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Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I'm Clear Using The Gut Diet:)

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#601 CK19

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:34 AM

Don't have time to read everyone's post but went to natuorpathin doctor and basically need to fix my gut as well. Just wondering, for those who take probiotics or fish oils or even L-glutamine, did you experience breakouts at the start and if so, how long did those last for?

 

So tough to follow a strict diet during the holiday season ....

 

Thanks.



#602 WishClean

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 03:03 PM

Start with just acidophilus, a few million strands (don't go straight into the billions) if you are worried about breaking out from probiotics. If you notice breakouts from acidophilus, you most likely will breakout from every other probiotic on the market because acidophilus is in most probiotics.

I wouldn't recommend fish oil for leaky gut, at least during initial stages.  

I haven't tried l-glutamine, but I tried l-glutathione several times with good results. First you need to go on the leaky gut diet, then start adding probiotics and/or glutathione-boosting supplements. It makes no sense adding too many supplements while you have leaky gut because your body is incapable of fully absorbing and breaking them down anyway. 

Digestive enzymes might be the most useful supplement to begin with because even if you "cheat" on your diet a little bit, they help break down foods and limit food intolerances. You can take digestive enzymes on an empty stomach too, to promote better digestive health and break down any undigested proteins in your GI tract. 


Edited by WishClean, 26 December 2013 - 03:06 PM.


#603 alternativista

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 05:20 PM

Start with just acidophilus, a few million strands (don't go straight into the billions) if you are worried about breaking out from probiotics. If you notice breakouts from acidophilus, you most likely will breakout from every other probiotic on the market because acidophilus is in most probiotics.

I wouldn't recommend fish oil for leaky gut, at least during initial stages.  

I haven't tried l-glutamine, but I tried l-glutathione several times with good results. First you need to go on the leaky gut diet, then start adding probiotics and/or glutathione-boosting supplements. It makes no sense adding too many supplements while you have leaky gut because your body is incapable of fully absorbing and breaking them down anyway. 

Digestive enzymes might be the most useful supplement to begin with because even if you "cheat" on your diet a little bit, they help break down foods and limit food intolerances. You can take digestive enzymes on an empty stomach too, to promote better digestive health and break down any undigested proteins in your GI tract. 

 

Have you done a lot of research on this?  I need to fix my dog & his skin problems. i left him with my sister for a while and she took him to the vet and they dosed him up on antifungals and anti-biotics at the same time, plus prednisone (which weakens skin in the long run). Plus has been feeding him corn-based dog food. I believed he had a systemic yeast infection caused by the antitiobics he was given to prepare for heartworm treatment. I had started feeding him grain free, raw chicken hearts, coconut oil, safflower oil orally  & topically, plus a supplement with digestive enzymes with baccilus coagulans.   So I plan to feed him grain free, but cooked as he might not have the flora to deal with harmful microorganisms. I have dairy kefir grains I was planning on giving him.  But I don't want to do too much too fast. Do you think I should do bone broths before any probiotics. I'll have to research how safe any mucilaginous plants are for dogs. I'd read that they shouldn't have aloe vera.



#604 CK19

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 12:51 PM

Start with just acidophilus, a few million strands (don't go straight into the billions) if you are worried about breaking out from probiotics. If you notice breakouts from acidophilus, you most likely will breakout from every other probiotic on the market because acidophilus is in most probiotics.

I wouldn't recommend fish oil for leaky gut, at least during initial stages.  

I haven't tried l-glutamine, but I tried l-glutathione several times with good results. First you need to go on the leaky gut diet, then start adding probiotics and/or glutathione-boosting supplements. It makes no sense adding too many supplements while you have leaky gut because your body is incapable of fully absorbing and breaking them down anyway. 

Digestive enzymes might be the most useful supplement to begin with because even if you "cheat" on your diet a little bit, they help break down foods and limit food intolerances. You can take digestive enzymes on an empty stomach too, to promote better digestive health and break down any undigested proteins in your GI tract. 

