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Gluten--Where's The Research?

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#21 o Havoc o

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:43 AM

Can someone here point me to any research that has been done on the acne-gluten connection?
What would really be nice is an extensive poll done on acne.org by those who've gone gluten-free.

I don't have any of the digestive symptoms, for example, but have discovered that those foods with the most gluten give me the most breakouts. But I'm still on the fence about it because of the difficulty of isolating it: foods with high gluten tend to have a high GI; gluten is in practically everything now.

So I guess my biggest questions are:

1. Where's the formal research on acne & gluten?
2. Does gluten affect acne even if you don't have an intolerance, and if so, how?

Thanks



Gluten which is associated with pretty much every autoimmune condition there is. Lectins like gluten can damage the gut lining and influence the structure and function of the intestines. One major problem they can cause is ‘increased gut permeability’ also known as ‘leaky gut’. Leaky gut is associated with both metabolic
syndrome and autoimmune disease, and causes ‘systemic inflammation’ which is at the root of various disorders. Gut dysfunction also impairs the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food and affects intestinal bacteria. Lectins can pass through the gut lining intact and reach the blood stream where some - like gluten
have the potential to interfere with the body’s normal hormonal balance, metabolism and health.

That is all you need to know. If that it isn't enough to cut gluten out then good luck with your health.

Edited by TakeToTheSkies, 09 January 2013 - 02:44 AM.

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#22 AKL

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:57 AM

Yes, but those are still theories, there's no research on healthy humans at all proving that gluten cause all these symptoms.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment. I told them they didn’t understand life.” - John Lennon


#23 hopeful26

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:24 PM

Yes, but those are still theories, there's no research on healthy humans at all proving that gluten cause all these symptoms.


Sure there is: Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that can be directly attributed to gluten. There is also plenty of research that shows that removing gluten can improve many other autoimmune conditions and their accompanying symptoms, including Hashimotos Thyroiditis (which I have).

Edited by hopeful26, 09 January 2013 - 01:25 PM.


#24 AKL

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:32 PM

Sure there is: Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that can be directly attributed to gluten. There is also plenty of research that shows that removing gluten can improve many other autoimmune conditions and their accompanying symptoms, including Hashimotos Thyroiditis (which I have).


Wait a minute...gluten causes Celiac disease? That's new to me. There's also plenty of research showing that grains are actually beneficial. In healthy individuals, not in people who are already suffering from a (lingering) autoimmune disease. I agree that they'd better stay away from gluten.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment. I told them they didn’t understand life.” - John Lennon


#25 hopeful26

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:46 PM


Sure there is: Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that can be directly attributed to gluten. There is also plenty of research that shows that removing gluten can improve many other autoimmune conditions and their accompanying symptoms, including Hashimotos Thyroiditis (which I have).


Wait a minute...gluten causes Celiac disease? That's new to me. There's also plenty of research showing that grains are actually beneficial. In healthy individuals, not in people who are already suffering from a (lingering) autoimmune disease. I agree that they'd better stay away from gluten.


Ok, I don't really want to get edgy about language here, but it should be clarified that to be attributed means to be related to or associated with, not necessarily "caused by". In any case, it's not exactly untrue. Technically speaking, the ingestion of gluten damages the intestinal villi in people who have celiac disease (as you know). There is also evidence that individuals can develop celiac disease over years of ingesting gluten. So yes, in a way, it can cause celiac disease.

One more thing - you can be "healthy" and still have an autoimmune condition.

#26 AKL

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:55 PM

Ok, I don't really want to get edgy about language here, but it should be clarified that to be attributed means to be related to or associated with, not necessarily "caused by". In any case, it's not exactly untrue. Technically speaking, the ingestion of gluten damages the intestinal villi in people who have celiac disease (as you know). There is also evidence that individuals can develop celiac disease over years of ingesting gluten. So yes, in a way, it can cause celiac disease.

One more thing - you can be "healthy" and still have an autoimmune condition.


It's not about language at all, and yes, of course people with Celiac disease can't consume gluten, it's what the disease is about. Indeed, people can develop Celiac over time. The question is: were they already sensitive to gluten to begin with? The exact causes are unknown and there is no research on healthy humans proving that grains are bad or even cause an autoimmune condition. If you do have such research, I'd be happy to stand corrected, as it may bring us one step closer to a possible solution. But again: I've never seen it.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment. I told them they didn’t understand life.” - John Lennon


#27 hopeful26

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:03 PM


Ok, I don't really want to get edgy about language here, but it should be clarified that to be attributed means to be related to or associated with, not necessarily "caused by". In any case, it's not exactly untrue. Technically speaking, the ingestion of gluten damages the intestinal villi in people who have celiac disease (as you know). There is also evidence that individuals can develop celiac disease over years of ingesting gluten. So yes, in a way, it can cause celiac disease.

