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Does Cutting Out Dairy And Sugar Make You More Sensitive To It?

dairy milk acne allergy inflammation theory lactose intolerant

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#1 5ive

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 06:41 PM

From my very basic understanding, the Asian populace, specifically Chinese, are more likely to be lactose intolerant. The question is whether it is due to environmental or genetic factors or a combination of both.

I cut out dairy and sugar quite effectively although I have seen my share of trying times. For instance, I got a new room mate that eats like an 8 year would if they were capable of buying their own groceries (i.e. "fun foods" such as cereal and other high fructose corn syrup treats.) Being human, I have indulged in these confections on the rare occasion.

Well, it has caught up with me. I first noticed the problem after consuming Palak Paneer with yogurt and my stomach did not agree with it. That has never happened before. After testing the waters and consuming dairy a few other times the same thing happened!

I feel as though I developed a greater sensitivity to these foods. I have an inflamed black head on my nose today from bingeing on parmesan cheese. I thought I could get away with it as I have in the past but nope.

I'm wondering if the theory that developing sensitives to food after abstaining from them over a large period of time holds any weight? Does anyone care to shed some light on the topic through personal experience or scholarly articles? I haven't found much online.

#2 Vanbelle

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 06:51 PM

No this is not true. If you believe you have a sensitivity, look into gut repair and reintroducing these foods back in after you have a stronger gut. If you still react negatively, you need to keep away from these foods.

I should add that adjusting macronutrients can cause change in your body's digestive enzyme supply. Suddenly changing this (which people can inadvertently due to "reintroduce foods") can cause a false reaction, say if you eat a ketogenic diet and try to reintroduce a certain starch that contains a relatively large amount of fructose. There's some research that your body's ability to metabolize and break down fructose is also relative to how much you ingest. Suddenly eliminating this could cause a false reaction or seemingly high reactivity to fructose, when you're probably just as malabsorbent as the next guy.

Good luck. :)

Edited by Vanbelle, 15 June 2012 - 07:04 PM.





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