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When Can I Expect To See Results On A Gluten-Free Diet?

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#1 WildGo0se

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 09:27 PM

So I started a gluten-free diet last Sunday (however, on Monday, I accidentally ate a tiny piece of meatball that I thought was sausage). Since then, though, I haven't had any gluten to my knowledge.

I'm still breaking out. Not in huge clusters, but a few pimples in various areas on my face (I have what I think is moderately severe acne). Some people have reported that their acne ceased as soon as they cut out gluten; others saw improvement after weeks or months. What has been everyone's experience?

I have not yet cut out dairy, but I'm going to soon. I did eliminate it back in January for a month, but saw no change in my acne.

Even though my acne is pretty much the same, I did notice almost immediately after cutting out gluten that I have more energy, less anxiety/depressive feelings, less social awkwardness, more endurance during and motivation for exercise... I'm definitely not going back to eating it.

I guess I'm just curious about others' experiences and stories about removing gluten from their diet. When did you guys see improvement in your skin?

#2 arqa22

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 12:32 AM

if gluten is the ONLY trigger for you then once you stop gluten you should never develop new pimples.

at least thats the way it goes for me.....

Edited by arqa22, 18 May 2012 - 12:39 AM.


#3 overfl00d

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 12:45 AM

You cut out all grains? Which includes oatmeal, rice, whole wheat, pancakes, ect? I cut out gluten and my skin improved tons. I also stopped dairy too. Are you eating any starches like white potatoes or peas? Those can be problematic too.

I also started supplementing with the 90 essential vitamins and minerals our body's need. I have this great product if you're interested.
Lots of water and protein too.

You'll have to make a diary and record everything. You could be reacting to something else like soy, eggs, nuts, or something else.

Good luck!

Edited by overfl00d, 18 May 2012 - 12:46 AM.


#4 arqa22

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 01:01 AM

You cut out all grains? Which includes oatmeal, rice, whole wheat, pancakes, ect? I cut out gluten and my skin improved tons. I also stopped dairy too. Are you eating any starches like white potatoes or peas? Those can be problematic too.

I also started supplementing with the 90 essential vitamins and minerals our body's need. I have this great product if you're interested.
Lots of water and protein too.

You'll have to make a diary and record everything. You could be reacting to something else like soy, eggs, nuts, or something else.

Good luck!



why potatoes are a problem?

#5 overfl00d

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 01:15 AM


You cut out all grains? Which includes oatmeal, rice, whole wheat, pancakes, ect? I cut out gluten and my skin improved tons. I also stopped dairy too. Are you eating any starches like white potatoes or peas? Those can be problematic too.

I also started supplementing with the 90 essential vitamins and minerals our body's need. I have this great product if you're interested.
Lots of water and protein too.

You'll have to make a diary and record everything. You could be reacting to something else like soy, eggs, nuts, or something else.

Good luck!



why potatoes are a problem?


Potatoes are really high in the GI index and your body turns the starchy carbohydrates into sugar. A good alternative to white potatoes is sweet potatoes. Much healthier and tastier in my opinion. :)

#6 alternativista

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:08 AM

Potatoes also contain a lectin that Harms the digestive tract in the same way gluten does, just to a lesser extent. The same is true of many of the grains used in gluten free processed foods.

And we can't tell you when you will see results.

#7 Oberyn

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:47 AM

Acne DOES NOT depend on diet and food.
I've seen multiple national and international-level dermatologists during my 8 years of nodule-cystic acne and seborrheic skin, and they all told me the same thing.
You can eat what you want, don't waste time like this. Don't listen to the crappy vodoo and grandma's advices about chocolate and food and stuff.
Go to a decent dermatologist and if your situation allows he will prescribe you the right regimen of drugs. Granted that NOTHING works like oral antibiotics, and, most of all, Roaccutan.

#8 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:54 AM

A few things...

First, you have to be 100% sure you got ALL gluten out of your diet. There is a steep learning curve with this, although you may have it easier doing it nowdays than I did back in 07/08. Awareness has drastically increased in that short time--but still, there is a lot of hidden gluten in things. You'll want to look into every single package of processed food (I had to call company hotlines a lot), every vitamin and supplement you take, and also learn signs of hidden gluten (things like autolyzed yeast extract, msg, or other things that are in processed foods can be gluten). Sometimes there is something that says nothing on the label but contains gluten anyway.

