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Acne Prone Skin/sebum Deficient In Linoleic Acid, Possible Topical Solution

vitamin d vitamin a vitamin e biotin fish oil omega-3 zinc

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#41 NewBrigade

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 07:56 AM

Wow. I might well do that.

#42 OPeggyGordon

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:10 AM

wow, I am reading this an my head is just spinning, Im not that understanding of scientific principls but, long story short is lineleic acid deficiency causes acne to some degree, right?
Alternitiveista, can you give a simple list of things which we can do or take to treat this? Evening primrose oil for starters?
I just need thing stated simply as possible you guys have left me in the dust ;-)

Edited by OPeggyGordon, 08 May 2012 - 08:10 AM.


#43 doodleme123

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 12:45 PM

Unless you have an issue metabolizing fats, in which case you should look into lipase and pancreatic health and possibly take lipase supplements.


Would that include thin people who have acne that find it hard to gain weight? I often see fat people who eat all they want and don't have acne. I'm sure that's been debated elsewhere on this forum.

#44 hugoll12

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:40 PM

is evening primrose oil a good source of linoleic acid?

#45 alternativista

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 02:42 PM

This was posted before, but note how it provides one cause for acne that is worse in some seasons than others:

Another way to boost ceramides in the skin, in this article primarily about gut flora but includes info on topical probiotic use:

Streptococcus thermophilus, a species found in most yogurts, can increase ceramide production when applied to the skin for 7 days as a cream [58]. This work, which has since been replicated [59,60], is of relevance to acne, particularly when considering that some of the ceramide sphingolipids, most notably phytosphingosine (PS), provide both antimicrobial activity againstPropionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) and direct anti-inflammatory activity [61]. Sphingolipids have been noted to be low in acne [62], and the seasonal loss of ceramides may be a driving force behind much higher dermatological office visits for acne during winter months [63]. Indeed, topical application of 0.2% PS reduced papules and pustules by 89% in a recent 2-month pilot study [61].
http://www.ncbi.nlm....63/?tool=pubmed


Edited by alternativista, 15 May 2012 - 10:02 AM.


#46 land

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:12 PM

This was posted before, but note how it provides one cause for acne that is worse in some seasons than others:

Another way to boost ceramides in the skin, in this article primarily about gut flora but includes info on topical probiotic use:


Quote


Streptococcus thermophilus, a species found in most yogurts, can increase ceramide production when applied to the skin for 7 days as a cream [58]. This work, which has since been replicated [59,60], is of relevance to acne, particularly when considering that some of the ceramide sphingolipids, most notably phytosphingosine (PS), provide both antimicrobial activity againstPropionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) and direct anti-inflammatory activity [61]. Sphingolipids have been noted to be low in acne [62], and the seasonal loss of ceramides may be a driving force behind much higher dermatological office visits for acne during winter months [63]. Indeed, topical application of 0.2% PS reduced papules and pustules by 89% in a recent 2-month pilot study [61].

http://www.ncbi.nlm....63/?tool=pubmed


where could you even purchase this, or a cream/oil containing this, to be applied topically?

#47 alternativista

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 08:22 AM


This was posted before, but note how it provides one cause for acne that is worse in some seasons than others:

Another way to boost ceramides in the skin, in this article primarily about gut flora but includes info on topical probiotic use:


Quote

Streptococcus thermophilus, a species found in most yogurts, can increase ceramide production when applied to the skin for 7 days as a cream [58]. This work, which has since been replicated [59,60], is of relevance to acne, particularly when considering that some of the ceramide sphingolipids, most notably phytosphingosine (PS), provide both antimicrobial activity againstPropionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) and direct anti-inflammatory activity [61]. Sphingolipids have been noted to be low in acne [62], and the seasonal loss of ceramides may be a driving force behind much higher dermatological office visits for acne during winter months [63]. Indeed, topical application of 0.2% PS reduced papules and pustules by 89% in a recent 2-month pilot study [61].
http://www.ncbi.nlm....63/?tool=pubmed


where could you even purchase this, or a cream/oil containing this, to be applied topically?


Use yogurt. And note that we are deficient in the ceramide sphingolipids because of our linoleic acid deficiency.

Edited by alternativista, 15 May 2012 - 10:04 AM.


#48 alternativista

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 10:24 AM

dog report -

So, while for a week or so, I'd noticed the dog scratching a lot less over all, he'd began chewing and licking his feet and legs more and was losing hair there. I wondered if he was doing it to lick off the oil/aloe blend I was applying to him. And then, a few days ago I discovered he'd broken out in hot spots all over. As apparently moisture is a culprit in this (it's worse in humid climates like this one and it's been raining, in dogs that swim, etc.), I've decided to stop what I was doing. I'll just squirt some safflower oil onto the back of his neck the way you do with other spot on treatments. And I think treat the hot spots with ACV. Vinegar is supposed to stop itching of things like bug bites, right? If I take him to the vet, they'll want to give him antibiotics and steroids.

