Jump to content

Photo

Gut Flora And Leaky Gut. After 5 Years I Finally Found The Root Cause And I'm Clear Using The Gut Diet:)

calcium gluten paleo candida probiotic

618 replies to this topic

#521 outofoptions

outofoptions

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 40
    Likes: 7
About Me
  • Joined: 23-August 11

Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:14 AM

Well it's been about 3 months now of being on this program. My skin has been breaking out quite a bit the past few weeks, not sure whats going on. I think my skin looked the best during the first 2 weeks of doing this. Only thing I noticed positive is I have no more white film on my tongue. Just noticed the other day. Not sure if that really even means anything at all.

Still eating no starches or fruits. Just fats, meat, and fiberous veggies. Main problem is I am just losing WAAAY too much weight. My bodyfat is much lower than I would like, especially since its winter and I'm freezing my ass off.

I told myself I'd give this at least 4 months, so hopefully I'll some improvement soon. Still taking lots of probiotic and prebiotic sources like water kefit, coconut milk kefir w/ inulin, cultured veggies, and probiotic supplement. Wish I had better news to report, but I'll update in another month.

#522 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:39 AM

Well it's been about 3 months now of being on this program. My skin has been breaking out quite a bit the past few weeks, not sure whats going on. I think my skin looked the best during the first 2 weeks of doing this. Only thing I noticed positive is I have no more white film on my tongue. Just noticed the other day. Not sure if that really even means anything at all.

Still eating no starches or fruits. Just fats, meat, and fiberous veggies. Main problem is I am just losing WAAAY too much weight. My bodyfat is much lower than I would like, especially since its winter and I'm freezing my ass off.

I told myself I'd give this at least 4 months, so hopefully I'll some improvement soon. Still taking lots of probiotic and prebiotic sources like water kefit, coconut milk kefir w/ inulin, cultured veggies, and probiotic supplement. Wish I had better news to report, but I'll update in another month.


Stay with it, you should be through the worst ups and downs and slowly start to improve at this point.

Do you have any gastrointestinal issues or do you feel fine on the diet+probiotics and prebiotics?
If you are losing weight, just add more grass-fed butter, extra virgin olive oil, virgin coconut oil and other fat sources into your diet:)

Edited by White Fox, 06 December 2012 - 10:40 AM.


#523 outofoptions

outofoptions

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 40
    Likes: 7
About Me
  • Joined: 23-August 11

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:30 AM

I have absolutely no GI issues whatsoever. No bloating, gas, anything like that. BMs are frequent and healthy.

I know I need to eat more, just a matter of finding the appetite. Carbs are just so much easier to eat lots of for me than fats.

#524 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 752
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the South
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:19 PM

White Fox, do you know anything about this good yeast/bad yeast stuff? I thought water kefir was a good probiotic but now I keep hearing how it's a yeast and will feed candida, etc. There were some people arguing on another forum and half of them were saying any fermented food with yeast (which is I guess, most of them?) should be avoided with leaky gut, and the other half were saying no, they are "good yeast" and will kill candida!" it's soooo confusing.

I assume you think the yeasts in fermented foods are good and will slowly kill candida, not the opposite, right?

I'm just breaking out so badly right now and want to push on and believe I'm doing the right thing, but it's hard when people tell you not to eat fermented foods.

#525 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 752
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the South
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:40 PM

Okay, I think I understand where I went wrong now, and it's what kaleidoscope was saying a page back. Kefir does have a lot of yeast. So does kombucha. And it is "good" yeast (not candida). But I went back and read the gutflora.com page again and I see that I was supposed to introduce this stuff in a certain order and instead of starting with the probiotic supplement and fermented dairy (maybe not dairy for me since they say to avoid your allergy foods), I started with the yeasty-est one possible!

I read that sauerkraut is more of a "bacterial" probiotic than a yeasty one. So that makes sense why I've seen some improvements when I've added sauerkraut on top of the kefir. It was balancing it a bit. So basically I need to pull back a little on the kefir (maybe 1 glass a day and not 3), keep the kimchi and saurkraut the same, and add more of the bacteria (supplement)and hopefully that will balance things.

I just bought a good quality probiotic supplement. So I'll finally be getting some acidophilis in me. Hopefully that will be the boost I need to get this under control.