 

Are there any disgestive enzymes you recommend? Not sure if there are different kinds, etc. How often do you take them a day and do you do it after you "cheat" on food?

 

Also, how long into the diet should I go until I start incorporating probiotics and fish oil omega d3? Wouldn't probiotics speed up the healing?

 

Thanks for your help.



#605 WishClean

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 06:31 PM

I take enzymedica's digest spectrum - they seem to cover all the bases. You have to take digestive enzymes at the beginning of your meal. If you take them on an empty stomach, they have a different function (still useful, but not in terms of digesting your meal). 

I would say 2 weeks to a month into your diet, try acidophilus to see if that helps. I personally can't tolerate fish oil capsules, so I avoid them. Some people have had good results with l-glutamine supplements for gut healing, but I haven't tried those. L-glutathione has helped me with boosting my liver....to me, it was more useful than things like milk thistle, which detox your liver so rapidly that they can cause a nasty detox reaction. 

Other useful supplements/foods you may want to add later on:

- Vitamin C

- Selenium

- sweet potatoes (esp. if you are losing a lot of weight)

- aloe vera juice (for gut healing...do not take every day, only a few times per week on an empty stomach)

Good luck!

Are there any disgestive enzymes you recommend? Not sure if there are different kinds, etc. How often do you take them a day and do you do it after you "cheat" on food?

 

Also, how long into the diet should I go until I start incorporating probiotics and fish oil omega d3? Wouldn't probiotics speed up the healing?

 

Thanks for your help.



#606 WishClean

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:19 AM

Start with just acidophilus, a few million strands (don't go straight into the billions) if you are worried about breaking out from probiotics. If you notice breakouts from acidophilus, you most likely will breakout from every other probiotic on the market because acidophilus is in most probiotics.

I wouldn't recommend fish oil for leaky gut, at least during initial stages.  

I haven't tried l-glutamine, but I tried l-glutathione several times with good results. First you need to go on the leaky gut diet, then start adding probiotics and/or glutathione-boosting supplements. It makes no sense adding too many supplements while you have leaky gut because your body is incapable of fully absorbing and breaking them down anyway. 

Digestive enzymes might be the most useful supplement to begin with because even if you "cheat" on your diet a little bit, they help break down foods and limit food intolerances. You can take digestive enzymes on an empty stomach too, to promote better digestive health and break down any undigested proteins in your GI tract. 

 

Have you done a lot of research on this?  I need to fix my dog & his skin problems. i left him with my sister for a while and she took him to the vet and they dosed him up on antifungals and anti-biotics at the same time, plus prednisone (which weakens skin in the long run). Plus has been feeding him corn-based dog food. I believed he had a systemic yeast infection caused by the antitiobics he was given to prepare for heartworm treatment. I had started feeding him grain free, raw chicken hearts, coconut oil, safflower oil orally  & topically, plus a supplement with digestive enzymes with baccilus coagulans.   So I plan to feed him grain free, but cooked as he might not have the flora to deal with harmful microorganisms. I have dairy kefir grains I was planning on giving him.  But I don't want to do too much too fast. Do you think I should do bone broths before any probiotics. I'll have to research how safe any mucilaginous plants are for dogs. I'd read that they shouldn't have aloe vera.

Digestive enzymes are useful....the probiotics vary though. I found this very useful in relation to histamines...of course, the research is only preliminary but it shows  that not all strands are equal. Bone broths might be good for your dog too, along with the right probiotic. http://thelowhistami...han-raising-it/ <-- this is if your dog has histamine issues. It's good to know which probiotics do not irritate the gut nevertheless. As 

for dog food, I know that Eagle Pack Natural Pet Food is considered a good brand. 

I subscribe to Heal Thyself, and one poster said this about skin allergies for dogs, after asking a vet:

"she said its the protein in the food and not the grain!,,said buy a fish based kibble ,, and give it to the dog for 2 weeks and no other food ,, to see if the allergies clears up ,,then you will know its the meats in the kibble and read on the bag you have been useing and see whats in it .and dont feed them that meat that was in their old food they have been eating"

Does this make sense? Do you think the protein might be the issue rather than grains?



