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Sea Salt Soaks For Scars

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#1 onefatalgoose

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 03:53 AM

I've been looking into this lately and am on my third day of trying it. I'm experimenting for the purpose of depressed scar healing. He talks about water as hot as you can stand it, but i've been using warm. I'm giving this a full eight weeks, and i'm not sure about exfoliating, but i may or may not start doing that with a baby hair brush. Also i'm using Celtic light grey sea salt. I'm personally not taking a shower afterwards, but i'm not saying it's a bad thing.

From his post:

"Results have been a process, not an event. Its been about eight weeks......about a 75% VISUAL improvement and about a 90% improvement in TEXTURE.......big ugly depressed scars/marks from wounds I was told would never heal are gone."

Anyway, thought this would be great for anyone else looking for scar treatment

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/index.php/topic/86369-what-has-worked-for-me-sea-salt/

#2 A damsel in Distress

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 01:27 PM

Hey let me know how this goes! I dont have any scars (a lot of hyperpigmentation thoPosted Image )
But I have a friend that does. If it works Im sure he'd try it!Posted Image

#3 DRaGZ

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 01:49 PM

Erm...a few issues:

1. Why would sea salt as opposed to just regular salt make a major difference? Sea salt has maybe 1% extra mineral impurities compared to just regular salt, there's basically no difference.
2. What exactly would salt do to scars?
3. He doesn't seem to be talking about scars, he seems to be talking mostly about acne control.
4. If he has any improvement on his scars at all, it's very likely that he's just experiencing microswelling that he's sustaining on a regular basis. A very hot bath + rubbing your face with a brush would cause an abrasive effect that causes your skin to swell, which results in the appearance that scars are gone. But, in reality, it's temporary. I suppose you could do this everyday for the rest of your life, though, kinda like a make-up thing?

I don't mean to sound like a pessimistic asshole, but if hot salt water + a bit of brushing everyday really fixed acne scars, then these forums wouldn't exist.

Edited by DRaGZ, 02 August 2012 - 01:50 PM.


#4 onefatalgoose

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 02:38 AM

Erm...a few issues:

1. Why would sea salt as opposed to just regular salt make a major difference? Sea salt has maybe 1% extra mineral impurities compared to just regular salt, there's basically no difference.
2. What exactly would salt do to scars?
3. He doesn't seem to be talking about scars, he seems to be talking mostly about acne control.
4. If he has any improvement on his scars at all, it's very likely that he's just experiencing microswelling that he's sustaining on a regular basis. A very hot bath + rubbing your face with a brush would cause an abrasive effect that causes your skin to swell, which results in the appearance that scars are gone. But, in reality, it's temporary. I suppose you could do this everyday for the rest of your life, though, kinda like a make-up thing?

I don't mean to sound like a pessimistic asshole, but if hot salt water + a bit of brushing everyday really fixed acne scars, then these forums wouldn't exist.


Table salt is so chemically altered by the heating process, that your body recognizes it as a foreign object. It's also bleached and stripped of all the trace minerals, which do in fact make a big difference if your going to be soaking in them for any period of time.

Also who knows, in regards to the scars? Maybe it's an illusion, but maybe it isn't. He seems to be convinced that scars he thought would never heal, even indented scars, were healing and disappearing. Maybe he's exaggerating, but maybe he isn't. I really don't know, but it's worth testing out yourself.

Just because something is truly effective, it doesn't mean it's going to be mainstream. High dose nutritional therapies for cancer are dwarfing the success rates of traditional chemos/radiation/surgery. And for a reason. They are addressing the underlying reason cancer can exist in your body. Not just the symptoms. Many factors including liver function, alkalinity, vitamins, diet, are addressed in nutritional therapies. They work to build the body up, not break it down, thus leaving you in an even more susceptible state. They also use upwards of 100,000mg of Intravenous vitamin C as a chemo. It is selectively toxic to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unharmed.

All that to say...

