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Cool Or Hot Water?

water termprature oily skin

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#1 eg6947

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:51 AM

Hi peeps,

I wanted to know how your oily skin reacts to washing with cool water. Do you break out if you do not wash with warm\lukewarm water?

For many years, I had the (bad?) habit of using (very) warm water to shower and wash my face and hair sometimes even in the summer. I thought that would keep pore unclogged. Probably, that is one of the reasons my skin is still very oily even at mind 30's!

Thanks

Edited by eg6947, 28 October 2012 - 06:54 AM.


#2 armadillo

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 09:12 AM

I shower with very hot water and it has no effect on the oiliness of my skin [my back is also oily]. However, I tend not to wash my face with hot water though, I just use warm water in the sink.

#3 ohhhhhhnooooooo

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 04:45 PM

Never use hot water; hot water causes skin to become really dry and flakey. Due to dryness, your face can cause more oil than needed. Cool water is good to close pores. I have heard the lukewarm water is the best. There's a possibility where one can breakout from using hot water because your pores are enlarged due to the steam.
Hope this helps!

#4 bryan

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 10:08 PM

Never use hot water; hot water causes skin to become really dry and flakey. Due to dryness, your face can cause more oil than needed.


Baloney! I don't think there's any kind of "feedback" system that the skin uses to control how much sebum it makes.

#5 ohhhhhhnooooooo

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:07 AM


Never use hot water; hot water causes skin to become really dry and flakey. Due to dryness, your face can cause more oil than needed.


Baloney! I don't think there's any kind of "feedback" system that the skin uses to control how much sebum it makes.


Well according to www.health.howstuffworks.com, "the last thing you want to do is dry out your skin. If you do, it'll kick your sebaceous glands into overdrive" (Whitmore). Cite your sources?

#6 bryan

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 09:41 AM

Well according to www.health.howstuffworks.com, "the last thing you want to do is dry out your skin. If you do, it'll kick your sebaceous glands into overdrive" (Whitmore). Cite your sources?


First of all, I have no idea who "Whitmore" is. Second of all, I'm astonished that even though you've apparently been a member here since March of last year, you haven't run across any of the posts I've made challenging the "feedback" theory of sebaceous glands! I've done that, oh, maybe HUNDREDS of times here on acne.org! Posted Image

Another thing you (or your source) are vague about is the issue of "drying out your skin". You don't bother to specify whether you're talking about being "dry" from a lack of moisture (water), or "dry" from a lack of sebum. As Dr. Albert M. Kligman MD, PhD has pointed out, sebum has no significant effect at affecting the moisture content of human skin. You have to have TEN TIMES the normal amount of sebum on the face, before there's even a noticeable increase in moisture retention.

Another thing that Kligman has talked about at great length is that there is no "feedback theory" of sebaceous glands. The amount of sebum your skin makes isn't affected by how much you wash-off.

#7 ohhhhhhnooooooo

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:00 AM


Well according to www.health.howstuffworks.com, "the last thing you want to do is dry out your skin. If you do, it'll kick your sebaceous glands into overdrive" (Whitmore). Cite your sources?


First of all, I have no idea who "Whitmore" is. Second of all, I'm astonished that even though you've apparently been a member here since March of last year, you haven't run across any of the posts I've made challenging the "feedback" theory of sebaceous glands! I've done that, oh, maybe HUNDREDS of times here on acne.org! Posted Image

Another thing you (or your source) are vague about is the issue of "drying out your skin". You don't bother to specify whether you're talking about being "dry" from a lack of moisture (water), or "dry" from a lack of sebum. As Dr. Albert M. Kligman MD, PhD has pointed out, sebum has no significant effect at affecting the moisture content of human skin. You have to have TEN TIMES the normal amount of sebum on the face, before there's even a noticeable increase in moisture retention.

Another thing that Kligman has talked about at great length is that there is no "feedback theory" of sebaceous glands. The amount of sebum your skin makes isn't affected by how much you wash-off.


First of all, I have no idea who "Dr. Albert M. Kligman MD, PhD, for all I know, you could've made up this random name. Second of all, I really don't care, honestly. I'm not trying to be mean or anything but it's true; I'm just trying to suggest new things for this poster. Third of all, you're completely off subject regarding the posters question. Lastly, I said that hot water "CAN" cause more oil... keyword is CAN and hot water does have an effect with your pores.

Edited by ohhhhhhnooooooo, 02 November 2012 - 04:06 AM.


#8 bryan

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:27 AM

First of all, I have no idea who "Dr. Albert M. Kligman MD, PhD, for all I know, you could've made up this random name...


Dr. Albert M. Kligman MD, PhD, was probably the most famous name in the entire history of dermatology (he died a year or two ago). You can find a large quantity of studies by Kligman on PubMed, having to do with anything about dermatology. You can find lots and lots of references to what Kligman said in articles and studies that were't even authored by him. One of the most important things Kligman did, and something which I've referenced an ENORMOUS number of times, is the early work he did in which he soundly refuted the "feedback theory". If you want to find the truth about human skin and sebaceous glands, you would do well to learn as much as you can about Dr. Kligman's long career.

#9 Ind1g0

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 10:06 AM

Hot or cold...neitherrrr....hot water strips the natural oils and cold shocks the skin- trapping dirt and pollution in pores. Neither will kill your skin, but it is probably optimal to use luke warm water/room temp.

#10 hunyeo

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 07:11 PM

I used the steam before to "open my pores'' then later cold water to ''to close my pores"... Hmm i saw a difference a little bit... But i stopped because my acne was still going out.