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Are These Foods 'bad' For You?


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#1 Jekester

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:16 PM

White Potatoes (I can't have Sweet Potatoes) and Capsicum? I don't really have to much potato, every now and then maybe, same goes with Capsicum. I know White Potatoes can rise blood sugar levels and what not, but for Capsicum apparently it's part of a nightshade family? which isn't good?


Edited by Jekester, 28 January 2013 - 06:23 PM.


#2 o Havoc o

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:40 AM

White Potatoes (I can't have Sweet Potatoes) and Capsicum? I don't really have to much potato, every now and then maybe, same goes with Capsicum. I know White Potatoes can rise blood sugar levels and what not, but for Capsicum apparently it's part of a nightshade family? which isn't good?

 

Dude you keep asking questions that are difficult to answer. The reason for this is that nutrition is an individual thing. For example i have not issues with sweet potatoes where as you do.

 

White potatoes are more starchy so for weight management probably not ideal in large amounts. However eating them eat a lean source of protein and essential fats will decrease the GI response on your body.

 

Fact is, it is trial an error. Add it to your diet and see if you break out. If you do then take it away.

 

Capsicum is found in peppers. Peppers are good staple of my nutrition, but again just because i have no issues with them doesn't mean the same for everyone.

 

You need to find out for yourself. Apply some common sense, stick to nutrient dense foods and play around with them. Most people here had to do a lot of trial and error to find what is right for them.



#3 alternativista

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 09:57 AM

The glycemic impact of the potato can vary with how it's prepared, whether it was cooked and allowed to cool, reheated, etc.  Also, what matters is the impact of the meal, so it depends on what else you eat it with.   But it certainly isn't a nutrient dense food no matter how you cook it. 



#4 Jekester

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

Thanks for the answers, and it's mainly just for taste + some carbs. It's usually either boiled or in an oven and I'd only eat about half of it. I'll see how I go with it.



#5 o Havoc o

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 03:10 AM

The glycemic impact of the potato can vary with how it's prepared, whether it was cooked and allowed to cool, reheated, etc.  Also, what matters is the impact of the meal, so it depends on what else you eat it with.   But it certainly isn't a nutrient dense food no matter how you cook it. 

 

The problem i have with the GI scale is that it goes out the window if consumed with fibre, protein and fats. This being the case the GI scale is next to useless as this scale was made on fasted people only eating 1 carb source at a time.



#6 alternativista

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 07:31 AM


The glycemic impact of the potato can vary with how it's prepared, whether it was cooked and allowed to cool, reheated, etc.  Also, what matters is the impact of the meal, so it depends on what else you eat it with.   But it certainly isn't a nutrient dense food no matter how you cook it. 

 
The problem i have with the GI scale is that it goes out the window if consumed with fibre, protein and fats..

Which is what I said.

#7 tweaker123

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:17 PM

The glycemic impact of the potato can vary with how it's prepared, whether it was cooked and allowed to cool, reheated, etc.  Also, what matters is the impact of the meal, so it depends on what else you eat it with.   But it certainly isn't a nutrient dense food no matter how you cook it. 

 

The problem i have with the GI scale is that it goes out the window if consumed with fibre, protein and fats. This being the case the GI scale is next to useless as this scale was made on fasted people only eating 1 carb source at a time.

So what youre saying is, if i ate the same amount of protein,fat, and fiber , and the same amount of  carb source being a high glycemic index food such as white bread, my insulin wouldnt spike as much as if i ate the same amount of low glycemic carbs such as brown basmati rice?



#8 o Havoc o

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:46 AM

 

The glycemic impact of the potato can vary with how it's prepared, whether it was cooked and allowed to cool, reheated, etc.  Also, what matters is the impact of the meal, so it depends on what else you eat it with.   But it certainly isn't a nutrient dense food no matter how you cook it. 

 

The problem i have with the GI scale is that it goes out the window if consumed with fibre, protein and fats. This being the case the GI scale is next to useless as this scale was made on fasted people only eating 1 carb source at a time.

So what youre saying is, if i ate the same amount of protein,fat, and fiber , and the same amount of  carb source being a high glycemic index food such as white bread, my insulin wouldnt spike as much as if i ate the same amount of low glycemic carbs such as brown basmati rice?

 

 

Essentially yes however i wouldn't advocate white bread as it is loaded with a lot of crap in it.

 

The GI index was made by feeding a fasted individual a specific carb and then measuring the glucose response. Nothing else in their system, just that one carb source after fasting.

 

Now add in a mixed meal of protein, fats and i would argue that fiber is a bigger factor here. This slow down the rate of digestion and insulin response.

 

This is not to say, just go and eat whatever. Lower GI foods are typically more nutrient dense. The only time you need to worry about GI, assuming you monitor GI is if you have not eaten anything previously that day, if that carb source is being consumed by itself.

 

When i guide people through weight management my key focus is sufficient  protein, fats and fiber. Fiber is hugely overlooked but it is a key aspect of health and weight management.



#9 Morton125

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:12 AM

I like sweet potatoes becuase these are good in taste and vergy effective for the muscles health.

I don't like Capsicum more, I use it sometimes in pizza, or in vegetables fried rice.