolded are valid points. You made two in all of that.  Yes, Engaging in ridiculous diets is not pragmatic, logical and calm.  Engaging in actual healthy diet and lifestyle is.
 
Also, the wheat and the products we make from it since our food became so industrialized is not the same as the what we ate thousands of years ago or even 50 to 100 years ago.  Bread used to be made with very long, slow fermentation methods. Those techniques reduce the harmful antinutrients in wheat and gluten.  Also, nutrients in other foods, real foods, bind up antinutrients. And others repair the harm done by gluten.  But these days, people eat a lot less of the beneficial foods while filling up on refined grains and chicken fried meats.  gluten doesn't have a direct effect on acne. It affects acne because it affects everything going on in your body.
 
And yes, the average dermatologist will tell you diet has nothing to do with acne because that's what they were taught in med school and they've done no independent learning, not read the many, many studies that prove that it does.  But many good dermatologists and other doctors will tell you the truth. Unfortunately, most of us only have access to the average doctor. 
 
Instead of jumping from one extreme belief to the polar opposite extreme belief, why not try learning real facts and gaining real knowledge and comprehension?

Edited by alternativista, 11 March 2013 - 09:09 AM.


#9 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 754
About Me
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:06 AM

Gluten and acne are connected. In people with gluten sensitivity, negative symptoms can manifest in many different forms. Skin problems are HUGELY common. I am a member of a celiac disease support group and skin flares are one of the most common reactions from ingesting gluten, along with stomach issues and mood disturbances.



#10 EmitaWolff

EmitaWolff

    New Member

  • Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 23
    Likes: 2
About Me
  • Joined: 11-March 13

Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:52 PM

Hi Lilly75

 

I've been avoiding gluten for the last 6 months. Actually, I only eat fresh vegetables, fruit, beens, chickpeas and lentils, healthy fats, flax seed, pumpkin seeds, Fish and sometimes organic chicken and pork. I never eat sugar, dairy or wheat.

 

Speaking from my own experience, not any scientific evidences or researches, I can say that it made a huge different for me.

 

My acne is a lot better, my skin is not dull and grey as much as before, it kind of "glows" without beeing greasy.

I also take evening primrose oil, vitamin E, Niacin, vitamin C and vitamin D.

I dont feel bloated, I have more energi and my body has changes to the better.

 

IF you decide to go gluten-free, it will be diffucult in the beginning .. reading labels and planning meal takes time .. but I can strongly reccomend the hard work!

 

For snacks, I often have a little plastic box with carrots and hummus or guacamole, Peas or chickpeas with some pumpkinseeds or nuts - you can also try to make omelette with tuna or salmon, spinach and different herbs.

 

I wish you good luck.



#11 Lilly75

Lilly75

    Veteran Member

  • Moderators
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,440
    Likes: 454
About Me
  • Joined: 01-April 12

Achievements

     

Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:16 PM

Although I might find an 'idea' or starting point on these message boards, I don't do anything health related without doing my own detailed research first or before consulting a GP. I want to know what I'm doing and understand if there's a possible connection. I advise other people to do the same  - make your own, well informed decisions - don't just do something because you read it here or some other public forum. I get what you mean about people not being qualified, and although I think a few are well researched and have a lot of personal experience to share, I still like to check things out myself and read up on things first before making a decision....


I've been down the BP road before, tried different types of antibiotics and countless over the counter acne products with no real success.. smile.png

 

I'd advise everyone to do their own research before blindly following a doctors advice as well.

 

 

Yes, definitely.  I think people should be as informed as they can be - especially for understanding their health etc

 

Gluten and acne are connected. In people with gluten sensitivity, negative symptoms can manifest in many different forms. Skin problems are HUGELY common. I am a member of a celiac disease support group and skin flares are one of the most common reactions from ingesting gluten, along with stomach issues and mood disturbances.

 

Out of curiosity - in that support group have you heard of anyone having joint pain which has improved or gone away after cutting gluten? 