Apparently active breed dogs often scratch out of boredom and/or some neuro compulsive behavior, so I wonder if he does this to occupy himself when I leave him alone.

So anyway, I'm still hoping the linoleic acid is the solution. I only found one or two fleas when I combed him last so either he's less attractive to fleas because of the linoleic acid. Or maybe his improved lipid structure makes the spot on flea treatment work better. Or both.

Edited by alternativista, 15 May 2012 - 01:14 PM.


#49 alternativista

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 02:53 PM

There's more



This was posted before, but note how it provides one cause for acne that is worse in some seasons than others:

Another way to boost ceramides in the skin, in this article primarily about gut flora but includes info on topical probiotic use:


Quote

Streptococcus thermophilus, a species found in most yogurts, can increase ceramide production when applied to the skin for 7 days as a cream [58]. This work, which has since been replicated [59,60], is of relevance to acne, particularly when considering that some of the ceramide sphingolipids, most notably phytosphingosine (PS), provide both antimicrobial activity againstPropionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) and direct anti-inflammatory activity [61]. Sphingolipids have been noted to be low in acne [62], and the seasonal loss of ceramides may be a driving force behind much higher dermatological office visits for acne during winter months [63]. Indeed, topical application of 0.2% PS reduced papules and pustules by 89% in a recent 2-month pilot study [61].
http://www.ncbi.nlm....63/?tool=pubmed


where could you even purchase this, or a cream/oil containing this, to be applied topically?


Use yogurt. And note that we are deficient in the ceramide sphingolipids because of our linoleic acid deficiency.


There's more info on this here in that resveraterol thread I keep telling people to visit. Do it. It's good. Link straight to a post on sphingosine http://www.acne.org/...80#entry3235002

#50 land

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 02:58 PM

There's more info on this here in that resveraterol thread I keep telling people to visit. Do it. It's good. Link straight to a post on sphingosine http://www.acne.org/...80#entry3235002


>Yeah, that's a great thread..I've been applying grapeseed oil topically (light amounts, before bed) to my face, neck/upper chest. By morning it's fully absorbed and my face is not oily. I've seen some improvement, but I'll post back after a month or so to confirm.Going to get some organic yogurt (as plain as I can find at Publix) for face masks and try that as well.PS, my grapeseed oil is sold unrefrigerated, I've seen you mention yours must be kept cold?</p>

Edited by land, 15 May 2012 - 02:58 PM.


#51 alternativista

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 03:22 PM

There's more info on this here in that resveraterol thread I keep telling people to visit. Do it. It's good. Link straight to a post on sphingosine http://www.acne.org/...80#entry3235002


>Yeah, that's a great thread..I've been applying grapeseed oil topically (light amounts, before bed) to my face, neck/upper chest. By morning it's fully absorbed and my face is not oily. I've seen some improvement, but I'll post back after a month or so to confirm.Going to get some organic yogurt (as plain as I can find at Publix) for face masks and try that as well.PS, my grapeseed oil is sold unrefrigerated, I've seen you mention yours must be kept cold?</p>


Unless you buy it in small quantities that you use up quickly, you should store it in the fridge. Regardless, it should be stored in the dark. Try to get the best quality you can and a sign that they care about quality is that it will come in a dark bottle. I buy a brand from California that also makes a very good olive oil (based on everything I know about quality olive oil) so I'm hoping they also make a quality grapeseed and safflower oil. We discussed the olive oil scam and what to look for in a good olive oil in a thread a few weeks ago: http://www.acne.org/...ly#entry3234933

Edited by alternativista, 15 May 2012 - 03:37 PM.


#52 alternativista

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 04:56 PM

Circadian cycle affects linoleic acid metabolism
During darkness, high levels of melatonin released by the pineal gland block the ability of tumors to take up linoleic acid and convert it to 13-HODE (a molecule called 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid). While exposed to light, however, melatonin levels are extremely low, and tumors are no longer protected by melatonin from the tumor-stimulating action of linoleic acid. In other words, exposure to artificial light when it is naturally dark, scrambles the molecular clocks in our brains. Light presented during the night will immediately turn off melatonin production and thus support tumor growth."
- Andreas Moritz, Timeless Secrets of Health & Rejuvenation: Unleash The Natural Healing Power That Lies Dormant Within You(Get the book.)

#53 tritonxiv

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 05:09 PM

Circadian cycle affects linoleic acid metabolism
During darkness, high levels of melatonin released by the pineal gland block the ability of tumors to take up linoleic acid and convert it to 13-HODE (a molecule called 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid). While exposed to light, however, melatonin levels are extremely low, and tumors are no longer protected by melatonin from the tumor-stimulating action of linoleic acid. In other words, exposure to artificial light when it is naturally dark, scrambles the molecular clocks in our brains. Light presented during the night will immediately turn off melatonin production and thus support tumor growth."
- Andreas Moritz, Timeless Secrets of Health & Rejuvenation: Unleash The Natural Healing Power That Lies Dormant Within You(Get the book.)