Edited by dejaclairevoyant, 06 December 2012 - 01:41 PM.


#526 Jekester

Jekester

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 210
    Likes: 4
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 08-November 12

Posted 06 December 2012 - 04:06 PM

I found out I have a leaky gut a few weeks ago from a test they did... a lot of this information is overwhelming here :S Should I just stick to do what my nutritionist is telling me to do? And I dunno if this has been answered or anything, but on average, how long does it take for the gut to heal and my body to start clearing up my acne?

Also will stress every now and then each day stop me from my gut healing? if yes, what do you recommend I do?

Hate to re-post this, but I was just wondering if anyone could help with this? thanks :)

#527 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 07 December 2012 - 06:13 AM

I have absolutely no GI issues whatsoever. No bloating, gas, anything like that. BMs are frequent and healthy.

I know I need to eat more, just a matter of finding the appetite. Carbs are just so much easier to eat lots of for me than fats.


That's great!
Add some butter to your meat and eggs, or olive oil.

White Fox, do you know anything about this good yeast/bad yeast stuff? I thought water kefir was a good probiotic but now I keep hearing how it's a yeast and will feed candida, etc. There were some people arguing on another forum and half of them were saying any fermented food with yeast (which is I guess, most of them?) should be avoided with leaky gut, and the other half were saying no, they are "good yeast" and will kill candida!" it's soooo confusing.

I assume you think the yeasts in fermented foods are good and will slowly kill candida, not the opposite, right?

I'm just breaking out so badly right now and want to push on and believe I'm doing the right thing, but it's hard when people tell you not to eat fermented foods.

Several microorganisms are involved in the fermentation of for example kefir and sauerkraut, including certain fungal species. Not all yeasts are bad, and the ones you find in naturally fermented foods will help you heal.


I found out I have a leaky gut a few weeks ago from a test they did... a lot of this information is overwhelming here :S Should I just stick to do what my nutritionist is telling me to do? And I dunno if this has been answered or anything, but on average, how long does it take for the gut to heal and my body to start clearing up my acne?

Also will stress every now and then each day stop me from my gut healing? if yes, what do you recommend I do?

Hate to re-post this, but I was just wondering if anyone could help with this? thanks Posted Image


Definitely don't follow what your nutritionist has told you, which is most likely plenty of grains etc?

It doesn't have to be overwhelming, just follow the gut diet!

Edited by White Fox, 07 December 2012 - 06:14 AM.


#528 Jekester

Jekester

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 210
    Likes: 4
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 08-November 12

Posted 08 December 2012 - 06:49 PM


I have absolutely no GI issues whatsoever. No bloating, gas, anything like that. BMs are frequent and healthy.

I know I need to eat more, just a matter of finding the appetite. Carbs are just so much easier to eat lots of for me than fats.


That's great!
Add some butter to your meat and eggs, or olive oil.

White Fox, do you know anything about this good yeast/bad yeast stuff? I thought water kefir was a good probiotic but now I keep hearing how it's a yeast and will feed candida, etc. There were some people arguing on another forum and half of them were saying any fermented food with yeast (which is I guess, most of them?) should be avoided with leaky gut, and the other half were saying no, they are "good yeast" and will kill candida!" it's soooo confusing.

I assume you think the yeasts in fermented foods are good and will slowly kill candida, not the opposite, right?

I'm just breaking out so badly right now and want to push on and believe I'm doing the right thing, but it's hard when people tell you not to eat fermented foods.

Several microorganisms are involved in the fermentation of for example kefir and sauerkraut, including certain fungal species. Not all yeasts are bad, and the ones you find in naturally fermented foods will help you heal.


I found out I have a leaky gut a few weeks ago from a test they did... a lot of this information is overwhelming here :S Should I just stick to do what my nutritionist is telling me to do? And I dunno if this has been answered or anything, but on average, how long does it take for the gut to heal and my body to start clearing up my acne?

Also will stress every now and then each day stop me from my gut healing? if yes, what do you recommend I do?

Hate to re-post this, but I was just wondering if anyone could help with this? thanks Posted Image


Definitely don't follow what your nutritionist has told you, which is most likely plenty of grains etc?

It doesn't have to be overwhelming, just follow the gut diet!


She told me stick away from grains, dairy, gluten and a lot of other things. Basically said to eat a lot of protein, a limited amount of carbs and gave me a lot of supplements such as B complex, vitamin c etc and NOT to have sugar or anything like that.

