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Experiences With Oily Skin And Diet?

oily skin

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#1 paigems

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:29 PM

I have extremely oily skin and mostly noninflamed acne. I also have PCOS, and I'd really like to change my diet to help with these issues. Problem is I have a meal plan at school and no kitchen or car. So I've decided to really commit to the new diet in 2 months when I'm done with school. Mostly I am just looking for people's experiences with reducing their oily skin through diet. I guess I would like to be reassured that it can get better since having oily skin is so uncomfortable.



#2 peacelovefood

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:17 PM

My skin seems to have a mind of it's own. However, I do know that when I eat healthy and cut out overly processed junk (cookies, chips, other junk food) my skin gets less oily. What helps the oil more, and this is crazy, but using an oil control moisturizer. I recommend Cetaphil's oil control moisturizer to EVERYONE because I love it so much. When I don't use it, my skin is more oily than when I do. 

When our skin gets dry, it starts to produce its own oil, which is that gross oil you are trying to get rid of. But when you add a moisturizer, your skin does not have to work so hard to produce oil and it actually balances it out. 

I'm sure you know all of this, you've been on this site for a while, as have I, just undercover. I just made an account, well, I made one a few years ago but I lost the password so I just started a new one lol. 

 

Eating more produce definitely helps though in oil control. That's all I've got. 

 

Hope you find your answers.



#3 Omnivium

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:24 AM

When our skin gets dry, it starts to produce its own oil, which is that gross oil you are trying to get rid of. But when you add a moisturizer, your skin does not have to work so hard to produce oil and it actually balances it out. 

 

You obviously haven't been reading Bryan's posts lol. Your body doesn't respond to dry skin by producing more oil. If it did, people would have oily elbows and knuckles etc. Skin doesn't need sebum at all. There are no sebaceous glands in the palms of your hands, yet the skin on your palms is some of the nicest, toughest skin on your body. And I've never seen anyone with dry palms.

 

Moisturizer does not reduce oil production. Moisturizer has no effect on androgens binding to the sebaceous glands.



To answer the OP, a low glycemic load diet to reduce blood sugar spikes is the only diet I know of that could reduce some peoples' oil. Avoiding dairy is also a good idea because of all the hormones in it, but I don't think that would actually reduce the oil. I tried low glycemic load and very low carb, and neither improved my oil at all. Healthy diet and supplements have reduced my inflammation by about 80%, but they do nothing for my oil. I've resorted to low dose accutane for the oil, and it has decreased the oil by about half so far.



#4 paigems

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 01:15 PM

To answer the OP, a low glycemic load diet to reduce blood sugar spikes is the only diet I know of that could reduce some peoples' oil. Avoiding dairy is also a good idea because of all the hormones in it, but I don't think that would actually reduce the oil. I tried low glycemic load and very low carb, and neither improved my oil at all. Healthy diet and supplements have reduced my inflammation by about 80%, but they do nothing for my oil. I've resorted to low dose accutane for the oil, and it has decreased the oil by about half so far.

It's discouraging to hear that diet didn't help your oily skin. I've also taken accutane and the oil came back after 2 years. This time around, though, I wanted to try something more natural to help with it. I wonder why diet helps some people's oily skin and doesn't help others.



#5 TatianaD

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:08 AM

I have extremely oily skin and mostly noninflamed acne. I also have PCOS, and I'd really like to change my diet to help with these issues. Problem is I have a meal plan at school and no kitchen or car. So I've decided to really commit to the new diet in 2 months when I'm done with school. Mostly I am just looking for people's experiences with reducing their oily skin through diet. I guess I would like to be reassured that it can get better since having oily skin is so uncomfortable.

 

I have combination skin and have been following a healthier low carb no sugar diet for months now without any effect on my oil production. It has however, in combination with taking a multi, probiotics and fish oil, given me less acne, sped up my healing process (hyperpigmentation) and made my skin look healthier overall smile.png .

 

I do have a question though. Although I am taking a multivitamin should I take zinc supplements?



#6 alternativista

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:39 AM

A lot of wrong inf in above posts. Sebum is not dead grease sitting on the surface any more than your intestines are pipes. Your intestines are made up of living cells that do things. And so does your sebum. See the linoleic acis thread for more info.

Now, to reduce oily skin, follow diet habits that reduce igf1 and DHT production. Avoid or limit high glycemic meals, drinks and snacks and dairy. And consume nutrients that block or regulate DHT and androgen production such as zinc.

But in short, eat real, whole nutrient dense foods in low to moderate glycemic load meals, drinks and snacks.


I have extremely oily skin and mostly noninflamed acne. I also have PCOS, and I'd really like to change my diet to help with these issues. Problem is I have a meal plan at school and no kitchen or car. So I've decided to really commit to the new diet in 2 months when I'm done with school. Mostly I am just looking for people's experiences with reducing their oily skin through diet. I guess I would like to be reassured that it can get better since having oily skin is so uncomfortable.

 
I have combination skin and have been following a healthier low carb no sugar diet for months now without any effect on my oil production. It has however, in combination with taking a multi, probiotics and fish oil, given me less acne, sped up my healing process (hyperpigmentation) and made my skin look healthier overall smile.png .
 
I do have a question though. Although I am taking a multivitamin should I take zinc supplements?

What mult? If its a one a day, its most likely useless. Water soluble vitamins are needed throughout the day and the body has limits of how much of many minerals and fat soluble nutrients it can take in at once. Look into something like natures way alive.




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