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Questions Regarding Zinc Supplements...

zinc supplement treatment medication tablets

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#1 Connor Cliche

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:06 PM

So I've always wondered how I can optimize and make my personal regimen more efficient at what it does, all while benefiting my health (I drink tons of water, eat a lot of greens - I have Celiac disease so I don't have much choice - etc...) I had my mom pick up some Zinc supplement tablets today and I took one after eating my dinner because of the side effects if you don't take it with food.

Now, my supplement is only 10mg. I'm thinking of taking it both morning and night (after dinner) to see if I can keep any pimples that are planning to make an appearance at bay. I was reading reviews on Acne.org and I was prowling through the message boards, and I was wondering:

1. Most people say to take upwards of 50mg+ a day. Should I be taking this much? My acne case is very mild. I personally believe the 10-20mg a day would be fine for me.
2. I also read somewhere on the boards here (I can't for the life of me find the post now...) that Zinc has restored the colour in someone's face. I've been hitting the tanning beds - I know it's not recommended! - for prom, and my face tends to never tan anymore ever since being on the regimen. Could 20mg of Zinc a day help this?
3. Feeding from the above question, does BP cause the skin to bleach? I've noticed it bleaching some shirts, towels, and my bed linens, but can it bleach skin? I've been on the regimen for a little over two and a half years now.

Thanks for all of your help yet again!
Connor

#2 Connor Cliche

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 12:38 PM

Bump?

Still wondering! Ahah Posted Image

#3 texasgirl711

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 12:13 AM

I LOOKED UP SOME INFORMATION REGARDING ZINC AT: http://www.webmd.com...edientName=ZINC

hERE'S A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WHAT I READ ABOUT ZINC & ACNE. I HOPE THIS HELPS, IF NOT YOU CAN READ MORE ON THE SITE OR TALK TO A DR (WHICH IS ALWAYS YOUR BEST BET), GOOD LUCK!

ZINC DOSING



The following doses have been studied in scientific research:
  • For treating acne: 30-135 mg elemental zinc daily.

ZINC OVERVIEW INFORMATION



Zinc is a metal. It is called an “essential trace element” because very small amounts of zinc are necessary for human health.

Zinc is used for treatment and prevention of zinc deficiency and its consequences, including stunted growth and acute diarrhea in children, and slow wound healing.

It is also used for boosting the immune system, treating the common cold and recurrent ear infections, and preventing lower respiratory infections. It is also used for malaria and other diseases caused by parasites.

Some people use zinc for an eye disease called macular degeneration, for night blindness, and for cataracts. It is also used for asthma; diabetes; high blood pressure; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); and skin conditions such aspsoriasis, eczema, and acne.

Other uses include treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), blunted sense of taste (hypogeusia), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), severe head injuries, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, Hansen’s disease, ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcers and promoting weight gain in people with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa.

Some people use zinc for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), male infertility, erectile dysfunction (ED), weak bones (osteoporosis), rheumatoid arthritis, and muscle cramps associated with liver disease. It is also used for sickle cell disease and inherited disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, thalassemia, and Wilson’s disease.

Some athletes use zinc for improving athletic performance and strength.

Zinc is also applied to the skin for treating acne, aging skin, herpes simplexinfections, and to speed wound healing.

There is a zinc preparation that can be sprayed in the nostrils for treating the common cold.

Zinc sulfate is used in products for eye irritation.

Zinc citrate is used in toothpaste and mouthwash to prevent dental plaque formation and gingivitis.

Note that many zinc products also contain another metal called cadmium. This is because zinc and cadmium are chemically similar and often occur together in nature. Exposure to high levels of cadmium over a long time can lead to kidney failure. The concentration of cadmium in zinc-containing supplements can vary as much as 37-fold. Look for zinc-gluconate products. Zinc gluconate consistently contains the lowest cadmium levels.





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