#529 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 09 December 2012 - 04:16 AM

She told me stick away from grains, dairy, gluten and a lot of other things. Basically said to eat a lot of protein, a limited amount of carbs and gave me a lot of supplements such as B complex, vitamin c etc and NOT to have sugar or anything like that.


Those supplements are most likely a waste of time. If you eat according to the gut diet you will get the vitamins and minerals you need.
And fat should be your primary source of energy, not protein.

Good luck:)

#530 rentedname

rentedname

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 123
    Likes: 9
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Joined: 10-August 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:01 AM

white fox, how bad was your acne and digestion exactly? i'm seeing a lot of people getting no results or worse on this diet, myself included, and only people who had mild acne cleared up. what's going on?

#531 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:08 AM

white fox, how bad was your acne and digestion exactly? i'm seeing a lot of people getting no results or worse on this diet, myself included, and only people who had mild acne cleared up. what's going on?


My acne was severe, and I had several food intolerances. I I haven't heard of 1 person that hasn't gotten the results I promised.
I've always said that you have to follow the diet for several months, adjust to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and get rid of food intolerances before you will see results. Those people I have been in contacted with that are getting close to this stage are seeing good results.

I've never claimed that this treatment is anything else than it is, a treatment of the root problem that will take time and persistance.

#532 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 752
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the South
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:12 PM

I started in early October, just for anyone who is tracking my progress. So I'm already over 2 months in.

At this point I'm just leaving my skin alone and trying to forget about it for the most part. Just for my emotional health. So all I'm doing is washing my face with organic soap, putting some witch hazel on really red and inflamed areas, and moisturizing with healthy oils.

I'm waiting on my probiotic to get shipped. It should arrive any day now. I'll update if any changes happen.

#533 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:59 AM

My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.

Edited by White Fox, 12 December 2012 - 04:01 AM.


#534 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,458
    Likes: 1,065
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 12 December 2012 - 07:49 AM

I started in early October, just for anyone who is tracking my progress. So I'm already over 2 months in.

At this point I'm just leaving my skin alone and trying to forget about it for the most part. Just for my emotional health. So all I'm doing is washing my face with organic soap, putting some witch hazel on really red and inflamed areas, and moisturizing with healthy oils.

I'm waiting on my probiotic to get shipped. It should arrive any day now. I'll update if any changes happen.


Can you use aloe Vera?

#535 tim12

tim12

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,261
    Likes: 332
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:I enjoy short walks on the beach.
  • Joined: 11-December 10

Achievements

     

Posted 12 December 2012 - 10:21 AM

My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.


Could you define adjust, particularly with some of the current studies behind the gut theory that many of the proponents cite? I've come across some things like type 1 diabetes having a potential link with leaky gut, but I'd like to see what else is out there. I'm most interested in this idea that food sensitivities can go away. what about genuine allergies?


A sort of update:

I've been upping my probiotics for the same amount of time (water kefir, coconut milk kefir, kraut, kimchi). I found that if my skin was in a sort of negative type cycle, fermented dairy only prolonged or worsened my breakouts, despite it being the "ideal" type recommended by many pro-dairy cohorts -- raw pastured grass fed goat milk. Interestingly, the premade kefir from a similar goat farm actually doesn't seem to give me problems than the other kefir. It did have strains different than just regular kefir alone, and it tasted better.

#536 White Fox

White Fox

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 716
    Likes: 26
About Me
  • Joined: 09-October 07

Posted 12 December 2012 - 11:04 AM


My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.


Could you define adjust, particularly with some of the current studies behind the gut theory that many of the proponents cite? I've come across some things like type 1 diabetes having a potential link with leaky gut, but I'd like to see what else is out there. I'm most interested in this idea that food sensitivities can go away. what about genuine allergies?


A sort of update:

I've been upping my probiotics for the same amount of time (water kefir, coconut milk kefir, kraut, kimchi). I found that if my skin was in a sort of negative type cycle, fermented dairy only prolonged or worsened my breakouts, despite it being the "ideal" type recommended by many pro-dairy cohorts -- raw pastured grass fed goat milk. Interestingly, the premade kefir from a similar goat farm actually doesn't seem to give me problems than the other kefir. It did have strains different than just regular kefir alone, and it tasted better.


