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Vitamin D Has Cured Me Of Oily Skin And Acne

vitamin b vitamin a fish oil oily skin

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#41 Jekester

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 11:35 PM

Thanks :). It's summer here (Australia). 



#42 Spotthedifference

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:59 AM

Vitamin D supplementation has greatly reduced my oil production. I also just want to make a bit of a defence for zinc - I take 50mg about once a week and there's 15mg in my daily multivitamin. It increases my skin healing times and doesn't seem to increase the amount of sebum on my skin. I'm female but I have high levels of testosterone anyway, don't know if that makes any difference or not.



#43 SebumSucks

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 06:03 PM

Jekester - It appears then that your Cod LIver Oil is providing all the Vitamin D you need.  If you have oily skin then the Cod LIver oil is probably exacerbating that.  If I consume larger than normal amounts of oil/fats in my diet (via food or supplements) I get more oil production.  Now CLO is supposed to be a beneficial, non-inflammatory type oil but you might want to consider dropping it if you feel you are not getting much result from it.  I have tried it before, in addition to straight fish oil, and then purified DHA/EHA, none providing much success. At times I do think I experienced less inflammation while on these oils, but never did I experience a decrease in oil or level of clearance that I am getting with straight dry tablet vitamin D supplements. 



#44 brightling

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:41 PM

I want also to say something about zinc supplementaion. I know many people say it's good for skin etc. Topicaly maybe it helps me a bit, but supplementing with zinc makes my acne worse along with more sebum production. It has to be hormonal related, raising testosterone and dht.
 
 


Oh yeah, i dont think you're alone there. I find it ironic that zinc and b vitamins are always touted as acne cures. Zinc supplements can cause or worsen acne and oily skin in some because most of the zinc supplements usually come with a massive dose of B6. Excessive amounts of vitamins B6 and B12 are known to cause or worsen acne and oily skin in some people; take a B complex if you don't believe me. Besides that, too much zinc suppresses your immune system and whats too much for me might be too little for you so you just never know. In my experience, taking too much of any one vitamin just makes my skin worse. I think its probably because it upsets the balance of everything even more.

I love D3 and the idea of it being a "prohormone," instead of a vitamin but meh, i'm stuck with this giant bottle of D3 1000IU so i only take it every other day and i always feel like I have to take magnesium b/c of it which just annoys me (ugh, too many vitamins). But have any of you guys tried using D3 topically? I have this Ocean Potion "anti-aging" SPF with D3 and I swear to god it totally makes my skin all healthy and supple. I know that sounds lame cause its just a cheap sunscreen but its the only thing I've changed--plus I'm on accutane, so my skin was looking pretty rough before i started using it, (or okay, it was looking like absolute crap). Anyways, I looked up topical D3 when I realized the SPF could be doing good things for my skin and I found some article that was touting it as a miracle ingredient for a facial cream or something. I can't find it anymore so now i'm wondering if anyone else knows anything about this? I just ordered a D3 moisturizer with something like 10,000 IU of D3 but now I wonder if that means I will have to stop taking it orally...I prolly don't need to be getting toxic levels of both D and A but lol, I guess its better to be balanced right?

#45 Omnivium

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:54 AM

A lot of good info in the op. I'll try to add to it. Here's a quote from this article.

 

"The biological function of sebocytes is further regulated by several factors including ligands of receptors expressed in sebocytes, such as androgens and estrogens, PPAR ligands and neuropeptides (NP), liver-X receptor ligands (LXR), histamines, retinoids and vitamin D. The ligand-receptor complexes activate pathways involving cell proliferation, differentiation, lipogenesis, hormone metabolism and cytokine and chemokine release."

 

Sebocytes are cells that make up the sebaceous glands. Ligands are signal-triggering molecules that bind to receptors(in this case, sebocyte receptors). It says "such as", so this may not be all of them, but it lists the main ligands, or things that bind to sebocyte receptors: androgens, estrogens, PPAR ligands and neuropeptides, liver-X receptor ligands, histamines, retinoids, and vitamin D. I don't know what all of those are, but the ones that stuck out for me were androgens, retinoids, and vitamin D. Androgens trigger the sebaceous glands to produce sebum. Accutane is a retinoid that triggers the glands to stop producing sebum. Vitamin D could also trigger the glands to stop producing sebum(although I have not experienced this personally). The op hypothesized that vitamin D and Accutane could trigger the sebaceous glands to stop producing sebum, but maybe they just bind to the receptors and block androgens, therefore blocking the triggers that cause sebum production. Or maybe they do trigger the sebaceous glands to stop producing sebum BY blocking androgens.

