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Has Anyone Been To An Endocrinologist For Oily Skin?

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Since oily skin is supposed to be caused by hormones or a sensitivity to hormones, has anyone gone to get their hormones levels tested by an endocrinologist? If so, how did they test for hormones? How many hormones did they test? Was it expensive? Was it worth it?

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

How oily was your skin to begin with out of curiosity?

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

How oily was your skin to begin with out of curiosity?

Pretty damn oily, especially my chin.

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Calcium gives you dry skin. Drink plain kefir/yogurt homemade if possible and if you don't break out. Vegetable juice (carrot, cucumber celery) might also help. But the best thing will be to do hardcore baba ramdev yoga for skin disease headstand, shoulder stand etc. which I am doing right now. Supposedly strengthens the hormonal glands.

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

Why would putting OIL on your skin make it less oily?? eusa_think.gifsmile.png

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

Why would putting OIL on your skin make it less oily?? eusa_think.gifsmile.png

You wouldn't think it would work, but many people on here have noticed a tremendous decrease in oil production when using an oil that is very similar to human sebum, such as jojoba oil. People tend to think it tricks your skin into thinking it already has enough oil, therefore doesn't produce the massive amounts it used to.

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

Why would putting OIL on your skin make it less oily?? eusa_think.gifsmile.png

I have always wondered the same. I see lots of people claiming this though, whether it be by oil cleansing or just using the oil as a moisturizer. Personally I'm pretty scared of putting oil on my face. I've tried using coconut oil before, and it broke me out horribly.

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

Why would putting OIL on your skin make it less oily?? eusa_think.gifsmile.png

I have always wondered the same. I see lots of people claiming this though, whether it be by oil cleansing or just using the oil as a moisturizer. Personally I'm pretty scared of putting oil on my face. I've tried using coconut oil before, and it broke me out horribly.

Coconut oil is highly comedogenic. I believe it's rated 4 where as jojoba is rated O. If I have a pimple coming up, jojoba completely erases it overnight. It's amazing. I used to love emu oil, but jojoba has been better. It's a great product.

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No,but i can confidently say jojoba oil has reduced my oily skin almost completely.

Does this help most people? I don't have a very good feeling about it...

Calcium gives you dry skin. Drink plain kefir/yogurt homemade if possible and if you don't break out. Vegetable juice (carrot, cucumber celery) might also help. But the best thing will be to do hardcore baba ramdev yoga for skin disease headstand, shoulder stand etc. which I am doing right now. Supposedly strengthens the hormonal glands.

How does calcium give you dry skin? Milk is not the healthiest source of calcium, but I used to drink it every day and my skin was still really oily. I was thinking maybe it contributed to my oily skin - because of the hormones, not the calcium.

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Not plain milk as it is full of growth hormones and the lactose is not easily digestible. Look into homemade kefir/yogurt as the fermentation makes the milk hormone and lactose free. If not carrot cucumber juice will also give you Calcium and Vitamin A

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Why would putting OIL on your skin make it less oily?? eusa_think.gifsmile.png

You wouldn't think it would work, but many people on here have noticed a tremendous decrease in oil production when using an oil that is very similar to human sebum, such as jojoba oil. People tend to think it tricks your skin into thinking it already has enough oil, therefore doesn't produce the massive amounts it used to.

I think that idea is completely preposterous, and I doubt that you'll find any dermatologist who believes it.

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I've been to an endocrinologist, not just for oily skin though. According to the blood tests I had done my DHEA was slightly elevated. My endocrinologist didn't even pursue it, and I'm not sure if that's good or bad. It was always my impression though that people with oily skin don't always have to have elevated male hormone levels, I think our skin may just be more sensitive to it for some reason. I wish I knew the reason :(

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I've been to an endocrinologist, not just for oily skin though. According to the blood tests I had done my DHEA was slightly elevated. My endocrinologist didn't even pursue it, and I'm not sure if that's good or bad. It was always my impression though that people with oily skin don't always have to have elevated male hormone levels, I think our skin may just be more sensitive to it for some reason. I wish I knew the reason sad.png

Finally someone is on topic lol. Yea I don't think I have particularly high androgens. I have a hard time gaining weight and muscle, I can't grow much facial hair, and I'm not aggressive whatsoever. Yet my skin is very oily all the time.

So how many hormones did they test for? How much did it cost? Do you think it was worth it?