Just because something works, does not mean it's going to be mainstream. No skin company is going to be pushing or advertising using salt soaks. There's no money in it for them. Just like the 200 billion dollar a year traditional cancer industry isn't going to be pushing high dose nutritional therapies. Much, much less profit in it for them. Most cancer patients are unaware that they even have other/better options for dealing with it. Also most people haven't even tried this sea salt soak technique. It is a process, not a miracle overnight cream, which is what many people are looking for. Something easy

Anyway, i'm going to continue doing this to see if it's as good as it's been advertised to be

Edited by onefatalgoose, 03 August 2012 - 02:44 AM.


#5 DRaGZ

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 04:36 AM


Erm...a few issues:

1. Why would sea salt as opposed to just regular salt make a major difference? Sea salt has maybe 1% extra mineral impurities compared to just regular salt, there's basically no difference.
2. What exactly would salt do to scars?
3. He doesn't seem to be talking about scars, he seems to be talking mostly about acne control.
4. If he has any improvement on his scars at all, it's very likely that he's just experiencing microswelling that he's sustaining on a regular basis. A very hot bath + rubbing your face with a brush would cause an abrasive effect that causes your skin to swell, which results in the appearance that scars are gone. But, in reality, it's temporary. I suppose you could do this everyday for the rest of your life, though, kinda like a make-up thing?

I don't mean to sound like a pessimistic asshole, but if hot salt water + a bit of brushing everyday really fixed acne scars, then these forums wouldn't exist.


Table salt is so chemically altered by the heating process, that your body recognizes it as a foreign object. It's also bleached and stripped of all the trace minerals, which do in fact make a big difference if your going to be soaking in them for any period of time.

Also who knows, in regards to the scars? Maybe it's an illusion, but maybe it isn't. He seems to be convinced that scars he thought would never heal, even indented scars, were healing and disappearing. Maybe he's exaggerating, but maybe he isn't. I really don't know, but it's worth testing out yourself.

Just because something is truly effective, it doesn't mean it's going to be mainstream. High dose nutritional therapies for cancer are dwarfing the success rates of traditional chemos/radiation/surgery. And for a reason. They are addressing the underlying reason cancer can exist in your body. Not just the symptoms. Many factors including liver function, alkalinity, vitamins, diet, are addressed in nutritional therapies. They work to build the body up, not break it down, thus leaving you in an even more susceptible state. They also use upwards of 100,000mg of Intravenous vitamin C as a chemo. It is selectively toxic to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unharmed.

All that to say...

Just because something works, does not mean it's going to be mainstream. No skin company is going to be pushing or advertising using salt soaks. There's no money in it for them. Just like the 200 billion dollar a year traditional cancer industry isn't going to be pushing high dose nutritional therapies. Much, much less profit in it for them. Most cancer patients are unaware that they even have other/better options for dealing with it. Also most people haven't even tried this sea salt soak technique. It is a process, not a miracle overnight cream, which is what many people are looking for. Something easy

Anyway, i'm going to continue doing this to see if it's as good as it's been advertised to be


1. You cannot chemically alter salt just by heating it. You can maybe cause it to form into different crystalline structures depending on how you reform through processes that may involve heat, but it's still NaCl. If it was chemically altered by heat, it would no longer be salt, it would be something else.
2. "Megavitamin therapy" is almost universally considered by the medical community to be a farce. Successful results from megavitamin therapy have been inconclusive, unproven, provided under sketchy pretenses, and/or are benefited from placebo effect (essentially, having a very positive attitude, which has been well-documented as being beneficial in the treatment of cancer). A cursory Google search of the term yields thousands of results that show how megavitamin therapy is not only ineffective but could also possibly damage the body through overdoses of vitamin D and A. "Vitamin" isn't a code word for "stuff that is good for you." It stands for "vital amines," and amines are just organic compounds. They're not a miracle cure for everything, and yes, you can even overdose on vitamins.
3. Massive doses of vitamin C just piss out of your system in a matter of hours. Your body can only internally absorb so much vitamin C at once, and it can only distribute that vitamin C to specific systems in specific proportions. Vitamin C is strange in that you can't OD on it, but taking a lot of it also doesn't do anything at all. It's why vitamin C supplements that offer 100000% of your daily vitamin C requirement are all total bullshit. Just drink a fucking glass of apple juice, it's the same shit.
4. If something works, especially if it's something as simple as soaking your face in hot salt water, people will have picked up on it. Centuries ago. And it would've been a very well-known thing. There's a skin bleacher called "kojic acid." We Westerners are just picking up on it now, but the Japanese have been using it for centuries as an extract from a specific berry. We're only just discovering the exact mechanisms of why it works, in that it deactivates the production of melanin in the skin, but the point is that it actually works. People figured out how to extract a specific type of acid from a berry and have it work as a skin bleacher (an effect which takes months, so it must've taken decades to fully make this discovery), and this was established CENTURIES ago. If something works, it proliferates. If it doesn't, it eventually dies out like the quackery it is. And I've never even heard of anyone treating their scars with just hot water and salt, much less get any results from it. If they could figure out that acid from berries had a very specific bleaching effect centuries ago, I'm sure they would've figured out hot salt water did some shit, too.