 

 

 

 

Hi Lilly75

 

I've been avoiding gluten for the last 6 months. Actually, I only eat fresh vegetables, fruit, beens, chickpeas and lentils, healthy fats, flax seed, pumpkin seeds, Fish and sometimes organic chicken and pork. I never eat sugar, dairy or wheat.

 

Speaking from my own experience, not any scientific evidences or researches, I can say that it made a huge different for me.

 

My acne is a lot better, my skin is not dull and grey as much as before, it kind of "glows" without beeing greasy.

I also take evening primrose oil, vitamin E, Niacin, vitamin C and vitamin D.

I dont feel bloated, I have more energi and my body has changes to the better.

 

IF you decide to go gluten-free, it will be diffucult in the beginning .. reading labels and planning meal takes time .. but I can strongly reccomend the hard work!

 

For snacks, I often have a little plastic box with carrots and hummus or guacamole, Peas or chickpeas with some pumpkinseeds or nuts - you can also try to make omelette with tuna or salmon, spinach and different herbs.

 

I wish you good luck.

 

Thanks for sharing your experience :)

You're right - it probably will be a little difficult to start off with but I started today anyway and hope to continue. I think I'll manage ok because I really want to test this out.

Good to hear going without gluten has been of benefit to you and thanks for sharing some of the snacks and foods you typically eat :)



#12 Enimrac

Enimrac

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 120
    Likes: 6
About Me
  • Joined: 17-December 04

Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:14 AM

Thanks for taking the time to respond, Enimrac.

. smile.png

 

 

No problem, I'm glad to have the conversation with other people who have been through or are going through having cronic acne. 

 

I totally respect everyone's right to approach things in any way they choose.  And if there's one single thing I can say I got out of my experience of trying to fix my acne with health, diet, and hollistic measures, is more awareness of ingredients and where they come from, and processed vs whole foods. Since I stopped linking my acne with diet, I've more or less continued to try and eat as all naturally as possible, and am way more just generally aware of health and hollistic connections, particularly when it comes to diet and exercise.

 

But I guess what it boils down to is the "notion" that acne is linked to "health".   That somehow acne means that you yourself are unhealthy.  All the things you said about new, more holistic approaches to health are valid.  But are they valid for "acne"? 

 

I have many older relatives, like 50s and 60s, all who at one point in their lives, have suffered from serious acne, and who's skin today is scarred.  Some still have blemishes, some don't.  But they have oily skin, and just the kind of skin cronic acne seems to need.  But they are all very healthy and quite fit for their ages.  To say that people with acne, or at least persistent, chronic acne, all are unhealthy or doing something wrong with their diet, I think, is not true.  And every dermatologist I've ever been to (I've been to many), have said there is no link.

 

If you think you have an allergy,  ask your doctor if you do, and find out.  They can test you.  You don't have to experiment with dieting and insisting you have some kind of health "issue" because you have acne.  Ask an actual doctor about it, who can easily test you for a gluten allergy, as well as a lot of other allergies.  And if you did have a gluten allergy, acne probably isn't a symptom.  You'd probably have other types of symptoms. 

 

Just because you have acne doesn't mean you have to detox, or that your body is in distress, or whatever.  You just have acne.  It's the kind of skin you were born with.  It's not an indication of your health, and if you really think about it, like really think about it, it's rather insulting to state that it is.  If you think you have a gluten allergy BECAUSE you have acne, it means you see acne as a symptom of a DIFFERENT HEALTH or DIET issue, or issues.  It's not the symptom of a health problem.  Doctors seem to have answered this one already, and you can save yourself a lot of time and energy, and gain greater insight and clarity, if you simply talk to your doctor about what the actual symptoms of a gluten allergy are, and then get tested.

 

And you can still explore healthy foods and exercise independently.


Edited by Enimrac, 12 March 2013 - 12:31 AM.


#13 Omnivium

Omnivium

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 560
    Likes: 70
About Me
  • Joined: 03-December 11

Achievements

     

Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:29 AM

Definitely worth a try. Grains probably cause more acne for me than any other food, and I noticed a reduction in acne when I started limiting them. Even if it doesn't help, it's still good for you, so you have nothing to lose.



