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Going Dairy And Gluten Free...


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#1 NuclearSoda

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:26 PM

Hey all,

 

I decided to try cutting out milk and gluten from my diet, as I've heard other people have had great success with this method. I'm finding it extremely restrictive at the moment, but if it ends up working for me it's something I can live with.

 

I just wondered if anyone here has tried this method and had any success with it? Or could anyone recommend some snacks or alternative versions of milk or gluten foods?

 

Just to give a basic idea of my diet, I eat a lot of plain oatmeal (with water instead of milk) usually mixed with ground ginger or cinnamon. 

 

I eat meats such as pork chops, lamb, turkey, chicken, etc every night with a serving of mixed vegetables.

 

I drink just water.

 

I occasionally eat a little dark chocolate, as I've heard this can actually be good for your skin as long as it's above 70% cocoa solids.



#2 ChelleNova

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:00 AM

I'm lactose intolerant, so I rarely eat dairy. I do love ice cream though on occasion. I had to cut out wheat and gluten and have found it near impossible sometimes when hanging out with friends. I eat a lot of veggies, I love veggies. I drink aloe juice, coconut water, flax milk, and lots of tea and water. I love bread and pasta, but I found gluten free options, you can order them from amazon mostly. Instead of flour, I use garbanzo flour. I love curry over rice with tons of steamed veggies. I can't digest meat very well, so I don't eat a lot. I rarely eat meat. When my boyfriend's dad goes hunting, he'll bring back an elk and gives my dogs the bones. I have discovered that wild elk that never feeds on corn is easier to digest for me. I love chips with gaucamole, Juanitas is gluten free. There are awesome cream cheese options as well that taste just like the real thing (I was very sceptical at first). I personally don't care for dairy free cheese. Since processed cheese doesn't have lactose in it, only the enzymes which some people are sensitive to instead of lactose, I can eat small amounts of it. For ice cream you can try soy dream (I love the mint chocolate chip) or coconut milk versions. Serbet is a popular choice, not for me because of how sweet it is, but a lot of people like it. I stear clear of artificial sweeteners because they block the signal from your stomache to your brain and can cause you to eat more than you intended. They also confuse your liver and kidneys and cause your body to think it needs to store fat. I personally never liked their taste, they are gross and don't taste like real sugar in the slightest. They are made from a plant that is toxic, so they are not for me. Bread and pasta have the most drastic change when taking out gluten, but not all brands are bad. I suggest going to a restaurant that serves gluten free pasta and if you like it ask for the brand of it. Rice is also a good option, I like brown rice but will eat white rice sparingly with my curry. I hope this helps some.



#3 alternativista

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:35 AM

You have a serving of vegetables. One? That's it for plant foods besides oats? Also, what kind of oats.

#4 NuclearSoda

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:49 PM

You have a serving of vegetables. One? That's it for plant foods besides oats? Also, what kind of oats.

Yeah, although recently I have been having a hot lunch with another serving of mixed vegetables also, which includes broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and green beans.

 

The oats are wholegrain rolled oats, by Quaker Oats. 



#5 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:19 PM

Those oats have gluten in them. Just thought you would want to know. If you're going to cut gluten, you have to cut ALL gluten, otherwise your experiment is useless. Keep in mind that many things are not gluten free and it doesn't list wheat on the package.



#6 NuclearSoda

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:15 PM

Those oats have gluten in them. Just thought you would want to know. If you're going to cut gluten, you have to cut ALL gluten, otherwise your experiment is useless. Keep in mind that many things are not gluten free and it doesn't list wheat on the package.

 

Ah, I was afraid someone was going to say that. I'm stumped to be honest. I had a very restricted diet BEFORE cutting out gluten and dairy (bad childhood habits) so finding safe foods to fill the void is really hard. That oatmeal was my go to snack for whenever I was feeling tempted to forget the diet and just eat everything in sight, but now I guess I'll have to find another snack to replace it. 

 

This is hard :(



#7 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:43 PM

Yeah, it seems hard in the beginning, but then you get used to it. I've been 100% gluten free since 2007, corn, soy and dairy free since 2009 and grain free since 2010. I had one short stint recently of trying dairy again but it broke me out so terribly that I decided it wasn't worth it. I'm thinking of trying some grains again soon too but not sure.

 

Some oats are gluten free, just not the ones you have. I believe Bob's Red Mill makes a gluten free version.



#8 WishClean

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 12:57 AM

Based on my experience, all kinds of oats - including gluten free oatmeal - broke me out, especially if I would have more than 1/2 bowl for breakfast. Going gluten free was a difficult transition for me but I got used to it. Unfortunately, my skin got used to it too and started breaking out again a few months into it. Now I have cut out some gluten free things, such as GF ice cream and fruit because you can consume high quantities of sugar and still be GF. 

I would recommend replacing oatmeal with omelet in the morning unless you are allergic to eggs.

Flax milk is a great and tasty alternative to milk, and is also GF and contains many useful nutrients.

Lavash bread made from millet and flaxseed is also GF (or may contain only small traces of gluten - check the ingredients because there are different kinds).  Basically, if you go to a health foods store you will have no trouble finding plenty of GF foods and snacks....just be aware of the sugar content.


Edited by WishClean, 03 March 2013 - 12:58 AM.


#9 alternativista

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 08:19 AM

Yeah, it seems hard in the beginning, but then you get used to it. I've been 100% gluten free since 2007, corn, soy and dairy free since 2009 and grain free since 2010. I had one short stint recently of trying dairy again but it broke me out so terribly that I decided it wasn't worth it. I'm thinking of trying some grains again soon too but not sure.
 
Some oats are gluten free, just not the ones you have. I believe Bob's Red Mill makes a gluten free version.