I don't mean to sound condescending, but I want you to, y'know, live in reality as well. Scars don't go away just by soaking them. They're scars. Your body thinks they're already healed tissue and wants nothing more to do with it. I recommend you go try something that has actually been established to work. Or I guess you could keep trying to use treatments that have no established basis behind them whatsoever. Hell, do whatever you want, I guess I don't really care.

#6 onefatalgoose

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 08:01 AM

Ok so...

The vitamin C is given via an IV drip. So it gets around how much your body can absorb, because there's no need for your body to absorb it. It's already flowing directly into the bloodstream. And your blood is traveling to every part of your body, and every internal organ

And of course doctors and the medical community are going to discredit nutritional therapies. Duh. The majority of them don't even know how important nutrition is for healing and overall health. Believe it or not, they don't. They go to medical school, are taught medical practices, and then they go practice them. This is not a conspiracy, this is how the world of medicine works. This is reality

Since the American Association of Poison Control Centers has been reporting, annually, the number of deaths from vitamins, (since 1983) there have been zero. Zero. Everyone has this great fear of vitamins, and it's ridiculous and based on medical community brainwash

Before you discredit nutritional therapies by citing a bunch of googled medical opinions, i'll ask you to research it thoroughly and un-biased (which might not be possible since you seem very angry at the idea of nature possibly providing a cure). Cancer is both preventible and reversible via nutrition and alkalinity. And the success rates are indeed dwarfing those of traditional medicine. Why? Because they are addressing the underlying issue as to why cancer is able to thrive in your body. Not just the symptoms

Your reaction to the idea of nutrition as a means to prevent and reverse cancer is proving why this isn't mainstream. You hear about it, assume that if it actually worked your doctor would be telling you about it, and then continue to discredit it without thoroughly and objectively researching it. Doctors aren't interested in nutrition. They're interested in medicine, unless you are an Orthomolecular doctor, or one of the rare doctors that are indeed interested.

You realize traditional cancer treatment is a 200 billion dollar a year industry? Doctors have honest intentions, and you can have honest intentions and still be wrong about how you're addressing an issue like cancer. Pharmaceutical companies are making bank off of chemo therapies, and they are the ones shoving this onto doctors. That's how the field of medicine works. You have pharma reps showing up to push another drug into being used, and doctors with little time to actually research the drug. Doctor's assume pharma has their patients best interest in mind. Again, another assumption. Pharma isn't going to be shouting from rooftops that if you change your diet and begin high dose nutritional therapies, you can effectively reverse cancer. It isn't profitable. It just isn't, and pharma is motivated by money. This is the way the world works, and it sucks

This is why chemo/radiation/surgery are thought to be the only solutions to cancer. Because people hear 'nutritional therapy' and roll their eyes and call BS without thoroughly researching it.