One more thing - you can be "healthy" and still have an autoimmune condition.


It's not about language at all, and yes, of course people with Celiac disease can't consume gluten, it's what the disease is about. Indeed, people can develop Celiac over time. The question is: were they already sensitive to gluten to begin with? The exact causes are unknown and there is no research on healthy humans proving that grains are bad or even cause an autoimmune condition. If you do have such research, I'd be happy to stand corrected, as it may bring us one step closer to a possible solution. But again: I've never seen it.


I hear your point, and I think you're right in that the research (into early sensitivity turning into celiac disease, and into the actual "causes" of the disease) is not really there. They're now looking into genetic markers, which is really interesting stuff: http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/21278763.

My point was mainly about wheat/gluten, but I also think you raise a good point about other grains. I don't think that all grains are bad at all, but I do think that many people (especially in North America) could benefit by reducing their consumption, particularly because of the blood sugar effect they can have. I remember the old food guide (here in Canada) used to recommend 10-12 servings of grain products per day. That's crazy! I personally find I feel my best and my digestion is best when I limit my grain consumption to less than 3 servings per day. But, everyone has a different regimen that will work for them!

Edited by hopeful26, 09 January 2013 - 02:04 PM.


#28 AKL

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:12 PM

I hear your point, and I think you're right in that the research (into early sensitivity turning into celiac disease, and into the actual "causes" of the disease) is not really there. They're now looking into genetic markers, which is really interesting stuff: http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/21278763.

My point was mainly about wheat/gluten, but I also think you raise a good point about other grains. I don't think that all grains are bad at all, but I do think that many people (especially in North America) could benefit by reducing their consumption, particularly because of the blood sugar effect they can have. I remember the old food guide (here in Canada) used to recommend 10-12 servings of grain products per day. That's crazy! I personally find I feel my best and my digestion is best when I limit my grain consumption to less than 3 servings per day. But, everyone has a different regimen that will work for them!


Yes, that's very interesting, indeed. Especially since Celiac seems to occur more often in Caucasians and more in women than men, more in people who have a family member with the disease, etc. Genetics definitely play a role.

I agree that it shouldn't be a staple, 10-12 servings a day is pretty crazy, haha. And definitely, if people feel better without them, by all means, don't eat them.

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment. I told them they didn’t understand life.” - John Lennon


#29 alternativista

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:42 AM

There's quite a lot of research cited in the gliadin, wheat germ aglutinin and gluten sensitivity articles on wikipedia.

And in this article: http://www.greenmedi...erance-sayer-ji

Edited by alternativista, 10 January 2013 - 12:10 PM.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#30 Melie87

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 05:19 PM

So where do I fit in? I have been doing my homework for years now, almost 26 years old, and quite dairy about 4 years ago. Been gluten free for 8 months, no difference! I am healthy, I live in Santa Cruz, organic food is abundant and the air is perfect. I swear to god, I am at my wits end. You name it, I have done it. Except for Accutane and parts of Chinese medicine which include acupuncture. I've done the b5 which made my acne way worse. I am fed up and made an appointment with my doc about hormone imbalance testing. I mean shit, I am so damn healthy, and I STILL break out. I think people are creating acne THEMSELVES, by worrying so much about what they eat, and if it will cause a breakout. I know I do...I Worry all the time, and it is not making the problem any better.

 

Organic stone-ground whole wheat bread should do it. With no more than 3 ingredients. And remember consume in moderation.


We need to feed our skin

as we'd feed our bodies

a delicate rhythmic dance

we all deserve to find.

 

Eminence Organics

-probiotic cleanser

-hungarian face mask

-citrus exfoliating wash

 

Acure Organics

-sensitive facial cleanser

(alternating face washes helps

so my skin does not become resistant)

 

Spironolactone 25 mg 2x daily

Retin A Micro every other night

Clindamycin every other night

Clindamycin during day under light 100% Pure Mineral Powder on T zone

NO DAIRY, NO CAFFEINE, NO SUGAR!

 

 

 


#31 darkheart

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:23 PM

Gluten is one of the main causes of my acne and I would have never guessed it. You owe it to yourself to do gluten free for a few weeks and see if it helps your skin. If it dosen't then you know you have no issues, and if it does then you know you do. The bloodtests are usless, mine said I wasn't intolerant to gluten but without that and corn I'm acne free! Another thing, many gluten free products contain corn which is a very common allergen people forget about. I am more allergic to corn than gluten and corn is in everything! My advice: Try going gluten and corn free and see if it helps you. I have a great diet and a huge variety of foods to eat. You don't have to worry about every trace of gluten as you do not think you are celiac.