What form of dairy did you try? I'm actively trying to have a bit if goat cheese regularly as goat dairy is very high in a precursor to an anti aging nutrient people supplement. I cant think which at the moment. Alpha lipoic acid I think. I'm not saying its essential to anyone, but there are reasons why some fermented dairy can be a good idea in the diet. That's just one.

#10 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 09:53 AM

Yeah, it seems hard in the beginning, but then you get used to it. I've been 100% gluten free since 2007, corn, soy and dairy free since 2009 and grain free since 2010. I had one short stint recently of trying dairy again but it broke me out so terribly that I decided it wasn't worth it. I'm thinking of trying some grains again soon too but not sure.
 
Some oats are gluten free, just not the ones you have. I believe Bob's Red Mill makes a gluten free version.


What form of dairy did you try? I'm actively trying to have a bit if goat cheese regularly as goat dairy is very high in a precursor to an anti aging nutrient people supplement. I cant think which at the moment. Alpha lipoic acid I think. I'm not saying its essential to anyone, but there are reasons why some fermented dairy can be a good idea in the diet. That's just one.

 

 

I tried organic fermented goat milk kefir and organic greek yogurt. The kefir broke me out pretty bad but the greek yogurt caused massive, fluid-filled cysts that were worse than most of the normal acne I get. It's been a while since I stopped eating dairy and the last of the cysts are still in the process of healing.



#11 alternativista

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:17 AM


Yeah, it seems hard in the beginning, but then you get used to it. I've been 100% gluten free since 2007, corn, soy and dairy free since 2009 and grain free since 2010. I had one short stint recently of trying dairy again but it broke me out so terribly that I decided it wasn't worth it. I'm thinking of trying some grains again soon too but not sure.
 
Some oats are gluten free, just not the ones you have. I believe Bob's Red Mill makes a gluten free version.

What form of dairy did you try? I'm actively trying to have a bit if goat cheese regularly as goat dairy is very high in a precursor to an anti aging nutrient people supplement. I cant think which at the moment. Alpha lipoic acid I think. I'm not saying its essential to anyone, but there are reasons why some fermented dairy can be a good idea in the diet. That's just one.
 
 
I tried organic fermented goat milk kefir and organic greek yogurt. The kefir broke me out pretty bad but the greek yogurt caused massive, fluid-filled cysts that were worse than most of the normal acne I get. It's been a while since I stopped eating dairy and the last of the cysts are still in the process of healing.

Wow. I doubt there's anything more tolerable than organic goat kefir.

#12 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:26 AM

Yeah I know. My friend is in the same situation with his health and his doctor told him that there is only a microscopic percentage of people on Earth who have a bad reaction to goat milk. Apparently, I'm one of them. My friend could handle the goat milk just fine.

 

Life is just so awesome and fair. I love it.


Edited by dejaclairevoyant, 03 March 2013 - 10:26 AM.


#13 kaleidoscope

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 12:48 AM

Yeah I know. My friend is in the same situation with his health and his doctor told him that there is only a microscopic percentage of people on Earth who have a bad reaction to goat milk. Apparently, I'm one of them. My friend could handle the goat milk just fine.

 

Life is just so awesome and fair. I love it.

 

 

I think that doctor is wrong. I read a study on the cross-reactivity between cow's and goat's milk, and I think, if I remember correctly, they found that about 75% of the people allergic to cow's milk were also allergic to goat's. And cow's milk is one of the most common allergens out there, and allergies are pretty darn common these days.

 

I did tolerate homemade SCD goat's milk yogurt for awhile, several years ago, but it wasn't long before I became allergic to it (I've always been allergic to cow's milk).

 

Also, I think the yeast in kefir makes it less likely to be tolerated than yogurt.


Edited by kaleidoscope, 10 March 2013 - 12:50 AM.


#14 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 11:12 AM

Yeah I know. My friend is in the same situation with his health and his doctor told him that there is only a microscopic percentage of people on Earth who have a bad reaction to goat milk. Apparently, I'm one of them. My friend could handle the goat milk just fine.

 

Life is just so awesome and fair. I love it.

 

 

I think that doctor is wrong. I read a study on the cross-reactivity between cow's and goat's milk, and I think, if I remember correctly, they found that about 75% of the people allergic to cow's milk were also allergic to goat's. And cow's milk is one of the most common allergens out there, and allergies are pretty darn common these days.

 

I did tolerate homemade SCD goat's milk yogurt for awhile, several years ago, but it wasn't long before I became allergic to it (I've always been allergic to cow's milk).

 

Also, I think the yeast in kefir makes it less likely to be tolerated than yogurt.

 

Thanks for sharing. I thought I was the only person on Earth who couldn't tolerate it. People are always like "everyone can tolerate goat milk!" and it makes me mad because it just isn't true.



#15 darkheart

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:34 PM

Those oats have gluten in them. Just thought you would want to know. If you're going to cut gluten, you have to cut ALL gluten, otherwise your experiment is useless. Keep in mind that many things are not gluten free and it doesn't list wheat on the package.

 

Ah, I was afraid someone was going to say that. I'm stumped to be honest. I had a very restricted diet BEFORE cutting out gluten and dairy (bad childhood habits) so finding safe foods to fill the void is really hard. That oatmeal was my go to snack for whenever I was feeling tempted to forget the diet and just eat everything in sight, but now I guess I'll have to find another snack to replace it. 

 

This is hard sad.png

 

 

True oatmeal is formulated without gluten. Maybe try getting it from a place like Wholefoods or something or in raw form.

 

I've done the gluten, dairy and casein free diet for many years without any improvement from acne. I only suggest doing this diet for around 3-6 months and if you don't see any results then honestly just go back to eating regular food without any of this rigidity. Don't forget that Dairy sensitivity is the cause of acne in only a small number of people and for most this is not the issue. Keep that in mind.