Take some time and objectively research it. And don't show so much hostility towards an idea that you've barely scratched the surface of. There's no need to for it



Also yes, in table salt, the molecular structure of the salt is altered to the point where your body does not recognize it and wants to get rid of it as quickly as possible. It isn't safe to be consuming, bottom line

And how do you know soaking in mineral rich sea salt water won't have an effect on scars? Have you tried it? Again, you're discrediting something you haven't even tried. Something that someone else on this forum has indeed tried, and reported excellent results with. I'm not sure if it will, and i'm not sure that it won't. But automatically ruling something out because it doesn't 'sound' like it would work is foolish

You seem to have a bit of anger in your tone, and i'm not sure it's necessary. At all. Remember, we're trying to help each other on this forum

http://orthomolecula...ns/v07n05.shtml

http://www.doctoryourself.com/ckorea2008.html

http://www.doctoryourself.com/gersonspeech.html

All have references and are peer reviewed by doctors. This is just for starters

Edited by onefatalgoose, 03 August 2012 - 08:18 AM.


#7 ManFeelings

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 09:01 AM

That isn't funny at all. This is exactly the kind of misinformation terrorists spread so they can turn patriots against their goverment and get them to bomb airports, malls, movie theaters, etc and torture innocent hard working Americans like myself and many others on this site. You're reading their propoganda. I'm keeping an eye on you from here on out.

#8 A damsel in Distress

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 12:13 PM

That isn't funny at all. This is exactly the kind of misinformation terrorists spread so they can turn patriots against their goverment and get them to bomb airports, malls, movie theaters, etc and torture innocent hard working Americans like myself and many others on this site. You're reading their propoganda. I'm keeping an eye on you from here on out.


Oh. My. God.
I can't believe this.
Seriously?Posted Image
I mean, come on.

#9 *Inspired*

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 12:16 PM

Onefatalgoose, I am surprised you would venture to the "scars" forum again after last time. We are not a gullible group here, and don't want to hear about your "home remedies" for scars because they do not work. I think you and ManFeelings should post this crap over at the Nutrition & holistic health board.

Btw, I've been using Kanebo's Japanese sea salt & kelp face cleanser, toner and moisturizer for 5+ years. Does nothing for scars. Great exfoliator & keeps my skin soft. They put sea salt in a lot of skin care products in Japan but I have never seen any company claim that it can reverse damaged or lost tissue.

#10 DRaGZ

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 01:56 PM

Ok so...

The vitamin C is given via an IV drip. So it gets around how much your body can absorb, because there's no need for your body to absorb it. It's already flowing directly into the bloodstream. And your blood is traveling to every part of your body, and every internal organ


lol, that's not how vitamin C works. No matter HOW MUCH YOU STUFF INTO YOUR BODY, your body can still only absorb a specific amount of vitamin C every few hours. Residual vitamin C stays in your body for longer than that, but the rate of absorption doesn't change, and the majority of it is excreted from the body when you pee. This is very, very well-documented behavior.

And of course doctors and the medical community are going to discredit nutritional therapies. Duh. The majority of them don't even know how important nutrition is for healing and overall health. Believe it or not, they don't. They go to medical school, are taught medical practices, and then they go practice them. This is not a conspiracy, this is how the world of medicine works. This is reality

Since the American Association of Poison Control Centers has been reporting, annually, the number of deaths from vitamins, (since 1983) there have been zero. Zero. Everyone has this great fear of vitamins, and it's ridiculous and based on medical community brainwash


Because they're not a poison? The poison control center keeps track of well-known household items that are known to be poisonous. They don't keep track of water overdoses, which are actually more common than you'd think. They don't keep track of raw potato overdoses, which is also actually a thing. And they don't keep track of vitamin overdoses, which actually happen often enough for it be a recordable trend: http://en.wikipedia....tamin_poisoning

oh and hey look Poison Control Centers DID report three deaths from vitamin overdoses in 2004, but hey that mustn't be real let's just ignore that fact and just keep believing in what we want to believe