I've posted several links in the first post and thoughout my posts:)

#537 tim12

tim12

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,261
    Likes: 332
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:I enjoy short walks on the beach.
  • Joined: 11-December 10

Achievements

     

Posted 12 December 2012 - 11:50 AM



My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.


Could you define adjust, particularly with some of the current studies behind the gut theory that many of the proponents cite? I've come across some things like type 1 diabetes having a potential link with leaky gut, but I'd like to see what else is out there. I'm most interested in this idea that food sensitivities can go away. what about genuine allergies?


A sort of update:

I've been upping my probiotics for the same amount of time (water kefir, coconut milk kefir, kraut, kimchi). I found that if my skin was in a sort of negative type cycle, fermented dairy only prolonged or worsened my breakouts, despite it being the "ideal" type recommended by many pro-dairy cohorts -- raw pastured grass fed goat milk. Interestingly, the premade kefir from a similar goat farm actually doesn't seem to give me problems than the other kefir. It did have strains different than just regular kefir alone, and it tasted better.


I've posted several links in the first post and thoughout my posts:)


I've seen them, but the links and studies only talk about lactose intolerance being alleviated or improved for some people. What about other foods though? I don't see anything about sensitivities, allergies, and the like for other foods. I see postulated mechanisms where gut bacteria would play a role, but the only studies I see are about lactose intolerance. Dr. Ayers does have some commentary gliadin, transglutaminase, the immune system, flora, etc; but I'm looking for specific studies where this mechanism is demonstrated and improved by altering gut flora in a study.

Celiac is not a Typical Food Intolerance
Celiac is a complex interaction between major toxic proteins in wheat (gliadin), detox gut enzyme (tissue transglutaminase, tTg) and antibodies. Gliadin is a wheat protein adapted to attack the intestines of herbivores. Herbivores, such as insects and humans, can in turn protect themselves from gliadin and other polyglutamine proteins with the enzyme transglutaminase. tTg binds to glutamines in gliadin and converts them to glutamic acids. Unfortunately, while the gliadin is bound to the tTg, inflammation can predispose the gut to present these proteins to the immune system for processing to trigger antibody production. This is the start of the autoimmune disease.

The major histocompatibility antigens (MHAs) code for the proteins that display fragments of proteins on cell surfaces for antigen presentation and immune response. There is a lot of MHA variation and evolutionary adaptation. Some MHAs favor antibody production to gliadin and tTg. This just shows that celiac and grain/gluten intolerance is not a typical food intolerance, which will be remedied by simply altering gut bacteria, even though establishing gut bacteria that metabolize gliadin or that reduce autoimmunity, may be part of the cure.


http://coolinginflam...ood intolerance




EDIT:

Did some digging myself.

The administration of the bacterial strain to rats fed gliadins seemed to ameliorate the inflammation caused by gliadin feeding alone, although, in sensitized animals the co-administration of B. longum had less marked effects, which was probably due to the more extensive intestinal mucosal damage.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23023000


Compared to IEC-6 cells exposed to intact gliadins extracted from the chemically acidified dough (control), VSL#3 pre-digested gliadins caused a less pronounced reorganization of the intracellular F-actin which was mirrored by an attenuated effect on intestinal mucosa permeability. The release of zonulin from intestinal epithelial cells treated with gliadins was considerably lower when digested with VSL#3.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....iadin probiotic

These findings indicate that B. longum attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines and the CD4+ T-cell mediated immune response in an animal model of gliadin-induced enteropathy.


Even though there's some immunomodulation exhibited by the probiotic, interestingly ...

The possible translocation of the bacterium to different organs was determined by plate counting and the composition of the colonic microbiota was quantified by real-time PCR ... The bifidobacterial strain administered represented between 75-95% of the total bifidobacteria isolated from all treated groups, and translocation to organs was not detected.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22348021

