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Advice On How To Treat My Scars - Pictures Attached

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#21 coneill659

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:00 AM



4. I'd give the Dermaroller some more thought. It's cheaper, downtime is less, and the results are comparable to fractionated laser. I have to stress the importance of only being treated by a professional who uses the original medical-grade Dermaroller, with 192 needles at 1.5mm in length. Anything else is inferior and a complete waste of time and money. Dermaroller has given me my life back. Posted Image

remember there are different needle sizes for different levels of scarring. I would say 0.75mm derma roller should do the trick for you.


Thanks for the information about the tropical numbing cream. Quirky you suggested that anything less than 1.55mm derma roller is not going to be effective.

I'm prepared to deal with the extra pain if it means that the results would be guaranteed. Is there any increase risk with the 1.55mm as oppose to the 0.75mm?


Posted Image No pain! Trust me when I say that the Fraxel laser I had made me convulse on the table... it really did. Even with heavy numbing cream I still felt every pass of the laser. Compare this to the Dermaroller and I could have the treatment all day without complaining.

Everyone has a different threshold for pain. Coneill, I have had 4 professional Dermaroller treatments and I actually look forward to going again. They ease you into it by making each treatment that little bit more "aggressive" (not a good word but it's close). Your face is thoroughly cleaned and numbed before the treatment, it's a cake-walk!

0.75mm? Pfft, you might as well spend the money at the pub because it would be a waste spending it on a roller with needles that length.

You need the 1.5mm, this is science. Human skin has an average thickness of 1.5 mm so why would you opt for shorter needles when treating scars? Anything less will not reach the depths in your skin required to maximise improvement. Anything longer and it's actually detrimental to your skin! They only use longer needles on burn victims.

Again, I can't stress the importance of finding someone who is trained for and uses only the original Dermaroller. It's easy to check. Just a few questions and you'll be on the right track:

1. Is it a medical-grade, single use device? Nothing plastic! The Dermaroller is medical-grade steel. Think of this as an operation. Would you want a surgeon using a plastic knife to cut you open? Yes, the needles are not plastic but the point is about durability and sterility!

2. Does it have 192 needles at 1.5mm? If the device has any more than this then move on, move on! Too many needles will actually rip up your skin (in loose terms) and will cause unnecessary trauma which could lead to further scarring or other problems.

www.dermaroller.de <-- It's in German but there is a little English flag you can click to translate their site. Maybe read up about the actual science behind the device and understand why you need 192 needles at 1.5mm and why you must wait 6-8 weeks between treatments. Posted Image

I'm not affiliated with the Dermaroller, so don't think I'm just plugging them. I am an avid believer in their products after having my four treatments. The original Dermaroller is the only device that is TGA listed (if they use words like "approved", or "acknowledged" it means that their device is a crappy, cheap copy). I think the term is FDA in the States? It needs to be listed as every medical device in their database has gone through strict testing and has been thoroughly scrutinised. It is then, and only then, that the device can be listed as safe. Companies that claim that their device has been "approved" by the TGA (FDA) have not had their device tested and you will not find their device in the TGA/FDA database. Instead, they consider it okay to market and use a device that is similar to the Dermaroller because heck, our device looks similar so it must be fine yeah? Wrong! The term Dermaroller is used widely and inappropriately to describe other devices by other companies. Why there have been no law suits against copyright infringement is beyond me! Always look for mention of the name Horst Liebl. Posted Image

So, don't try to treat yourself at home, get a professional who uses the original Dermaroller, add in some patience and a good skin care regime and I think you'd see awesome results! Keep in mind that you'll likely need 5 treatments spaced 6-8 weeks apart though. Posted Image Don't put your skin in jeopardy by choosing an inferior device/technician. Yes, the other companies are cheaper, but this is because their devices are easier to make (plastic, inferior needles etc).

As for risks, no long-term, serious side effects or negative outcomes have ever been reported from patients who have been treated with the original German-made Dermaroller. The same cannot be said for other rollers... I've read lots of horror stories. The esthetician who treats me has also been trying to correct damage to the skin of some of her clients who have tried cheap rollers. She said they mostly look like they have enlarged pores or "cat-scratch" like lines on their faces. For privacy reasons I haven't seen pictures but I can imagine what they must look like. My esthetician also has Dermaroller treatments performed on her face (by another trained professional) so I know that she's not just in it for the money, she has also been seeing positive results in her skin. Posted Image

I'm sorry for the spiel. I get quite heated when talking about this because all the misinformation that's out there makes me angry. All I can say is do your research! Posted Image


Thanks for taking the time to write that Quirky, really helpful! :D

I will go for the dermaroller treatment and will start researching places to get it done at the end of January. I would like to have my first procedure in June of this year.

I am not a very organised person so I would like to get started with a skin regime and get into that routine well before I do the derma rolling. What can you guys recommend?

Quirky is the morning and night regime you have to keep your skin health after the derma and make your skin look better and healthier as oppose to actually treating acne? I ask this because I no longer have acne aside from some blackheads.

Thanks :D

#22 Quirky Fox

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 02:35 AM

Quirky is the morning and night regime you have to keep your skin health after the derma and make your skin look better and healthier as oppose to actually treating acne? I ask this because I no longer have acne aside from some blackheads.