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I've been to an endocrinologist, not just for oily skin though. According to the blood tests I had done my DHEA was slightly elevated. My endocrinologist didn't even pursue it, and I'm not sure if that's good or bad. It was always my impression though that people with oily skin don't always have to have elevated male hormone levels, I think our skin may just be more sensitive to it for some reason. I wish I knew the reason sad.png

Finally someone is on topic lol. Yea I don't think I have particularly high androgens. I have a hard time gaining weight and muscle, I can't grow much facial hair, and I'm not aggressive whatsoever. Yet my skin is very oily all the time.

So how many hormones did they test for? How much did it cost? Do you think it was worth it?

I'm not sure how much it cost, my parents paid for it. I think that they tested for all the major hormones like progesterone, estrogen, testosterone, dht, and dhea. I'm not really sure if I feel like it was worth it. My doctor really did nothing with the information, and based on symptoms alone I already basically new the results..

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I'm not sure how much it cost, my parents paid for it. I think that they tested for all the major hormones like progesterone, estrogen, testosterone, dht, and dhea. I'm not really sure if I feel like it was worth it. My doctor really did nothing with the information, and based on symptoms alone I already basically new the results..

Ok thanks for answering. That's what I was afraid of - going there and having them test my hormones and them being like "Your hormones are fine. That will be $500."

So I probably won't go to an endocrinologist unless a lot of people say it was worth it for them.

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You could try a at-home hormone test from ZRT Lab (I paid around $250 for it). I took one that measured:

  • Estradiol

  • Progesterone

  • Testosterone

  • DHEAS

  • Cortisol

  • Free T4, Free T3

  • TSH, TPO

  • Vitamin D2/D3

BTW, I have acne with oily skin, and all my results were pretty normal, with the exception of T3 and Vitamin D (both slightly on the lower side).

You may also want to check out their cardiometabolic test. In that test, every thing was normal for me EXCEPT my fasting insulin level, which was on the high side (despite following a low-sugar, dairy-free, gluten-free diet). My number almost matched the fasting insulin level of the acne group in this study (10.6 mIU/ml).

Ok thanks for answering. That's what I was afraid of - going there and having them test my hormones and them being like "Your hormones are fine. That will be $500."

So I probably won't go to an endocrinologist unless a lot of people say it was worth it for them.

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You could try a at-home hormone test from ZRT Lab (I paid around $250 for it). I took one that measured:

  • Estradiol
  • Progesterone
  • Testosterone
  • DHEAS
  • Cortisol
  • Free T4, Free T3
  • TSH, TPO
  • Vitamin D2/D3

BTW, I have acne with oily skin, and all my results were pretty normal, with the exception of T3 and Vitamin D (both slightly on the lower side).

You may also want to check out their cardiometabolic test. In that test, every thing was normal for me EXCEPT my fasting insulin level, which was on the high side (despite following a low-sugar, dairy-free, gluten-free diet). My number almost matched the fasting insulin level of the acne group in this study (10.6 mIU/ml).

I'm pretty sure my vitamin D is low because I never used to go outside lol. I started going outside for some vitamin D recently though. What is T3?

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T4 and T3 have to do with the thyroid.

If you are hyperthyroid, this can cause excess androgen activity, which can be linked to elevated testosterone. You can also have excess androgen activity without elevated testosterone, but this would not show up on those tests.

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I've had various hormones checked and other blood tests done and all were considered normal. Last week for two days in a row my skin produced very little sebum. I then ballsed it up by changing various things and the sebum came back. Now I'm going over what I did last week for this to happen. Will let you know if I find out.

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So your skin is normally oily, but doctors said your hormones are fine? It sucks that it's so hard to even know the cause of oily skin.

I never really had a day where I produced little sebum. My face is just a constant oil factory. So yea, I'll be interested to hear why your skin was less oily.

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Yeah, usually very oily and I've had lots of tests done several times now and always normal, which is why I thought I would add my 2 cents as your tests will no doubt be more costly than mine. I have a list of things I did last week so I'm going to try them again and fingers crossed.

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I have been to an endocrinologist before, but for a different reason, anyway, my regular GP did a test to see my hormones were normal, and my results were pretty normal and I do have extremely oily skin. I don't think it's always to do with an imbalance, in some people it is, in some people it isn't.

I have no idea how much it costs to see an endocrinologist, I live in the UK = free healthcare

By the way, there is no reason why a regular physcian/doctor couldn't do a hormone test, I assume that would cost less? If not, you might be better off getting insurance.

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Since studies have shown that you can have receptor sensitivity to normal hormone levels, meaning you can have the effects of elevated hormones without the elevated hormones. I'd only go for it if it doesn't cost you a ton of money.

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... I live in the UK = free healthcare ...

At least until the conservatives privatise the NHS...

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