 

I think we're on to something, although I've thought that many times before. Still, I think we should study this more and try using vitamin D if we can. I would try it again, but I'm already taking Accutane.



#46 drewfish01

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 01:19 AM

Okay i would like those who tried vitamin d3 and tell me if they took the tablet or the softgel form?  And also if anyone of you took d3 which had soybean oil?  If so, did that work or not work?

 

 

I noticed that nature bounty gel has soybean oil and so does nature made liquid softgel.  So if you get nature made in TABLET FORM... it doesn't have soybean.  Do you think that would be better?

 

 

Its strange b/c i read so many ppl say they like gel form b/c its easy to swallow as oppose to tablets which are big but those tablets dont have soybean oil...

 

 

Im curious if the soybean oil makes a difference from ppl who taken vitamin d.



#47 itsoveryes

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:12 AM

Any acne studies done by race? If this is true darker skin people should have higher rates of acne (controlllled by longitude) than lighter skin people because of the increased difficulty in absorbing sunlight due to higher melatonin concentrations.

#48 drewfish01

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:57 AM

Did you guys take vitamin d3 twice a day or just once a day?  Do you take it with meals or it doesn't matter?  



#49 prizon

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:24 AM

I take vitamin D3 with meal for better absorption.



#50 Diefenbaker3

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

Hey guys,

 

Just looking into adding some D3 supplements to my diet (especially as we're having a particularly cold winter here in the UK!)

 

I ordered a some 5000 IU capsules online yesterday, so before they come I went into Holland and Barrett (a vitamin/health store in the UK) and the biggest size tablets they do are 1000 IU!!! The lady in there told me that this is because of government health advice and that I shouldn't take more than 1 a day without consulting my doctor for a Vitamin D test!

 

After reading a lot online, including this post, it appears most recent research indicates this may be a load of rubbish and we actually need a lot more than some people think!



#51 Diefenbaker3

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:26 PM

FWIW these are the ones I bought

http://www.hollandan...did=886&cid=163

 

Crazy the lady was telling me no more than one pill a day when some of you are on 5x that?!



#52 littlebear86

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 10:32 AM

Hi Diefenbaker3,

 

I also bought the same vitamin d3 pills from Holland & Barrett after reading how vitamin d can help with oily skin. I am now in my third week of taking the vitamin and have seen an noticeable reduction in oil production. I can now go nearly a whole day at work without having to dab my skin, whereas before I was dabbing oil at least 2 - 3 times a day.

 

I am currently taking 2 tablets three times a day - 2 in the morning, 2 at lunch and 2 in the evenings equating to 6000 IU a day.

 

So far I have not suffered any side effects from taking this amount and am very happy with the improvement in my skin after years of suffering from oily skin.

 

However, I would appreciate some advice from other people who are taking the vitamin to combat oily skin. How many IU do you take a day and how long were you taking the vitamin for before you started to see results.



#53 XXYY

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 03:16 PM

Hi Diefenbaker3,

 

I also bought the same vitamin d3 pills from Holland & Barrett after reading how vitamin d can help with oily skin. I am now in my third week of taking the vitamin and have seen an noticeable reduction in oil production. I can now go nearly a whole day at work without having to dab my skin, whereas before I was dabbing oil at least 2 - 3 times a day.

 

I am currently taking 2 tablets three times a day - 2 in the morning, 2 at lunch and 2 in the evenings equating to 6000 IU a day.

 

So far I have not suffered any side effects from taking this amount and am very happy with the improvement in my skin after years of suffering from oily skin.

 

However, I would appreciate some advice from other people who are taking the vitamin to combat oily skin. How many IU do you take a day and how long were you taking the vitamin for before you started to see results.

 

I'm taking those too, ive only been taking them for a couple of days but ive only been taking 1200 IU (3x 400iu tablets), i think im going to up my dosage every day now and get it up to 6000. Great to hear someone has got results taking the same particular pills as me!