Because of all of the above it took me about a year to actually be gluten free and it was a painstaking process, trying so hard and constantly getting it in my system by accident again and again. I'll give you an example: Lays potato chips. They say nothing on the label, or they might even say gluten free but unfortunately they are made on the same lines as gluten products and can therefore have a ton of gluten on them.

Your best bet is to avoid all processed foods for a bit, and that way you can know for sure you are 100% free and see how your body is doing. There's no point in an experiment if it isn't a controlled experiment.

Secondly, as someone else mentioned, you also won't have a controlled experiment if you are reacting to other foods as well. I had huge improvements going off gluten but it turned out (found this out after another year or so) that I was also reacting to dairy, corn, and soy. So it might be a good idea to cut these or anything you might suspect is a trigger for you out all at once, then see how clear you get, then test things one by one to figure out exact sensitivities. Also other sensitivities can appear or worsen after initially going off gluten *(what happened to me and what has apparently happened to a lot of people over at the celiac disease forums) so you might get clear for awhile and then discover another sensitivity. But worry about that later.

All in all, when I actually was able to remove all gluten, I'd say I saw noticeable improvements within a week, major improvements or clearing entirely within a month.

#9 alternativista

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:57 AM

Acne DOES NOT depend on diet and food.
I've seen multiple national and international-level dermatologists during my 8 years of nodule-cystic acne and seborrheic skin, and they all told me the same thing.
You can eat what you want, don't waste time like this. Don't listen to the crappy vodoo and grandma's advices about chocolate and food and stuff.
Go to a decent dermatologist and if your situation allows he will prescribe you the right regimen of drugs. Granted that NOTHING works like oral antibiotics, and, most of all, Roaccutan.


Those derms are wrong and need to go back to school. Or at least start reading their trade journals and keep up with research demonstrating diet/nutrient and acne connections that actually goes back decades.

And I saw many derms too. And took all their antibiotics and other drugs including 2 courses of accutane. None of wich helped. Diet changes, on the other hand, cleared my skin in a very short time and has kept me clear for years.

We do not have acne or any other health problem because of a lack of drugs. It's a lack of healthy diet and lifestyle habits.

And eating right is never a waste of time. It retards aging and prevents, reduces, and even reverses most of the health problems this culture of sickly people suffers from. Lifestyle caused diseases like diabetes are now the fastest growing diseases in history.

#10 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 08:01 AM

Yeah thank god I never listened to derms or I'd probably be ten billion dollars in debt by now, and still have peeling irritated skin from all the harsh chemical creams they gave me. And still have skin problems!

#11 WildGo0se

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 08:48 AM

Acne DOES NOT depend on diet and food.
I've seen multiple national and international-level dermatologists during my 8 years of nodule-cystic acne and seborrheic skin, and they all told me the same thing.
You can eat what you want, don't waste time like this. Don't listen to the crappy vodoo and grandma's advices about chocolate and food and stuff.
Go to a decent dermatologist and if your situation allows he will prescribe you the right regimen of drugs. Granted that NOTHING works like oral antibiotics, and, most of all, Roaccutan.


Yeah, I went through two rounds of Accutane back in 2005 to 2006. I don't even know why it was prescribed to me, as my acne was so mild then. Now it's moderately severe. Accutane really does work, doesn't it?!

A few things...

First, you have to be 100% sure you got ALL gluten out of your diet. There is a steep learning curve with this, although you may have it easier doing it nowdays than I did back in 07/08. Awareness has drastically increased in that short time--but still, there is a lot of hidden gluten in things. You'll want to look into every single package of processed food (I had to call company hotlines a lot), every vitamin and supplement you take, and also learn signs of hidden gluten (things like autolyzed yeast extract, msg, or other things that are in processed foods can be gluten). Sometimes there is something that says nothing on the label but contains gluten anyway.

Because of all of the above it took me about a year to actually be gluten free and it was a painstaking process, trying so hard and constantly getting it in my system by accident again and again. I'll give you an example: Lays potato chips. They say nothing on the label, or they might even say gluten free but unfortunately they are made on the same lines as gluten products and can therefore have a ton of gluten on them.

Your best bet is to avoid all processed foods for a bit, and that way you can know for sure you are 100% free and see how your body is doing. There's no point in an experiment if it isn't a controlled experiment.