Before you discredit nutritional therapies by citing a bunch of googled medical opinions, i'll ask you to research it thoroughly and un-biased (which might not be possible since you seem very angry at the idea of nature possibly providing a cure). Cancer is both preventible and reversible via nutrition and alkalinity. And the success rates are indeed dwarfing those of traditional medicine. Why? Because they are addressing the underlying issue as to why cancer is able to thrive in your body. Not just the symptoms

Your reaction to the idea of nutrition as a means to prevent and reverse cancer is proving why this isn't mainstream. You hear about it, assume that if it actually worked your doctor would be telling you about it, and then continue to discredit it without thoroughly and objectively researching it. Doctors aren't interested in nutrition. They're interested in medicine, unless you are an Orthomolecular doctor, or one of the rare doctors that are indeed interested.

You realize traditional cancer treatment is a 200 billion dollar a year industry? Doctors have honest intentions, and you can have honest intentions and still be wrong about how you're addressing an issue like cancer. Pharmaceutical companies are making bank off of chemo therapies, and they are the ones shoving this onto doctors. That's how the field of medicine works. You have pharma reps showing up to push another drug into being used, and doctors with little time to actually research the drug. Doctor's assume pharma has their patients best interest in mind. Again, another assumption. Pharma isn't going to be shouting from rooftops that if you change your diet and begin high dose nutritional therapies, you can effectively reverse cancer. It isn't profitable. It just isn't, and pharma is motivated by money. This is the way the world works, and it sucks

This is why chemo/radiation/surgery are thought to be the only solutions to cancer. Because people hear 'nutritional therapy' and roll their eyes and call BS without thoroughly researching it.

Take some time and objectively research it. And don't show so much hostility towards an idea that you've barely scratched the surface of. There's no need to for it


I have hostility because it's quackery. You do realize that nearly every case in which megavitamin therapy claimed to have worked, it was done in conjunction with other therapies (including the chemo which you keep implying isn't as effective) and/or the original case of cancer was even quantifiable in the first place? I don't care for when people attempt to spread misinformation.


Also yes, in table salt, the molecular structure of the salt is altered to the point where your body does not recognize it and wants to get rid of it as quickly as possible. It isn't safe to be consuming, bottom line


Seriously, what the fuck are you talking about? "the molecular structure of salt," lol, it's a fucking ionic compound. We're not talking about crystal meth here, we're talking about a very simply compound composed of two ions. Unless you're talking about iodized salt, which hasn't been mainstream since the 1980's, this is absolute nonsense. ESPECIALLY if you're trying to imply that the application of heat somehow changes the actual compound itself. It's still NaCl. Do you know why there is a technique called "salt crusting" that chefs use? Where they cover a large piece of meat with a thick layer of salt in order to cook it evenly under extreme heat? It's because salt isn't chemically affected by the application of heat, unless you take that heat level to nearly 1500 degrees Farenheit.

And how do you know soaking in mineral rich sea salt water won't have an effect on scars? Have you tried it? Again, you're discrediting something you haven't even tried. Something that someone else on this forum has indeed tried, and reported excellent results with. I'm not sure if it will, and i'm not sure that it won't. But automatically ruling something out because it doesn't 'sound' like it would work is foolish

You seem to have a bit of anger in your tone, and i'm not sure it's necessary. At all. Remember, we're trying to help each other on this forum


I'm angry because you are trying to give people false hope in a treatment that decidedly won't actually do anything. Like I said, if hot salt water soaks actually did anything, we would have known centuries ago. There is no conspiracy to bring down cheap home remedies, it's just a fact that most home remedies don't work. It's a well-documented fact that lemon juice helps deal with hyper-pigmentation, especially those from acne. It's also a well-documented fact that green tea when applied to the skin helps with overall redness and skin swelling. These facts haven't been "hidden" away by the medical community, they've actually been well-researched and applied. I used to actually be a scientific researcher, y'know. We don't go out of our way to hide things just because it's something everyone else can do, there's no stupid conspiracy like that.

http://orthomolecula...ns/v07n05.shtml

http://www.doctoryou...ckorea2008.html

http://www.doctoryou...rsonspeech.html

All have references and are peer reviewed by doctors. This is just for starters


By what doctors? And what medical boards?