 

Then you do NOT have acne. You have been misdiagnosed. Acne is entirely a disorder of the hair follicle lining caused primarily by genetics and aggravated by an inborn over sensitivity to androgens. If you truly had acne despite your elimination of your purported "gluten and corn" allergy it would not fix the genetic and hormonal factor and the acne would still exist regardless. What you probably have is another skin disorder called perioral dermatitis or another type of dermatitis.

 

Go back to your dermatologist and ask for further tests as this does not sound like true Acne Vulgaris in the least.



#32 o Havoc o

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 07:24 AM

Have to say.

 

I have seriously changed my outlook on Gluten.

 

I have tried to find conclusive proof it is as bad as people say. However i have not found anything.

 

I cut gluten out for 3 months.What I thought were improvments wasn't coming from lack of gluten was imrpovements from an overall better diet.

 

I have since added gluten back in and i'm no worse off, if anything i am a lot happier because i have a wider range of food.

 

My ethos. You should only cut a food out if you have an intorlerance to it. I can handle gluten fine.


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#33 onefatalgoose

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Achievements

     

Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:17 PM

There's quite a lot of research cited in the gliadin, wheat germ aglutinin and gluten sensitivity articles on wikipedia.

And in this article: http://www.greenmedi...erance-sayer-ji

 

Great link alternativista.  Lots of great info regarding epigenetics and celiac disease.  I know you've got a whole thread on epigenetics which everyone should take a look at.  (from article) It's not the genes, but what we expose them to

 

Thought this was an interesting way to think about gluten from the article:

 

 

In a previous article, I discussed the role that wheat plays as an industrial adhesive (e.g. paints, paper mache’, and book binding-glue) in order to illustrate the point that it may not be such a good thing for us to eat. The problem is implicit in the word gluten, which literally means "glue" in Latin and in words like pastry and pasta, which derives from wheatpaste, the original concoction of wheat flour and water which made such good plaster in ancient times. What gives gluten its adhesive and difficult-to-digest qualities are the high levels of disulfide bonds it contains. These same sulfur-to-sulfur bonds are found in hair and vulcanized rubber products, which we all know are difficult to decompose and are responsible for the sulfurous odor they give off when burned. 

                                                      80%-20% Alkaline forming vs Acid forming Diet

                                                                                `Organic~
                                                                            I don't consume:
                                                                                     *Dairy
                                                                               *Whole grains
                                                                             *Refined sugars
                                                                                 *Table salt
                                                                              *Vegetable oils
                                                                        *Processed/Fast foods
                                           *Genetically Modified Foods (GMOs)
                                                                      As well as the pesticides/herbicides that come with them

                                                      My philosophy: Less externally, more internally

                 Even taking long hot showers in chemically treated tap water is too harsh for acne prone skin

                                                                 (And that's without a face wash)

                         

                                     This site is absolutely loaded with info on curing acne internally

 


#34 o Havoc o

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 06:07 AM

This is very good read.

 

There are no "clean" or "dirty" foods.

 

Based on actual research and study.

 

http://impruvism.com/


Formerly Nicky D

If you stand for nothing then you will fall for anything

#35 alternativista

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:11 PM

There's quite a lot of research cited in the gliadin, wheat germ aglutinin and gluten sensitivity articles on wikipedia.

And in this article: http://www.greenmedi...erance-sayer-ji

 

Great link alternativista.  Lots of great info regarding epigenetics and celiac disease.  I know you've got a whole thread on epigenetics which everyone should take a look at.  (from article) It's not the genes, but what we expose them to

 

Thought this was an interesting way to think about gluten from the article:

 

 

In a previous article, I discussed the role that wheat plays as an industrial adhesive (e.g. paints, paper mache’, and book binding-glue) in order to illustrate the point that it may not be such a good thing for us to eat. The problem is implicit in the word gluten, which literally means "glue" in Latin and in words like pastry and pasta, which derives from wheatpaste, the original concoction of wheat flour and water which made such good plaster in ancient times. What gives gluten its adhesive and difficult-to-digest qualities are the high levels of disulfide bonds it contains. These same sulfur-to-sulfur bonds are found in hair and vulcanized rubber products, which we all know are difficult to decompose and are responsible for the sulfurous odor they give off when burned. 

 

It's not just that it's 'glue' but that it binds to the very substance that our digestive tracts are lined with (and that insect exoskelatons are made of)


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!