 


Sebum production and skin cell growth

 

"The skin not only produces vitamin D, but most skin cells also have vitamin D receptors. As acne patients we are especially interested in sebocytes (the cells that produce sebum). Test tube studies have shown that vitamin D reduces the growth of sebocytes. Fewer sebocytes means less sebum in the skin. But let’s keep in mind that these are test tube studies, and there’s no way to say if vitamin D supplementation or cream reduces sebum production in living humans."

 

just thought i'd share this as a little 'confirmation' that this actually does work smile.png

 

source: http://www.acneeinstein.com/vitamin-d-for-acne/


Edited by XXYY, 07 March 2013 - 03:18 PM.


#54 darkheart

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:19 PM

There is no cure for acne. There is only remission through therapy or one fine day you finally "grow out" of the disorder. Vitamin D has been linked to improving insulin resistance (especially in women with PCOS and such) so I can see it perhaps with prolonged exposure "alleviating" acne symptoms in some women but not curing them. I can bet money your acne wasn't severe.


Edited by darkheart, 08 March 2013 - 11:20 PM.


#55 Omnivium

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:30 AM

Hi Diefenbaker3,

 

I also bought the same vitamin d3 pills from Holland & Barrett after reading how vitamin d can help with oily skin. I am now in my third week of taking the vitamin and have seen an noticeable reduction in oil production. I can now go nearly a whole day at work without having to dab my skin, whereas before I was dabbing oil at least 2 - 3 times a day.

 

I am currently taking 2 tablets three times a day - 2 in the morning, 2 at lunch and 2 in the evenings equating to 6000 IU a day.

 

So far I have not suffered any side effects from taking this amount and am very happy with the improvement in my skin after years of suffering from oily skin.

 

However, I would appreciate some advice from other people who are taking the vitamin to combat oily skin. How many IU do you take a day and how long were you taking the vitamin for before you started to see results.

 

I'm taking those too, ive only been taking them for a couple of days but ive only been taking 1200 IU (3x 400iu tablets), i think im going to up my dosage every day now and get it up to 6000. Great to hear someone has got results taking the same particular pills as me!

 


Sebum production and skin cell growth

 

"The skin not only produces vitamin D, but most skin cells also have vitamin D receptors. As acne patients we are especially interested in sebocytes (the cells that produce sebum). Test tube studies have shown that vitamin D reduces the growth of sebocytes. Fewer sebocytes means less sebum in the skin. But let’s keep in mind that these are test tube studies, and there’s no way to say if vitamin D supplementation or cream reduces sebum production in living humans."

 

just thought i'd share this as a little 'confirmation' that this actually does work smile.png

 

source: http://www.acneeinstein.com/vitamin-d-for-acne/

 

Be careful where you get your information from. I see people quoting the author of that website all the time, but he's just a regular guy. His name is Seppo Puusa, and I think he has other acne websites, and he's a member of acne.org. I think this particular guy is smart and offers good advice, but it's better to cite peer reviewed articles like the ones from nih.gov. Literally anyone can make a website and write whatever they want on it.



#56 SebumSucks

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 10:36 AM

There is no cure for acne. There is only remission through therapy or one fine day you finally "grow out" of the disorder. Vitamin D has been linked to improving insulin resistance (especially in women with PCOS and such) so I can see it perhaps with prolonged exposure "alleviating" acne symptoms in some women but not curing them. I can bet money your acne wasn't severe.

 

I am assuming this post is directed to me.  You are right, there is no cure for acne.  There is no cure for most diseases but people will refer to treatments as cures if/when their symptoms reduce to such a low level as to be not existent or almost non existent.   I debated whether on not to use the word cure and in the end decided it was warranted as it meets the definition I have stated above.  I also wanted folks to read this thread and take interest enough to try it themselves.  Saying "Vitamin D" put me in remission" just isn't as effective to get people to read this than saying it is a cure (for me at least and perhaps hopefully for others if they try it).  Besides, a large portion of the folks that come on here are young and might not even know what the term remission means.

 

Anyhow, Vitamin D just hasn't alleviated symptoms for me, it has put my acne and oily skin into long term remission with amazing results that NO other drug or topical has ever done. I suggest you go back and actually read the whole OP, if you did you'd come to realize my acne was very, very, severe. Males don't go on three rounds of Accutane and have acne into their 30s if it's not severe.  I'd be more than happy to take your money in a bet.