#607 alternativista

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:10 PM


Start with just acidophilus, a few million strands (don't go straight into the billions) if you are worried about breaking out from probiotics. If you notice breakouts from acidophilus, you most likely will breakout from every other probiotic on the market because acidophilus is in most probiotics.
I wouldn't recommend fish oil for leaky gut, at least during initial stages.  
I haven't tried l-glutamine, but I tried l-glutathione several times with good results. First you need to go on the leaky gut diet, then start adding probiotics and/or glutathione-boosting supplements. It makes no sense adding too many supplements while you have leaky gut because your body is incapable of fully absorbing and breaking them down anyway. 
Digestive enzymes might be the most useful supplement to begin with because even if you "cheat" on your diet a little bit, they help break down foods and limit food intolerances. You can take digestive enzymes on an empty stomach too, to promote better digestive health and break down any undigested proteins in your GI tract. 

 
Have you done a lot of research on this?  I need to fix my dog & his skin problems. i left him with my sister for a while and she took him to the vet and they dosed him up on antifungals and anti-biotics at the same time, plus prednisone (which weakens skin in the long run). Plus has been feeding him corn-based dog food. I believed he had a systemic yeast infection caused by the antitiobics he was given to prepare for heartworm treatment. I had started feeding him grain free, raw chicken hearts, coconut oil, safflower oil orally  & topically, plus a supplement with digestive enzymes with baccilus coagulans.   So I plan to feed him grain free, but cooked as he might not have the flora to deal with harmful microorganisms. I have dairy kefir grains I was planning on giving him.  But I don't want to do too much too fast. Do you think I should do bone broths before any probiotics. I'll have to research how safe any mucilaginous plants are for dogs. I'd read that they shouldn't have aloe vera.
Digestive enzymes are useful....the probiotics vary though. I found this very useful in relation to histamines...of course, the research is only preliminary but it shows  that not all strands are equal. Bone broths might be good for your dog too, along with the right probiotic. http://thelowhistami...han-raising-it/ <-- this is if your dog has histamine issues. It's good to know which probiotics do not irritate the gut nevertheless. As 
for dog food, I know that Eagle Pack Natural Pet Food is considered a good brand. 
I subscribe to Heal Thyself, and one poster said this about skin allergies for dogs, after asking a vet:
"she said its the protein in the food and not the grain!,,said buy a fish based kibble ,, and give it to the dog for 2 weeks and no other food ,, to see if the allergies clears up ,,then you will know its the meats in the kibble and read on the bag you have been useing and see whats in it .and dont feed them that meat that was in their old food they have been eating"
Does this make sense? Do you think the protein might be the issue rather than grains?

Only partially. Grains have protein too. Oats and wheat are quite good sources of protein. I have tried avoiding chicken as its not uncommon to be allergic to it. He ate a lamb w/ rice & oats formula for months. I think I've determined he isn't allergic to chicken. Or lamb.

#608 alphaandomega87

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:50 PM

Hi guys, looks like I have the first post of 2014 :)

 

Hmm where should I start. Started with acne since about the age of 13, tried a couple medicines like Bactrim and I forgot the name of the other during my teenage years. I ate like crap of course. At the age of 23 after what felt like a lifetime with Acne I was prescribed Accutane 60 mg for 6 months. Got all the classic side effects, dry skin, achy joints, etc, however I was acne free. About a year later it came back and I did another 6 month course. Fast forward to last year at the age of 25, I started out with a pain in my lower abdomen and constipation, felt like bloating. After several trips to the doctor telling him I felt like my gut was inflamed I was put through the MRI. The doctor said it was a mild case of diverticulitis and that I just needed to up my intake of fiber ::roll eyes::. After much research I have come to realize a couple of things. 