Did you know that this guy was technically a doctor too? http://en.wikipedia....ndrew_Wakefield

And he instigated what is probably the most harmful medical movement in the history of modern medicine.

Sometimes a conspiracy is a conspiracy. But most of the time, it's just a crazy person trying to convince gullible people that what normal people believe are wrong.

Edited by DRaGZ, 03 August 2012 - 02:01 PM.


#11 *Inspired*

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 02:29 PM

1. Why would sea salt as opposed to just regular salt make a major difference? Sea salt has maybe 1% extra mineral impurities compared to just regular salt, there's basically no difference.


DRaGZ,


What's your opinion on this?
http://www.elle.com/...benefits-612016

No different than table salt? I'm just curious because I have been using products with Dead Sea Salt for years and it's not cheap. I love the products though, and it really keeps my skin clear. However, I may have just fallen for marketing. Sea salt is extremely popular in the Asia Pacific.

#12 DRaGZ

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 02:48 PM


1. Why would sea salt as opposed to just regular salt make a major difference? Sea salt has maybe 1% extra mineral impurities compared to just regular salt, there's basically no difference.


DRaGZ,


What's your opinion on this?
http://www.elle.com/...benefits-612016

No different than table salt? I'm just curious because I have been using products with Dead Sea Salt for years and it's not cheap. I love the products though, and it really keeps my skin clear. However, I may have just fallen for marketing. Sea salt is extremely popular in the Asia Pacific.


I don't doubt the theraputic properties of mineral-rich waters. I also don't doubt that the minerals which accumulate in Dead Sea salt (probably because the process of collecting that salt is simply evaporating the water, leaving behind all residuals in the remaining salt) can be beneficial for you. As far as I can tell, it's mostly a collection of regular table salt (NaCl) along with other naturally occurring salts, like KCl and whatnot? I'm honestly not sure what sort of effects that could overall have on skin complexion.

That being said, it's probably not hurting? If you like what the products are doing, I'd say to keep using it.

Like, I wasn't trying to discourage onefatalgoose from doing his hot salt bath or whatever. He can do whatever he wants, I don't care. I just don't care for when he tries to justify its efficacy with misinformation.

EDIT: I should elaborate. Perhaps the reason the Dead Sea salt treatment is helping with keeping your skin clear is because it has an anti-bacterial effect. Skin breakouts are a result of bacteria, they're basically bacterial infections. Various salts have been determined, especially table salt, have been well-documented to have anti-bacterial/fungale effects, and it's also well-documented that certain types of salts affect certain types of micro-organisms but not others. For instance, table salt is very anti-bacterial, except to those that are already adept at living in levels of high salinity (like in the ocean). On the other hand, many of these same bacteria can't live in an environment that is calcium chloride or potassium chloride-rich. I believe calcium chloride, in particular, is supposed to be good as an anti-fungal? It might, thus, be reasonable to conclude that a combination of these salts would help combat a range of bacteria and fungi.

But this is all speculation, I'm not an expert.

Edited by DRaGZ, 03 August 2012 - 03:00 PM.


#13 *Inspired*

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 03:31 PM

Thanks for your opinion. I didn't know salt had an anti-bacterial effect, and had never really thought about it until now. I had always just assumed Dead Sea salt was good for exfoliation and hydration, plus minerals. I don't plan to stop using the products. It really does keep my skin clear, smooth and soft. Sadly, it does nothing for my scars though. Like many, I wish scar treatment was that simple.

Edited by TokyoGirl, 03 August 2012 - 03:41 PM.


#14 DRaGZ

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 04:57 PM

Thanks for your opinion. I didn't know salt had an anti-bacterial effect, and had never really thought about it until now. I had always just assumed Dead Sea salt was good for exfoliation and hydration, plus minerals. I don't plan to stop using the products. It really does keep my skin clear, smooth and soft. Sadly, it does nothing for my scars though. Like many, I wish scar treatment was that simple.


