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Vitamin Deficiencies That Affect Acne?

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I'm curious what vitamin deficiencies can affect acne, or even what vitamins some people BELIEVE affects their acne even if told otherwise from doctors?

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All of them, really. But zinc, c, D, magnesium, omega 3 efas, beta carotene...

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It's true, all of them. But I had a severe D deficiency that I started correcting the beginning of January, and the hundreds of bumps and red marks are almost all gone now. If you're skin's better during the summer, you probably are deficient in D.

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VITAMIN D!

Why? Because it's not really a vitamin but a pro-hormone and acne is result of a hormonal imbalance.

All the others are just vitamins. They can all help various areas of general health, but do not have the gene expression/regulation that a hormone like vitatmin D does.. Please do research on Vitamin D; it has done amazing things to my skin that no other vitamin, let alone prescription, has been able to do.

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I'm curious what vitamin deficiencies can affect acne, or even what vitamins some people BELIEVE affects their acne even if told otherwise from doctors?

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I only take a standard multivitamin right now, and had my doctor check my vitamin/mineral levels, so I'll find out tomorrow the results of those. I don't eat junk or dairy, almost no grains. My skin is much better in the summer, I had no acne till decemeber came then all of a sudden all my pores are clogged, then started breaking out so I'm sure I'm deficient in quite a few things...

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melme87 - I'd be willing to bet, especially based on what you have described, that you are Vitamin D deficient. If you cut out dairy (i.e. Vitamin D fortified milk or yogurt) you are cutting out one of the very few dietary sources of Vitamin D. And living in Michigan, your skin hasn't produced Vitamin D since October at the latest. Discuss with your doctor supplementing with Vitamin D. Living in the northern latitudes you will need to do this anyway for prevention of all sorts of diseases and for optimal health, in addition to helping your skin.

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melme87 - I'd be willing to bet, especially based on what you have described, that you are Vitamin D deficient. If you cut out dairy (i.e. Vitamin D fortified milk or yogurt) you are cutting out one of the very few dietary sources of Vitamin D. And living in Michigan, your skin hasn't produced Vitamin D since October at the latest. Discuss with your doctor supplementing with Vitamin D. Living in the northern latitudes you will need to do this anyway for prevention of all sorts of diseases and for optimal health, in addition to helping your skin.

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What if your face gets even worse than it already is in the summer could you have too much vitamin D. Cause I'm taking D and don't know if I should take it in the summer since I work outside.

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What if your face gets even worse than it already is in the summer could you have too much vitamin D. Cause I'm taking D and don't know if I should take it in the summer since I work outside.

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yes melmel87. It couldn't hurt to boost your levels higher. Some researchers think the optimal range is in the 50-70 range or even higher but like everything this is disputed what level is need for optimal health versus merely sufficient levels. I read somewhere life guards that are out in the sun all day have average readings around 110-120 and they show no ill side effects.

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There's some evidence to show that people with inflammatory acne have significantly lower levels of antioxidant vitamins and minerals. Most likely this is because of acne - rather than the cause of acne.
There's also evidence that supplementing with antioxidants can help, especially zinc but also with an antioxidant blend that contains vitamin B3, C and E.

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Vitamin D is good for the skin health and fight against the acne.

You should take proper amount of the vitamin D to cure from the acne.

You can take vitamin D from sun shine, fish, milk, and yogurt.

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