 

1. I have leaky gut syndrome and some form of IBD

2. I have allergies to dust, cats and shellfish, probably also related to my gut health.

3. Bad gut bacteria was probably what caused my acne all those teenage years

4. Accutane might or might have not caused me IBD, could also have been years of bad gut balance. 

5. Regulating my gut has become a mission of mine. 

 

Recently in attempt to figure out what was wrong with me I took up a vegetarian diet on January 2 of this year. Fruits Vegetables and lots of WHEAT. Well about 5 days after eating like this I started with bad flare ups and nausea that continues today. After that incident I continued my research and Eureka. I must be intolerant to either wheat or dairy. I am on day 3 of eating meat eggs, fruit and vegetables (basically)

 

These are my supplements of choice. 

 

Vitamin D

Udo's oil 3-6-9

Slippery elm- for gut healing

Magnesium citrate - for constipation

Inulin -prebiotic

Probiotic 10 strain- 50 billion

Chlorella

 

This regime is still new to me, I realize there will be some discomfort at first, will begin adding fermented food to my diet and cut sugar as much as I can. I will keep you guys updated and any advice is always welcome. 

 

Peace



#609 brandylad

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 06:18 PM

i l

 

Hi guys, looks like I have the first post of 2014 smile.png

 

Hmm where should I start. Started with acne since about the age of 13, tried a couple medicines like Bactrim and I forgot the name of the other during my teenage years. I ate like crap of course. At the age of 23 after what felt like a lifetime with Acne I was prescribed Accutane 60 mg for 6 months. Got all the classic side effects, dry skin, achy joints, etc, however I was acne free. About a year later it came back and I did another 6 month course. Fast forward to last year at the age of 25, I started out with a pain in my lower abdomen and constipation, felt like bloating. After several trips to the doctor telling him I felt like my gut was inflamed I was put through the MRI. The doctor said it was a mild case of diverticulitis and that I just needed to up my intake of fiber ::roll eyes::. After much research I have come to realize a couple of things. 

 

1. I have leaky gut syndrome and some form of IBD

2. I have allergies to dust, cats and shellfish, probably also related to my gut health.

3. Bad gut bacteria was probably what caused my acne all those teenage years

4. Accutane might or might have not caused me IBD, could also have been years of bad gut balance. 

5. Regulating my gut has become a mission of mine. 

 

Recently in attempt to figure out what was wrong with me I took up a vegetarian diet on January 2 of this year. Fruits Vegetables and lots of WHEAT. Well about 5 days after eating like this I started with bad flare ups and nausea that continues today. After that incident I continued my research and Eureka. I must be intolerant to either wheat or dairy. I am on day 3 of eating meat eggs, fruit and vegetables (basically)

 

These are my supplements of choice. 

 

Vitamin D

Udo's oil 3-6-9

Slippery elm- for gut healing

Magnesium citrate - for constipation

Inulin -prebiotic

Probiotic 10 strain- 50 billion

Chlorella

 

This regime is still new to me, I realize there will be some discomfort at first, will begin adding fermented food to my diet and cut sugar as much as I can. I will keep you guys updated and any advice is always welcome. 

 

Peace

 

i like you have pet allergies, taking probiotics made the allergies to cats go away, however i broke out horrendously and my skin is still suffering because of it... hopefully your experience is more positive :) hopefully that serves as confirmation you can cure allergies through fixing your gut



#610 alphaandomega87

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 10:55 AM

Thanks for the response Brandy. Does anyone else here use Inulin? I found this from the author of gutsense.com

 

  • Inulin is a known allergen reported in The New England Journal of Medicine in connection to anaphylaxis, a deadly shock. Also, inulin is a fructan—fructose polymer. Fructose and other fructans cause malabsorption of nutrients in 30% to 40% of individuals, and they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). That's not surprising—after all inulin is a potent laxative, known to cause diarrhea. And what usually follows diarrhea? Constipation, of course. In addition to bloating, flatulence and abdominal cramps caused by fermentation of inulin, alternating patterns of diarrhea and constipation is a dead-on accurate description of IBS's primary symptoms.