#14 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,543
    Likes: 1,107
About Me
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:33 AM


Thanks for taking the time to respond, Enimrac.
. smile.png

 
 
No problem, I'm glad to have the conversation with other people who have been through or are going through having cronic acne. 
 
I totally respect everyone's right to approach things in any way they choose.  And if there's one single thing I can say I got out of my experience of trying to fix my acne with health, diet, and hollistic measures, is more awareness of ingredients and where they come from, and processed vs whole foods. Since I stopped linking my acne with diet, I've more or less continued to try and eat as all naturally as possible, and am way more just generally aware of health and hollistic connections, particularly when it comes to diet and exercise.
 
But I guess what it boils down to is the "notion" that acne is linked to "health".   That somehow acne means that you yourself are unhealthy.  All the things you said about new, more holistic approaches to health are valid.  But are they valid for "acne"? 
 
I have many older relatives, like 50s and 60s, all who at one point in their lives, have suffered from serious acne, and who's skin today is scarred.  Some still have blemishes, some don't.  But they have oily skin, and just the kind of skin cronic acne seems to need.  But they are all very healthy and quite fit for their ages.  To say that people with acne, or at least persistent, chronic acne, all are unhealthy or doing something wrong with their diet, I think, is not true.  And every dermatologist I've ever been to (I've been to many), have said there is no link.
 
If you think you have an allergy,  ask your doctor if you do, and find out.  They can test you.  You don't have to experiment with dieting and insisting you have some kind of health "issue" because you have acne.  Ask an actual doctor about it, who can easily test you for a gluten allergy, as well as a lot of other allergies.  And if you did have a gluten allergy, acne probably isn't a symptom.  You'd probably have other types of symptoms. 
 
Just because you have acne doesn't mean you have to detox, or that your body is in distress, or whatever.  You just have acne.  It's the kind of skin you were born with.  It's not an indication of your health, and if you really think about it, like really think about it, it's rather insulting to state that it is.  If you think you have a gluten allergy BECAUSE you have acne, it means you see acne as a symptom of a DIFFERENT HEALTH or DIET issue, or issues.  It's not the symptom of a health problem.  Doctors seem to have answered this one already, and you can save yourself a lot of time and energy, and gain greater insight and clarity, if you simply talk to your doctor about what the actual symptoms of a gluten allergy are, and then get tested.
 
And you can still explore healthy foods and exercise independently.

Ok, you brought up one valid point there. acne doesn't mean you are unhealthy. At least not any more so than anyone else treating their body the same way. But acne is very much affected by the unhealthy things you do that are also leading you on the path to all the metabolic syndrome diseases that are now the fastest growing diseases in history which is saying a lot as they are not communicable.

Acne is a symptom of chronic sub clinical inflammation. The same inflammation that is at the root of those metabolic diseases. That inflammation can come from food intolerances, high glycemic meal habits, stress, lack of sleep, visceral fat, and so on. Acne is also exacerbated by your sebum. Sebum that is stimulated by androgens tat are stimulated by insulin whose release is triggered by diet. The composition of that sebum is also affected by what you eat. How your skin cels exfoliate freely without clogging pores is also affected by diet habits such as High glycemic meal habits.

On the other hand, many acne sufferers are unhealthy. But not all. Others are just doing unhealthy things and can quickly turn it all around.

#15 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 754
About Me
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 12 March 2013 - 10:50 AM

Yeah, people have definitely had reduction in joint pain from going off gluten. Anything that reduces your inflammation will help things like that. But if you actually have an intolerance, it will help your body greatly in every way.



#16 Lilly75

Lilly75

    Veteran Member

  • Moderators
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,440
    Likes: 454
About Me
  • Joined: 01-April 12

Achievements

     

Posted 13 March 2013 - 01:31 AM

Thanks for taking the time to respond, Enimrac.