Secondly, as someone else mentioned, you also won't have a controlled experiment if you are reacting to other foods as well. I had huge improvements going off gluten but it turned out (found this out after another year or so) that I was also reacting to dairy, corn, and soy. So it might be a good idea to cut these or anything you might suspect is a trigger for you out all at once, then see how clear you get, then test things one by one to figure out exact sensitivities. Also other sensitivities can appear or worsen after initially going off gluten *(what happened to me and what has apparently happened to a lot of people over at the celiac disease forums) so you might get clear for awhile and then discover another sensitivity. But worry about that later.

All in all, when I actually was able to remove all gluten, I'd say I saw noticeable improvements within a week, major improvements or clearing entirely within a month.


Thank you so much for taking the time to write this. :) Yeah, yesterday I went to a pizza place that made gluten-free pizza, so I tried it. It was a bad idea. Ever since I ate it, I felt my anxiety creeping back (not over eating it, just general anxiety). I had been feeling great for days off gluten, but I think that pizza might have had cross-contamination. I also have a few extra pimples than I had been getting.

I think I'm going to stick to keeping my diet really basic, eating mostly protein and fruits and vegetables. But I'm wondering if I should cut out ALL grains, such as rice and oatmeal? I lose weight really easily, so I'm trying to find a good balance to gain weight and accommodate my exercise regimen.

#12 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 08:52 AM

Oh yeah, there is likely cross contamination if it's from a restaurant where they make regular pizza. It's impossible for there not to be. I've worked in pizza places, the flour gets everywhere.

Oatmeal almost always has gluten so I'd cut that out unless you can get a certified gluten free kind. (there are a few). Giving up rice for awhile would speed healing, but it isn't likely to be necessary for the experiment you are doing.

I'm naturally thin and athletic too (I hula hoop dance which burns millions of calories lol). Good fats like avocado, good carbs like sweet potatoes and good proteins like grass fed beef help me keep a healthy weight and be strong for workouts.

#13 arqa22

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 09:13 AM


Acne DOES NOT depend on diet and food.
I've seen multiple national and international-level dermatologists during my 8 years of nodule-cystic acne and seborrheic skin, and they all told me the same thing.
You can eat what you want, don't waste time like this. Don't listen to the crappy vodoo and grandma's advices about chocolate and food and stuff.
Go to a decent dermatologist and if your situation allows he will prescribe you the right regimen of drugs. Granted that NOTHING works like oral antibiotics, and, most of all, Roaccutan.


Yeah, I went through two rounds of Accutane back in 2005 to 2006. I don't even know why it was prescribed to me, as my acne was so mild then. Now it's moderately severe. Accutane really does work, doesn't it?!

A few things...

First, you have to be 100% sure you got ALL gluten out of your diet. There is a steep learning curve with this, although you may have it easier doing it nowdays than I did back in 07/08. Awareness has drastically increased in that short time--but still, there is a lot of hidden gluten in things. You'll want to look into every single package of processed food (I had to call company hotlines a lot), every vitamin and supplement you take, and also learn signs of hidden gluten (things like autolyzed yeast extract, msg, or other things that are in processed foods can be gluten). Sometimes there is something that says nothing on the label but contains gluten anyway.

Because of all of the above it took me about a year to actually be gluten free and it was a painstaking process, trying so hard and constantly getting it in my system by accident again and again. I'll give you an example: Lays potato chips. They say nothing on the label, or they might even say gluten free but unfortunately they are made on the same lines as gluten products and can therefore have a ton of gluten on them.

Your best bet is to avoid all processed foods for a bit, and that way you can know for sure you are 100% free and see how your body is doing. There's no point in an experiment if it isn't a controlled experiment.

Secondly, as someone else mentioned, you also won't have a controlled experiment if you are reacting to other foods as well. I had huge improvements going off gluten but it turned out (found this out after another year or so) that I was also reacting to dairy, corn, and soy. So it might be a good idea to cut these or anything you might suspect is a trigger for you out all at once, then see how clear you get, then test things one by one to figure out exact sensitivities. Also other sensitivities can appear or worsen after initially going off gluten *(what happened to me and what has apparently happened to a lot of people over at the celiac disease forums) so you might get clear for awhile and then discover another sensitivity. But worry about that later.

All in all, when I actually was able to remove all gluten, I'd say I saw noticeable improvements within a week, major improvements or clearing entirely within a month.


Thank you so much for taking the time to write this. Posted Image Yeah, yesterday I went to a pizza place that made gluten-free pizza, so I tried it. It was a bad idea. Ever since I ate it, I felt my anxiety creeping back (not over eating it, just general anxiety). I had been feeling great for days off gluten, but I think that pizza might have had cross-contamination. I also have a few extra pimples than I had been getting.

