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Fake Olive Oils?

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Few days ago on MDA there was a post of his talking about olive oil. In the comments section someone brought up the fact that a lot of olive oils are fake and aren't 100% pure. This freaked me out a bit as I consume it daily. Apparently there is a test where you can stick the bottle in the fridge and if it solidifies overnight its real, if it stays liquid its fake(not sure about the accuracy of this method).

So I tested it out using 1/2 a cup worth in a glass cup. There was no change overnight but I decided to just leave it in there. On the second morning about 1/2 of it had solifidied, while the top half remained a liquid. This led be to believe that it was maybe 50% olive oil. However the next morning about 80% of it had solidified, and almost all of it by the next.

So obviously it wasnt a very conclusive test and I still have no idea whether my EVOO is legit or not. Has anyone ever heard of it being fake? And If so do you know of any alternate testing methods?

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i have heard of this before, but i dont know how true it is.

i just eat whole olives, no sense in just eating the oil, they have squeezed lots of good stuff out.

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Yeah I was worried about this too after I read this article. http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/jan/04/olive-oil-real-thing

I am definitely suspicious about this, and as I live in an area that doesn't produce the stuff and isn't part of our heritage I think it would be a bit easier for them to dupe us here.

I think you might be able to test it by heating a small amount, because olive should smoke when hot shouldn't it?

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If you want to be sure of the quality, try picking up one of the brands the UC Davis study recommended:

http://goo.gl/4M7nb

I picked up the McEvoy Ranch bottle from Whole Foods and it's been great.

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I've never heard that they were 'fake.' I'd heard that they often aren't the quality you think they are. Especially if it says it's from Italy where they get olives/oil of various quality from all over, blend and label as Italian EVOO. I had always been suspicious that every bottle in most supermarkets was 'Italian.' Where is all the Spanish, Greek, Turkish, Mexican, Californian, etc olive oils? A few supermarkets will sell Borges which is from Spain, but other than that only specialty stores have oils from elsewhere.

A good olive oil should stated its acidity on the label and i've noticed that few bottles do. The stuff I buy from Califonia, called Napa something and annoyingly bottled like wine with a cork instead of cap, does.

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Ya from the articles I read it seems that stuff from California is generally legit. Its the imported oils that are the main problem

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Ya from the articles I read it seems that stuff from California is generally legit. Its the imported oils that are the main problem

Especially if they claim to be from Italy. I think Borges from Spain is a good product, but I haven't seen it for sale in a long time. The Carrabas restaurant people use it exclusively and I read an article that they use most of all that gets imported into the U.S.

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Restaurants and places supposedly using olive oil vinegaretts are actually using olive oil mixes, which are usually part olive oil and then some other nasty oil.

It makes sense that olive oil might solidify partially at cold temperatures, considering it is something like 10% sat. fat.

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Nice post, wasn't aware of this until now. I usually just buy Braggs EVOO since I like their ACV, and it's from Greece. The stuff at places like Big Lots mostly say they're importanted, so they're probably the crappy stuff. I'm buying it for my parents especially, since they're always using "heart healthy" canola oil, and convincing them to use EVOO is much easier than convincing them to use grass fed pastured butter.

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Ya Ive seen Braggs products @ my health food store so Im probably going to try their olive oil next.

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Restaurants and places supposedly using olive oil vinegaretts are actually using olive oil mixes, which are usually part olive oil and then some other nasty oil.

It makes sense that olive oil might solidify partially at cold temperatures, considering it is something like 10% sat. fat.

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Bump.

I use kirkland olive oil (it is from italy)

and spectrum olive oil (it is from spain).

Are these legit? They claim to be first cold pressed and extra virgin...

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Bump.

I use kirkland olive oil (it is from italy)

and spectrum olive oil (it is from spain).

Are these legit? They claim to be first cold pressed and extra virgin...

Don't know. Did you check the list from the study?

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If you want to know if you really have EVOO and that it's fresh, the easiest and best way is to taste it.

Take a spoonful of olive oil and before you swallow, inhale some air in through your closed teeth and then work the oil around your mouth and then swallow. You are looking for three characteristics of a good oil. The smell should remind you of some sort of fruit or vegetable(e.g. tomatoes), the taste should be bitter, and the oil should have a peppery taste in your throat. All three are very important for a good EVOO and this is what they do at an olive oil tasting(just like wine).

If you have a peppery taste at the back of your throat then you have EVOO(refined oils don't have this), the stonger the taste, the better. Oleocanthal (a compound in extra virgin olive oil) is responsible for this. The peppery taste is also a sign the oil is very high in antioxidants.

A lot of people buy oil that has been sitting in a shop for over a year and oil could be rancid. Always keep oil away from heat and light and use it within 1-2 months. If the oil smells like paint or alcohol then it's rancid.

So remember, a good smell, a bitter taste and a nice peppery taste at the back of your throat.

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i use delmonte's evoo along with rice bran oil(which is when my mum cooks..thats the lunch.dinner)

i've never kept it in the fridge.also it does nt come in a dark bottle.saywhat.gif

the store i get it from has borges(that too on 50% off sale)

next time!

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