. smile.png

 

 

No problem, I'm glad to have the conversation with other people who have been through or are going through having cronic acne. 

 

I totally respect everyone's right to approach things in any way they choose.  And if there's one single thing I can say I got out of my experience of trying to fix my acne with health, diet, and hollistic measures, is more awareness of ingredients and where they come from, and processed vs whole foods. Since I stopped linking my acne with diet, I've more or less continued to try and eat as all naturally as possible, and am way more just generally aware of health and hollistic connections, particularly when it comes to diet and exercise.

 

But I guess what it boils down to is the "notion" that acne is linked to "health".   That somehow acne means that you yourself are unhealthy.  All the things you said about new, more holistic approaches to health are valid.  But are they valid for "acne"? 

 

I have many older relatives, like 50s and 60s, all who at one point in their lives, have suffered from serious acne, and who's skin today is scarred.  Some still have blemishes, some don't.  But they have oily skin, and just the kind of skin cronic acne seems to need.  But they are all very healthy and quite fit for their ages.  To say that people with acne, or at least persistent, chronic acne, all are unhealthy or doing something wrong with their diet, I think, is not true.  And every dermatologist I've ever been to (I've been to many), have said there is no link.

 

If you think you have an allergy,  ask your doctor if you do, and find out.  They can test you.  You don't have to experiment with dieting and insisting you have some kind of health "issue" because you have acne.  Ask an actual doctor about it, who can easily test you for a gluten allergy, as well as a lot of other allergies.  And if you did have a gluten allergy, acne probably isn't a symptom.  You'd probably have other types of symptoms. 

 

Just because you have acne doesn't mean you have to detox, or that your body is in distress, or whatever.  You just have acne.  It's the kind of skin you were born with.  It's not an indication of your health, and if you really think about it, like really think about it, it's rather insulting to state that it is.  If you think you have a gluten allergy BECAUSE you have acne, it means you see acne as a symptom of a DIFFERENT HEALTH or DIET issue, or issues.  It's not the symptom of a health problem.  Doctors seem to have answered this one already, and you can save yourself a lot of time and energy, and gain greater insight and clarity, if you simply talk to your doctor about what the actual symptoms of a gluten allergy are, and then get tested.

 

And you can still explore healthy foods and exercise independently.

 

I like the point you made about acne and being healthy and you're right - I don't think having acne means a person is unhealthy. I don't think acne is an indication of your health. I think it's more indicative of something going on in your body. You can't have acne for no reason. Something is happening that is making you break out. I think what you eat does effect your body, whether it be through creating a more inflamed state or impacting blood sugar levels and/or hormones - and having those things or having them 'out of balance' or fluctuating might then manifest as acne. 

 

But I don't think I'm wasting my time going gluten free. (In a way I think I'd be more likely to be wasting my time and money by going to doctors / having tests done. And I think once talking about it with a doc and describing symptoms, they'd suggest eliminating gluten for a while to see if things improve anyway). I'm not losing any time but choosing to avoid gluten. I'm not doing anything dangerous to my health by not eating it (i.e. it's not a vital nutrient etc). Like you said about when you tried out diet for your acne, it made you more conscious about ingredients etc  - and if that's all I get out of doing this then I'll be thankful for that too. I'll be less likely to eat a heap of the processed foods out there which is a good thing. I also think I have quite a few of the general symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity. So even if it doesn't effect my acne, I'll be interested to see if it helps with anything else.  I don't think there is any harm in trying it anyway. 

 

I do appreciate your opinion, responses and 'concern' (for lack of a better word) - I'm not just dismissing them at all. I just don't think I'll be wasting my time or harming myself etc by trying this out.

 

 

 

 

Yeah, people have definitely had reduction in joint pain from going off gluten. Anything that reduces your inflammation will help things like that. But if you actually have an intolerance, it will help your body greatly in every way.

Thanks :) That's good to know. It's something that bothers me even if I haven't been stressing particular joints so I'l be interested to see if cutting gluten will help at all.