Gluten sensitivity was established by feeding three generations of BALB/c mice a gluten-free diet (G-) followed by gluten challenge (G+) for 30 days. The G+ mice developed villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and infiltration of T cells and macrophages in the small intestine. Inflammation was associated with an overexpression of CD71 on the apical side of enterocytes and an increase of plasma cells producing IgA, which colocalised with the CD71. Moreover, IgA colocalised with the transglutaminase 2 (TG2), the production of which was increased in the lamina propria of G+ mice. These mice displayed increased production of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), pro-inflammatory cytokines and IL-15, as well as anti-gliadin and anti-TG2 autoantibodies. The commensal flora-isolated presumptive probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii KK1 strain hydrolysed the 28-kDa α-gliadin fraction, and its oral delivery in G+ mice improved enteropathy development in association with decrease of epithelial cell CD71 expression and local cytokine production.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22330344


I'm wondering if there's any studies in humans similar to the rat studies. I'll do some digging for those at a later time. I'll also see if I can get my hands on the full article, to see the specifics about the probiotics (dosing, strains, etc).

Edited by tim12, 12 December 2012 - 12:34 PM.


#538 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 752
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the South
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:24 PM

My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.


I think the problem some of us are having with this (only speaking for myself) is that it's frustrating to read things like "get rid of your intolerances," or "achieve regular bowel movements" as if these are things we can just do. I've been on the healing path for years now. I've been hoping and praying for years that my healthy diet will heal my gut and improve food intolerances and thus far, my food intolerances have only gotten worse. I'm not sure how much of that is mental (anxiety disorder and being very stressed over eating) and granted, I've never taken the probiotics route until now, but it's still frustrating.

I still haven't achieved regular bowel movements again since starting this program. I'm praying that the addition of a high-quality probiotic supp will help with that, but I'm really scared it will block me up again.

Anyway I'm not attacking you or anything, just expressing how frustrating it is. I wish I could 100% believe you that this works. But SO many people over SO many years have promised me things are going to work for my acne, from colon cleansing to fasting to herbs to diets to mental work... and here I sit, with painful cystic acne all over... I think the fear for myself and others is to put a long time into this and still not see any results. It scares me seeing people say that they did probiotics and the gut diet for months and months and still have bad acne. All I can pray is that they did something wrong and I will do something right and finally heal.

#539 kaleidoscope

kaleidoscope

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,490
    Likes: 3
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Joined: 05-April 05

Posted 13 December 2012 - 02:41 PM


My whole point is that it doesn't matter how long you have been on the diet if you still haven't adjusted to several sources of probiotics and prebiotics and/or still have gastrointestinal problems or food intolerances. Because then you still have a lot of inflammation going on and your acne will not improve.


I think the problem some of us are having with this (only speaking for myself) is that it's frustrating to read things like "get rid of your intolerances," or "achieve regular bowel movements" as if these are things we can just do.


I agree... I don't think anyone can say that any one protocol will accomplish those things for everyone who has food allergies or digestive issues. There are so many factors and everyone is different.

For example, I started the Specific Carbohydrate Diet several years ago in hopes clearing up my skin. As part of this diet, I started eating lots of homemade yogurt, as well as sauerkraut (actually I'd been eating sauerkraut for a long time). This diet did clear me up a few months or so, but eventually I started breaking out again... and I also started developing severe food allergies (IgE allergies, bordering on anaphylactic) for the first time in my life. And all the foods I was becoming seriously allergic to started breaking my skin out even though they never had before. Why would this happen to me on this "gut-healing" protocol? Well, I later figured out that I had mercury toxicity, which causes allergies, and all of the high-sulfur foods I was eating on the SCD were exacerbating the problem (sulfur binds to mercury and can move it around the body, which is generally not a good thing). So it's not that simple for some people.

In general, treating yeast and bacterial imbalances in the gut can reduce food allergies/sensitivities, but still, not everyone will benefit from the exact same treatment for these problems. I couldn't even tolerate any probiotics at all until I started taking a supplement that boosts the immune system (something called OKG), which really reduced my yeast and bacterial overgrowth issues.

#540 dejaclairevoyant

dejaclairevoyant

    ~clean body, beautiful life~

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,599
    Likes: 752
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the South
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:09 AM

I probably have mercury toxicity because my mom ingested mercury as a child. She never did any sort of detox for it and I'm sure some of it probably went into my body as I was her firstborn child. I hope that my diet has naturally detoxed me over the years some. I don't know how to face trying to detox it because every time I've read anything about it, it sounds really confusing. A lot of sources say to be careful trying to detox it as a lot of the protocols loosen it up and move it around the body but don't actually get it out.

How did you find out for sure that you had it?




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users