Thanks Posted Image


Yes, to maximise the outcome from my treatments, keep my skin healthy and to battle any acne that decides to pop up. :)

My Skin Care Regime


** Morning **

1. DermaQuest C3 Cleanser

2. DermaQuest Niacinamide B3 serum

3. DermaQuest C3 serum (Vitamin C)

4. DermaQuest Stem Cell 3D Daily Moisturiser (tinted) SPF 15 or

    DermaQuest Daily Moisturising Lotion SPF 15 (on weekends)
 

** Makeup **

1. DermaQuest DermaPerfection Primer

2. Dermablend Smooth Indulgence Foundation SPF 15

3. Dermablend Setting Powder


** Night **

1. DermaQuest C3 Cleanser

2. DermaQuest Algae Facial Scrub (every second night)

3. DermaQuest Niacinamide B3 serum

4. DermaQuest Retexture serum (Vitamin A) (every second night)

5. DermaQuest Skin Rehydrating Serum (every other night)

6. DermaQuest Clarifying Pads (5% salicylic acid) (for my biggest acne prone areas)

7. DermaQuest DermaClear TX (for acne spots)

8. Swisse Ultiboost Hair Skin and Nails (vitamin supplement)


*** Current Treatment Plan ***

2010-2011: 5 x Fraxel Re:Store sessions - maybe 10-15% improvement.

2012-2013: 5 x Dermaroller sessions - at least 70% improvement!

2013: One eDermastamp treatment down, one more to go in Oct!


#23 newman989

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:34 PM

You might also try a single 28 gauge needle.  Takes more time than a dermaroller, but you have more control and can target smaller areas.  Get a feel for how deep to go, not doing too much too soon.  It is not that painful at all, and just a couple of days where the skin swells a bit.



#24 Quirky Fox

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:50 AM

Sorry to disagree with you Newman but home treatments are way too risky. Single needle treatments like the one you suggest are unwise. You can't simply "get a feel for how deep to go" because 1.5mm is the depth you need to go and there is no way to control that if you're stabbing your skin with a single needle like that. One slip and you risk further scarring and/or infection.

 

If you've seen results via this method then hats off to you, but I don't think it's something we should encourage others to do.


My Skin Care Regime


** Morning **

1. DermaQuest C3 Cleanser

2. DermaQuest Niacinamide B3 serum

3. DermaQuest C3 serum (Vitamin C)

4. DermaQuest Stem Cell 3D Daily Moisturiser (tinted) SPF 15 or

    DermaQuest Daily Moisturising Lotion SPF 15 (on weekends)
 

** Makeup **

1. DermaQuest DermaPerfection Primer

2. Dermablend Smooth Indulgence Foundation SPF 15

3. Dermablend Setting Powder


** Night **

1. DermaQuest C3 Cleanser

2. DermaQuest Algae Facial Scrub (every second night)

3. DermaQuest Niacinamide B3 serum

4. DermaQuest Retexture serum (Vitamin A) (every second night)

5. DermaQuest Skin Rehydrating Serum (every other night)

6. DermaQuest Clarifying Pads (5% salicylic acid) (for my biggest acne prone areas)

7. DermaQuest DermaClear TX (for acne spots)

8. Swisse Ultiboost Hair Skin and Nails (vitamin supplement)


*** Current Treatment Plan ***

2010-2011: 5 x Fraxel Re:Store sessions - maybe 10-15% improvement.

2012-2013: 5 x Dermaroller sessions - at least 70% improvement!

2013: One eDermastamp treatment down, one more to go in Oct!


#25 austra

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:16 AM

If you do single needling on your own, you should make sure the needle couldn't go deeper than around 2mm, because otherwise it could cause damage. And you have to be anal about hygiene, because of the risk of infection (disinfect everything, use sterile needles once etc). Also, you can't needle on any active acne, and if there's a chance you'd get inflamed acne where you've needled during the healing phase, you should reconsider. Needles should be very thin lancets, and shaped like a needle (also owndoc.com's needles are alright, but expensive). You should keep the needled areas covered in petrolatum jelly or something similar the first days to make sure they don't scab. Make sure the area stays clean and moisturized for the next week.

 

If you take all these precautions, I'd say doing needling on your own is relatively risk-free. The risk of infection or inflammation during healing (which could cause scarring), or going too deep with the needle are the biggest concerns. I used a thick silicone sheet as a stopper for my needle when I tried it on one scar, so that it could only penetrate 2mm at the most.

 

I think single needling is probably safer than dermarolling, because with a bigger area, the risk of infection would be larger. But I've never tried dermarolling. It's very easy to target the scars with a needle, so there is no real risk of "slipping", except you can go too deep if you have a needle that is too long and you haven't used a stopper of some sort. I would also recommend staying inside the boundaries of the scar and not needling the edges or the contour, like some have proposed. I think it's more risky and could possibly make the scar larger.


Edited by austra, 25 January 2013 - 06:21 AM.


#26 ThisSiteSucks

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 03:18 PM

I know you don't want to hear it, but I wouldn't touch em!

 

They're not severe or anything and if I saw you on the street or at a party I wouldn't automatically think "Oh he has acne scars". And if that thought even registered in my head, it would do just that and nothing more. 

 

I personally wouldn't let your that mild of scarring dictate my life. Enjoy yourself and outshine those scars with your awesome personality!

 

Best wishes wink.png