I think I'm going to stick to keeping my diet really basic, eating mostly protein and fruits and vegetables. But I'm wondering if I should cut out ALL grains, such as rice and oatmeal? I lose weight really easily, so I'm trying to find a good balance to gain weight and accommodate my exercise regimen.


pizza? dairy is more common to cause acne then gluten.

#14 overfl00d

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 02:36 PM

I do recommend you cut out all grains. If you're worried about weight loss, you shouldn't be if you're eating right! Eats lots of vegetables. Vegetables for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Get good protein like fish or chicken (although some people can break out from chicken because some are injected with hormones or they are fed grains their entire lives).

Also get protein powder. Whey protein is the best source of protein. If you're one of the few who can't tolerate Whey, there's alternatives like: Hemp, Egg, ect..

Edited by overfl00d, 18 May 2012 - 02:37 PM.


#15 alternativista

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 05:50 PM

pizza? dairy is more common to cause acne then gluten.


It doesn't matter what is more common. What matters is what affects you most.

#16 tim12

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 06:53 PM


pizza? dairy is more common to cause acne then gluten.


It doesn't matter what is more common. What matters is what affects you most.


Indeed, and for new people to the forum, just because something doesn't break you out, doesn't mean it isn't causing damage somehow (basically, limit consumption of unhealthy foods). For example, I can eat things like brownies now without breaking out, and generally added sugar in the past didn't either, but it doesn't mean I should eat it, or that it isn't contributing to a number of factors affecting acne - sort of a snowball effect (plus, especially during elimination diets imo, people tend to say "screw it" after a freebie, and then they eat more and more of the things, adding up the damage).

So OP,

I'd give things a few more months, and make sure all your other ducks are in good order as well (even if I eat right, if I sleep bad and get super stressed out, I'll likely get pimples). You should definitely go for the full on elimination diet, well, at least the major suspects. If you want more insurance, you could do something like an autoimmune protocol. From Robb Wolf's site -

Emerging research has made clear the link between Neolithic foods (grains, legumes and dairy) and autoimmune diseases such as Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and a host of other less well know conditions. Many people have found significant improvements in autoimmune disease by eliminating the Neolithic foods and building a diet around nutritious Paleo options. If you suffer from an autoimmune disease we highly recommend you start a Paleo diet and let us know what your results are. To give your body its best chance to heal we recommend that you initially limit the following foods:

  • Eggs
  • Tomatoes & eggplants
  • Peppers including bell peppers and hot peppers
  • Spices such as curries, paprika, and chili powder.
Some of these otherwise Paleo-friendly foods have been shown to be problematic in individuals with autoimmune issues. We recommend you fully remove not only these foods but also all Neolithic foods (grains, breads, potatoes, beans and dairy) for at least a month to see if they pose a problem for you.


Honestly, it might seem a bit hard at first, but you can get a handful of recipes to start, and buy your groceries in bulk so you'll always have things to eat, and not be tempted to eat other stuff. After the first week or so, it becomes pretty easy! The reason why I advocate a full on 30 day elimination diet + methodically adding foods back in is because I cut out gluten and dairy a while ago, but also had to avoid some things like eggs, which I had as a staple, until I was fully clear. A bit of anecdotal evidence, a good number of people find that they can slowly add things back in after eating this way. When you do start to add things back, go for the high quality stuff, like pastured eggs, and just the yolks to start (antinutrients in the white), ghee, peeled potatoes as the antinutrients are mostly in the skin, cooked veggies as the antinutrients are mostly destroyed/neutralized by heat, etc.

Bonus points: things good for GI tract like bone broth & aloe vera gel, focusing on anti-inflammatory foods like salmon & seafood in general, low GL meals, some IF here and there, extra virgin coconut oil, probiotics, and much more Posted Image

Also, make sure to relax Posted Image You're on the right track to dealing with the many factors involved in acne, it's just a matter of time before you're clear!

Oh, and for me personally as far as diet/lifestyle positvely affecting my skin, things improved from the beginning, and then other symptoms like back/neck/joint/everywhere pain, headaches, being sick too often, insomnia, chronic fatigue, and all that went away in about 2 months of doing things full on so to speak. I'm pretty much clear now, but am doing an elimination diet + methodically adding back foods in so I can see what I can tolerate.

Edited by tim12, 18 May 2012 - 08:43 PM.


#17 WildGo0se

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 09:03 PM

Oh yeah, there is likely cross contamination if it's from a restaurant where they make regular pizza. It's impossible for there not to be. I've worked in pizza places, the flour gets everywhere.