Specifically, most bacteria have cell membranes which are vulnerable to to how hygroscopic water is: the salt literally sucks the bacteria dry. It's why salting meats and whatnot has been a reliable method of food preservation for centuries.

#15 onefatalgoose

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 06:12 AM

Onefatalgoose, I am surprised you would venture to the "scars" forum again after last time. We are not a gullible group here, and don't want to hear about your "home remedies" for scars because they do not work. I think you and ManFeelings should post this crap over at the Nutrition & holistic health board.

Btw, I've been using Kanebo's Japanese sea salt & kelp face cleanser, toner and moisturizer for 5+ years. Does nothing for scars. Great exfoliator & keeps my skin soft. They put sea salt in a lot of skin care products in Japan but I have never seen any company claim that it can reverse damaged or lost tissue.


So...you realize this isn't my home remedy for scars, correct? I reposted someone else's experiences. What is this 'after last' time talk? You mean last time when i talked about how the doctor/pharmaceutical relationship works? About how doctors aren't evil people and are doing what they think is best? And how this doesn't apply to every doctor? I'm assuming you mean that last time.

I ventured over here to try and offer another solution for scar treatment. Don't think I regret it for one second. It's interesting how people actually take personal offense to the idea of alternative solutions. There is no need for it. I'm not claiming sea salt soaks will work. I'm showing you that someone else has had success with his scars doing this. What you do from there is up to you. Don't be so quick to shoot an idea down, especially when you haven't personally tried it. (And washing your face with a sea salt cleanser isn't the same as soaking in sea salt water for 40 minutes)

#16 onefatalgoose

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 06:57 AM

Also in regards to vitamin C, your body does regulate how much you can absorb. Through your stomach/GI tract. A steady stream of 100,000mg throughout the day is going directly into the bloodstream. Are you familiar with how an IV works? The vitamin C is such a powerful anti-oxident, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-viral, etc. So it is detoxing your system, boosting your immune system, and fighting cancer cells in the process. While on this, you do in fact have to drink water and urinate frequently, as the vitamin C isn't being stored away, which is what i think you believe is what i'm saying.

You don't need to absorb any excess of vitamin C for this to be effective, because you are bypassing the absorption process. Whatever vitamin C isn't being utilized is eventually urinated out of your system

Now, in regards to table salt. You realize that table salt 'sodium chloride' is bathed in a solution of chlorine in order to bleach it? And...you realize that sulfates and/or silicate of aluminum is added as an anti-caking agent? And it's stripped of all of it's trace minerals? Also it's common for salt water to be heated at temperatures of over 1200 degrees F, which does indeed alter the structure of the salt. You shouldn't be consuming anything this altered from it's natural state. Just like cooking oils above their smoke point become toxic to the body, the same is true for sodium chloride in the form of table salt

Sodium chloride is used in saline solutions for IV drips as well. The difference is, high heat, bleaching, and adding of toxic compounds does not occur. So saying 'it's all sodium chloride' is a drastic over simplification

And nutritional therapies are not about pumping 100,000 mg of every vitamin known to man into the human body. It's much more controlled and studied than that, focussing on detoxing the liver, providing adequate, measured amounts of vitamins that can't be urinated out when in excess amounts, and using tools like high dose intravenous vitamin C as a form of chemo. They also focus on diets high in leafy greens and vegetables, elimination of all crap/toxic foods, acid vs alkaline balance, and lifestyle changes, to name a few more.

It's much more complicated than just 'hey, let's just load this guy up with massive amounts of every vitamin we've got and cross our fingers' Much more effort and scientific study has gone into this than you are giving it credit for. You are applying your simple understanding of it, which is why it seems so stupid to you

Edited by onefatalgoose, 04 August 2012 - 07:15 AM.