#611 WishClean

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 12:46 PM

Another thing you should be doing is boosting your glutathione production. Some people try to take l-glutamine supplements to help with that (glutamine converts to glutathione if your body is able to convert it), but I just went with l-glutathione instead because I was suspecting that I couldn't convert it in a different form. Glutamine can break some people out, but I never heard of anyone breaking out from glutathione. Glutathione is also used in cosmetics for anti-aging and skin whitening. 



#612 alphaandomega87

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:05 PM

I wanted to add glutamine to my diet, but I am allergic to shellfish. I have seen vegetarian glutamine however



#613 youknow1

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:07 PM

Another thing you should be doing is boosting your glutathione production. Some people try to take l-glutamine supplements to help with that (glutamine converts to glutathione if your body is able to convert it), but I just went with l-glutathione instead because I was suspecting that I couldn't convert it in a different form. Glutamine can break some people out, but I never heard of anyone breaking out from glutathione. Glutathione is also used in cosmetics for anti-aging and skin whitening. 

Taking l-glutathione is useless, you have to take N-acetyl cysteine to increase glutathione in body.



#614 WishClean

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:11 PM

Another thing you should be doing is boosting your glutathione production. Some people try to take l-glutamine supplements to help with that (glutamine converts to glutathione if your body is able to convert it), but I just went with l-glutathione instead because I was suspecting that I couldn't convert it in a different form. Glutamine can break some people out, but I never heard of anyone breaking out from glutathione. Glutathione is also used in cosmetics for anti-aging and skin whitening. 

Taking l-glutathione is useless, you have to take N-acetyl cysteine to increase glutathione in body.

Not necessarily. I personally saw results from l-glutathione, that's why I don't think it's fair to dismiss it. It has to be in REDUCED form (written on the label) in order to be bioavailable.



#615 alphaandomega87

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:44 AM

I have been on my diet only a few days and I can already feel vast improvement at least with gas and bloaty feelings in my gut. I bought Miso, Sauerkraut, Kombucha yesterday. I don't want to get my hopes up, but it seems like carbs were causing my flare ups for 6 months. Still no carb flu. Hope its easy sailing from here.



#616 alphaandomega87

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:48 PM

would anyone recommend a cleanse for me at this time, or should I settle into my diet first
 
 
Actually more interested in the Liver and Kidney flush mentioned in the article than the bowel cleanse

Edited by alphaandomega87, 18 January 2014 - 12:49 PM.


#617 CK19

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 12:42 AM

For those on a diet to heal leaky gut, how long before you saw results? As in, did you stop having breakouts right when you stopped eating food that you were allergic (intolerant) to, or did breakouts continue but took a week or so before they stopped?



#618 alphaandomega87

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:25 AM

Cant say for breakouts as my skin is clear. But I have been having stomach issues also relating to allergens such as wheat and gluten and my symptoms have almost disappeared in 5 days. Should tell you something about the effectiveness of proper diet. Give it a shot and stick to it until you see results. 



#619 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:22 PM

Just came across some reasons/claims that increasing permeability can be a good thing.  From an article about chickweed. A common weed that is very nutritious, medicinal,  but also contains saponins.

 

"Chickweed contains soapy substances, called saponins. Saponins, like soap, emulsify and increase the permeability of cellular membranes. When we consume chickweed those saponins increase our ability to absorb nutrients, especially minerals. They also dissolve and break down unwanted matter, including disease-causing bacteria, cysts, benign tumors, thickened mucus in the respiratory and digestive systems, and excess fat cells"

 

read on if you want to learn mre about breaking down fat cells.  And topical uses in which what I would have guessed to be harmful properties are good things.

 

http://www.susunweed.com/Article_Chickweed-A-Star.htm 

 

So, are some people's guts not permeable enough?






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