Oatmeal almost always has gluten so I'd cut that out unless you can get a certified gluten free kind. (there are a few). Giving up rice for awhile would speed healing, but it isn't likely to be necessary for the experiment you are doing.

I'm naturally thin and athletic too (I hula hoop dance which burns millions of calories lol). Good fats like avocado, good carbs like sweet potatoes and good proteins like grass fed beef help me keep a healthy weight and be strong for workouts.


I did find a gluten-free oatmeal at Trader Joe's, but I think I will probably cut that out for the time being; same with rice. I want my intestinal tract to heal as quickly as possible! My goal is to be completely clear before my five-year anniversary next year/getting married, but hopefully before then.

Thank you for the tips on foods. :) I also heard avocados were DHT inhibitors, so there's some added benefit.



pizza? dairy is more common to cause acne then gluten.


It doesn't matter what is more common. What matters is what affects you most.


Indeed, and for new people to the forum, just because something doesn't break you out, doesn't mean it isn't causing damage somehow (basically, limit consumption of unhealthy foods). For example, I can eat things like brownies now without breaking out, and generally added sugar in the past didn't either, but it doesn't mean I should eat it, or that it isn't contributing to a number of factors affecting acne - sort of a snowball effect (plus, especially during elimination diets imo, people tend to say "screw it" after a freebie, and then they eat more and more of the things, adding up the damage).

So OP,

I'd give things a few more months, and make sure all your other ducks are in good order as well (even if I eat right, if I sleep bad and get super stressed out, I'll likely get pimples). You should definitely go for the full on elimination diet, well, at least the major suspects. If you want more insurance, you could do something like an autoimmune protocol. From Robb Wolf's site -

Emerging research has made clear the link between Neolithic foods (grains, legumes and dairy) and autoimmune diseases such as Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and a host of other less well know conditions. Many people have found significant improvements in autoimmune disease by eliminating the Neolithic foods and building a diet around nutritious Paleo options. If you suffer from an autoimmune disease we highly recommend you start a Paleo diet and let us know what your results are. To give your body its best chance to heal we recommend that you initially limit the following foods:

  • Eggs
  • Tomatoes & eggplants
  • Peppers including bell peppers and hot peppers
  • Spices such as curries, paprika, and chili powder.
Some of these otherwise Paleo-friendly foods have been shown to be problematic in individuals with autoimmune issues. We recommend you fully remove not only these foods but also all Neolithic foods (grains, breads, potatoes, beans and dairy) for at least a month to see if they pose a problem for you.


Honestly, it might seem a bit hard at first, but you can get a handful of recipes to start, and buy your groceries in bulk so you'll always have things to eat, and not be tempted to eat other stuff. After the first week or so, it becomes pretty easy! The reason why I advocate a full on 30 day elimination diet + methodically adding foods back in is because I cut out gluten and dairy a while ago, but also had to avoid some things like eggs, which I had as a staple, until I was fully clear. A bit of anecdotal evidence, a good number of people find that they can slowly add things back in after eating this way. When you do start to add things back, go for the high quality stuff, like pastured eggs, and just the yolks to start (antinutrients in the white), ghee, peeled potatoes as the antinutrients are mostly in the skin, cooked veggies as the antinutrients are mostly destroyed/neutralized by heat, etc.

Bonus points: things good for GI tract like bone broth & aloe vera gel, focusing on anti-inflammatory foods like salmon & seafood in general, low GL meals, some IF here and there, extra virgin coconut oil, probiotics, and much more Posted Image

Also, make sure to relax Posted Image You're on the right track to dealing with the many factors involved in acne, it's just a matter of time before you're clear!


Wow! You really gave a lot of new ideas and direction for this! My diet before used to consist of pretty much only Neolithic foods. That's all I'd ever eaten, and that's probably why my skin is so bad... from all that damage. You're right, even though eliminating dairy didn't do anything to my acne after a month, I'm still cutting it out of my diet because it can still be having some sort of negative effect (and I also did read someone on here said that she didn't see results from eliminating dairy until a few months in).

And I have to laugh, because for the passed week I've been relying on things like eggs, beans, and rice. But I'll just buy bulk of all the things I can eat, like you said. Definitely need to incorporate a lot more seafood. I almost never eat it.

Thank you so much for all your suggestions. It was a big help to me. :) I didn't even know about the antinutrients in eggs, vegetables, and potatoes.