#57 darkheart

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 05:56 PM

There is no cure for acne. There is only remission through therapy or one fine day you finally "grow out" of the disorder. Vitamin D has been linked to improving insulin resistance (especially in women with PCOS and such) so I can see it perhaps with prolonged exposure "alleviating" acne symptoms in some women but not curing them. I can bet money your acne wasn't severe.

 

I am assuming this post is directed to me.  You are right, there is no cure for acne.  There is no cure for most diseases but people will refer to treatments as cures if/when their symptoms reduce to such a low level as to be not existent or almost non existent.   I debated whether on not to use the word cure and in the end decided it was warranted as it meets the definition I have stated above.  I also wanted folks to read this thread and take interest enough to try it themselves.  Saying "Vitamin D" put me in remission" just isn't as effective to get people to read this than saying it is a cure (for me at least and perhaps hopefully for others if they try it).  Besides, a large portion of the folks that come on here are young and might not even know what the term remission means.

 

Anyhow, Vitamin D just hasn't alleviated symptoms for me, it has put my acne and oily skin into long term remission with amazing results that NO other drug or topical has ever done. I suggest you go back and actually read the whole OP, if you did you'd come to realize my acne was very, very, severe. Males don't go on three rounds of Accutane and have acne into their 30s if it's not severe.  I'd be more than happy to take your money in a bet.

 

You grew out of it. It's a coincidence. Vitamin D is a placebo.



#58 SebumSucks

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:12 PM

 

There is no cure for acne. There is only remission through therapy or one fine day you finally "grow out" of the disorder. Vitamin D has been linked to improving insulin resistance (especially in women with PCOS and such) so I can see it perhaps with prolonged exposure "alleviating" acne symptoms in some women but not curing them. I can bet money your acne wasn't severe.

 

I am assuming this post is directed to me.  You are right, there is no cure for acne.  There is no cure for most diseases but people will refer to treatments as cures if/when their symptoms reduce to such a low level as to be not existent or almost non existent.   I debated whether on not to use the word cure and in the end decided it was warranted as it meets the definition I have stated above.  I also wanted folks to read this thread and take interest enough to try it themselves.  Saying "Vitamin D" put me in remission" just isn't as effective to get people to read this than saying it is a cure (for me at least and perhaps hopefully for others if they try it).  Besides, a large portion of the folks that come on here are young and might not even know what the term remission means.

 

Anyhow, Vitamin D just hasn't alleviated symptoms for me, it has put my acne and oily skin into long term remission with amazing results that NO other drug or topical has ever done. I suggest you go back and actually read the whole OP, if you did you'd come to realize my acne was very, very, severe. Males don't go on three rounds of Accutane and have acne into their 30s if it's not severe.  I'd be more than happy to take your money in a bet.

 

You grew out of it. It's a coincidence. Vitamin D is a placebo.

 

 

One doesn't grow out of acne in their late 30's (especially males).  Any half competent derm can confirm that for you.  

You also don't really understand what a placebo is.  I did not start taking Vitamin D thinking or hoping it would help my skin.  I started taking Vitamin D for immune support and the effects on the skin were completely unexpected.  I  can 100% assure you the Vitamin D caused the remission.  I have over 20 years of experience trying hundreds of different things and NOTHING ELSE (other than perhaps Accutane)  has cleared me up like Vitamin D. 

 

I know it sounds too good to be true and understand your skepticism, and you should be with all the noise and garbage info out there these days (and there is a lot on these message boards too).  But please do yourself a favor and do some serious research on Vitamin D and how it acts like a hormone in the body.  



#59 darkheart

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 07:59 PM

I take Vitamin D as well as I live in Canada and we have long winters and short days which can cause a deficiency in vitamin D. It hasn't don much for my skin truth be told though (Which is why I'm skeptical for how well it has  worked for you). I've also heard it has weightloss benefits too? especially for people with insulin resistance.


Edited by darkheart, 10 March 2013 - 08:01 PM.


#60 Jofo

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:17 PM

I've been taking 1,000-2,000 IU fairly regularly and haven't noticed an improvement in my oily skin, but this thread is making me suspect that I might still be vitamin D deficient. I'm going to start taking 6,000 IU every day and I'll follow up with my results in a month or so.

 

And just as a tip, this study indicates that your body absorbs vitamin D better when taken with a large meal:

". . . it is concluded that taking vitamin D with the largest meal improves absorption and results in about a 50% increase in serum levels of 25(OH)D levels achieved."

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20200983






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