#17 onefatalgoose

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 08:43 AM

Also, this is the scar treatment forum. I posted a treatment that another user has reported great success using. Call him a liar, call him an exaggerator, call the whole idea of sea salt soaking alongside exfoliation complete BS. But please do it after you've tried the method for eight weeks (like he did) and received none of the results he received. Discrediting something that could in fact be the answer to issues with scars, without even giving it a chance, is senseless

A damsel in distress has already expressed an interest in this, and just because the idea doesn't sound great to you, doesn't mean others aren't interested. If you have nothing further to offer in regards to personal results using this, why advise others to shy away from it? Sea salt has been proven to increase skin barrier function, and the trace minerals are great for skin. Also exfoliation is much more effective after you've soaked for a period of time, as the surface skin becomes much looser.

There is no danger in trying this, so unless you have disastrous results to report from personal experience, let others (including myself) figure this out by trying it or learning from others experiences

#18 DRaGZ

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 03:41 PM

a bunch of nonsense that I'm too tired to completely reply to


1. No matter how you get vitamin C into your body, it can still only absorb a specific amount of vitamin C per hour because there are many mechanisms in the body designed to regulate this sort of thing. Jesus Christ, do some goddamn research before you continue with this line of reasoning, please, it's getting tiresome.
2. You do realize how much more complex oils are compared to salts, right? Salts just melt, and then turn back nto salt after they cool down. Oils are fatty acids, extremely long chains of tons of different molecules. You can break apart those chains with heat, and they obviously don't work the same way salts do.
3. Misinformation that leads to false hope is the absolute worse thing that any acne scar sufferer can go through. There is no actual evidence anywhere in the entire breadth of scientific research into the study of acne scars that suggests this treatment will do anything useful. Hell, the original thread you posted seemed to suggest that the OP was having success with acne in general, not specifically his scars.
4. I don't want to talk about this stupid megavitamin thing ever again. It's already well-established to have been farcical nonsense, and your continued use of the topic as something akin to cannon fodder for your own arguments makes you sound like a gullible moron. I'd like to think of you as beneath that kind of frivolity, so let's move on.

My problems with you basically boil down to this:

1. You are far too willing to believe anecdotal evidence, either because you are gullible, desperate, or a combination of both. Look, I get it. I understand what you are feeling, because it is what we've all been through on these boards before. And if you want to waste your time with a treatment that will, at the very best, result in some temporary microswelling, then by all means go right ahead if that makes you feel better. But...
2. Don't try and convince us this is going to work when we are all fairly sure that it isn't. Or, worse, don't try to give other gullible people false hope. False hope is devastating, especially when these people truly believed what they were doing was going to work. For many people, acne scars are a debilitating psychological condition as well. Why are you trying to fuck these people up? Do you realize how much snake oil treatments people like us have had shoved into our brains over the years? We're fucking sick of it. We've had enough. We just want to do what actually works and everything else we don't even want to know existed. This is why we are so hostile to your claims, especially when your only arguments are 1. this one guy said it worked, 2. megavitamins and shit, and 3. well it might work. We're sick of it. Just stop.

P.S. Also, next time, just use the EDIT button instead of triple-posting what is essentially the same thing three times.

#19 *Inspired*

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 04:01 PM

I agree with DRaGZ, especially the latter points in his post. Been down the home remedy path. Perhaps, you're just beginning your journey. Scars have affected every aspect of my life, and treating them has been an emotional roller coaster ride. I am still on that ride.

What makes you think I haven't soaked in sea salt? I have done it for 80% of my life. I was raised by a Korean mother in Japan, where they believe in bathing in hot, salt water. They've done it for centuries in Asia. If it was some kind of possible cure for scars, this would be a well-known fact. If you want to try it though, all the power to you. We'll be here when you come to your senses and face reality.

#20 onefatalgoose

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 09:14 AM

The information/research/scientific studies are well documented regarding nutritional therapies, a fraction of which i presented earlier. How you perceive them, as well as the Orthomolecular doctors/researchers peer reviewing the information, is up to you.

Now back to the OP

If you are trying this method of soaking for facial scars, obviously you are going to have to be either submerged in the water, or constantly pouring the water over your face. If you go fully submerged, you can make a breathing tube so you aren't constantly coming back up for air. Or, you can stay under for as long as you hold your breath. So it depends on what you're more comfortable with