Does this mean that melatonin supplementation may prevent cancer? I think 100% of us are exposed to artificial light at night....

Edited by tritonxiv, 21 May 2012 - 05:15 PM.


#54 alternativista

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 05:15 PM


Circadian cycle affects linoleic acid metabolism
During darkness, high levels of melatonin released by the pineal gland block the ability of tumors to take up linoleic acid and convert it to 13-HODE (a molecule called 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid). While exposed to light, however, melatonin levels are extremely low, and tumors are no longer protected by melatonin from the tumor-stimulating action of linoleic acid. In other words, exposure to artificial light when it is naturally dark, scrambles the molecular clocks in our brains. Light presented during the night will immediately turn off melatonin production and thus support tumor growth."
- Andreas Moritz, Timeless Secrets of Health & Rejuvenation: Unleash The Natural Healing Power That Lies Dormant Within You(Get the book.)


Does this mean that melatonin supplementation may prevent cancer?


You should research that. For me, it's just one more way as natural as possible circadian cycle is good for you. An unnatural one is bad. And a possible reason people's acne gets better on vacation, in sunlight, etc. Because they are outdoors in bright light.

It's also possible that UV light stimulates the conversion of beta carotene to retinoids in our skin. And polymorphism of a gene/enzyme involved in this conversion has been identified in acne prone skin.

Edited by alternativista, 21 May 2012 - 05:16 PM.


#55 alternativista

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 08:08 AM

In the list of benefits in my first post is a reduction in hyper pigmentation. I have had a red splotch on my face for months, possibly since last July. It occasionally would get more inflamed and red then fade a bit. But it was always something that needed extra conceal or. I just noticed thatbit has faded to the point that I haven't made an effort to conceal it in a week or so. I don't know if it is just inhibiting the pigment or if it is healing whatever it is.

#56 pm2

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 10:56 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18489348
phytosphingosine reduced papules and pustules by 89%

http://cerave.com/ou...turizing-lotion
Ingredients: phytosphingosine
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/7657446
niacinamide reduced papules and pustules by 60%

http://cerave.com/ou...izing-lotion-pm
Ingredients: niacinamide+phytosphingosine

i do not trust/believe these trials/studys, i think the effect is overestimated.

much the same
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21668835
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9692305


Edited by pm2, 13 August 2014 - 01:14 PM.


#57 alternativista

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 01:50 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18489348
phytosphingosine reduced papules and pustules by 89%

http://cerave.com/ou...urizing-lotion/
Ingredients: phytosphingosine
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/7657446
niacinamide reduced papules and pustules by 60%

http://cerave.com/ou...zing-lotion-pm/
Ingredients: niacinamide+phytosphingosine

i do not trust/believe these trials/studys, i think the effect is overestimated.


Well. Degussa has a nasty history. They made pesticides and a chemical used in the gas chambers in the Holocaust.

#58 alternativista

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 02:39 PM

This is from a company that sells products with something called Inca Inchi Oil.


Linoleic acid is a necessary element of sebum. Sebaceous glands release sebum to supply lubrication of follicles and surrounding skin. Linoleic acid and alpha-linoleic acids are 'essential fatty acids' required by the body. You may be more familiar with these bio-chemicals as Omega-3 and -6 oil.

Studies have discovered links that propose that Trans fats may break down the body's own supply of linoleic and alpha-linoleic acids. This is why acne breakouts are more likely to appear in people that have a deficiency in Omega-3 and Omega-6 oils.

The appearance of acne can be due to sebum being produced with oleic acids which can cause irritation to the skin. It has been suggested that oleic acid sebum is more desiccant, stiffer and more prone to create blackheads, whiteheads and to shape follicular plugs which lead to blemish infections.

It is known that Omega-3 decreases inflammation and that Omega-6 promotes inflammation. A lack of these oils encourages the development of skin conditions while a correct balance helps to maintain and promote well being.


They don't cite a source with this article, but I've posted something about trans fats breaking down linoleic acid before. And we've had people that noticed they break out when they consume trans fat.

#59 alternativista

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 10:04 AM

A somewhat related thing.


This study seems to show that high intakes of saturated fat only increase LDL if intake of linoleic acid is very low, below 4.5% of energy :


Cholesterolaemic effect of palmitic acid in relation to other dietary fatty acids


http://apjcn.nhri.or...11sup5/S401.pdf



#60 jordeyy

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 08:17 AM

would hemp seed oil be just as good as grapeseed oil? i've seen people who recommend it highly above the other oils. if so, what should i look for when buying hemp oil? i have many blocked pores, many of which eventually get inflamed and turn into spots, so i think the oil method would work for me




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