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#21 alternativista

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:05 AM

Alternatives to deodorants/Antipersperants

 

This was on Dr. Weil's site just a little ways down from the little bit of diet advice he offers to acne suffers. I like the green tea one. Perhaps use the same diluted ACV/Green tea toner we all ought to be using.

 

  • An easy solution to reducing bacteria is to splash on rubbing alcohol.
  • Most commercial deodorant products contain irritating or harmful ingredients, including aluminum salts and dyes. Avoid the antiperspirant varieties. You can find better products in health-food stores, such as those containing extracts of green tea, which is antibacterial.
  • If you buy "natural crystals," make sure they do not contain aluminum in any form.
  • Stimulant drugs, including coffee and tea, contribute to body odor by increasing the activity of apocrine sweat glands, special glands in hairy parts of the body that produce strong-smelling, musky secretions. Try eliminating caffeine if body odor continues to be a problem.


#22 alternativista

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 05:10 PM

Article about the pervasiveness of petroleum-based chemicals in our bodies, primarily from topically applied cosmetics and other chemicals. Versus the benefits of coconut oil.

 

http://www.greenmedi...oleum-body-care

 

And speaking of chemicals getting into our bodies, on an episode of one of his shows, Bill Nye the Science Guy commented that they don't need to use as much formaldehyde to embalm dead bodies any more because the bodies are already full of it. Of course, he said it took twice as much 20 years ago than it does today, and it just can't be true that we are half embalmed. And this guy points out that they remove your blood when they embalm, so it would make no difference. Still, that new car smell is a bad thing. And the new paint and any other strong chemical odor.  Use low or no VOC paints and let anything else air out, in the sun if possible, until the smell is gone.


Edited by alternativista, 07 May 2013 - 05:18 PM.


#23 alternativista

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:17 PM

Article on alternatives to NSAIDs for pain. 

http://www.greenmedi...bd334b-86969685

 

NSAIDs impair skin barrier function & thyroid. and more.  I forget how even though I just read it yesterday in one of my other threads.

 

  1. Ginger – A 2009 study found that ginger capsules (250 mg, four times daily) were as effective as the drugs mefenamic acid and ibuprofen for relieving pain in women associated with their menstrual cycle (primary dysmenorrhea). [7]

  2. Topical Arnica – A 2007 human study found that topical treatment with arnica was as effective as ibuprofen for hand osteoarthritis, but with lower incidence of side effects.[8]

  3. Combination: Astaxanthin, Ginkgo biloba and Vitamin C - A 2011 animal study found this combination to be equal to or better than ibuprofen for reducing asthma-associated respiratory inflammation.[9]

  4. Chinese Skullcap (baicalin) – A 2003 animal study found that a compound in Chinese skullcap known as baicalin was equipotent to ibuprofen in reducing pain.[10]

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids: A 2006 human study found that omega-3 fatty acids (between 1200-2400 mg daily) were as effective as ibuprofen in reducing arthritis pain, but with the added benefit of having less side effects.[11]

  6. Panax Ginseng – A 2008 animal study found that panax ginseng had analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity similar to ibuprofen, indicating its possible anti-rheumatoid arthritis properties.[12]

  7. St. John’s Wort – A 2004 animal study found that St. John’s wort was twice as effective as ibuprofen as a pain-killer.[13]

  8. Anthrocyanins from Sweet Cherries & Raspberries – A 2001 study cell study found that anthrocyanins extracted from raspberries and sweet cherries were as effective as ibuprofen and naproxen at suppressing the inflammation-associated enzyme known as cyclooxygenase-1 and 2.[14]

  9. Holy Basil – A 2000 study found that holy basil contains compounds with anti-inflammatory activity comparable to ibuprofen, naproxen and aspirin.[15]

  10. Olive Oil (oleocanthal) – a compound found within olive oil known as oleocanthal has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties similar to ibuprofen.[16]

 

And they left off capcaicin.  aka hot chillies.  I mix cayenne with aloe vera for sore muscles. And I inhale a dab for my stuffy nose.


Edited by alternativista, 08 January 2014 - 07:24 PM.


#24 alternativista

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 05:28 PM

I'm announcing that I am going 'no poo' as they tend to call the Baking soda wash, ACV rinse method.  No shampoo and no conditioner.  (I haven't used soap on my face and body for years) 

 

My last 3 'shampoos' have been using this method.  About one tablespoon of baking soda to a cup of water to wash.  And one tablespoon ACV to one cup water as a leave on conditioner. Currently I wash about every 3 days. I shall report if I start to need this less and less.

 

I still currently dye my hair with a no ammonia semi-permanent color (natural Instincts) and afterwards use the conditioner it comes with. That would be once per month.  I was hesitant to try the baking soda afraid it would strip the color, but I've read so many people swear it didn't. At least, less than the commercial sudsy shampoos. Someday I'll try henna.

 

Oh, and money saving, environment helping hair dye tip - Once you've dyed your hair your desired color, you should only do the roots from then on.  So instead of mixing the whole bottle and pouring the leftovers down the drain, go to a beauty supply and get an applicator bottle with the measurements on it.  Most dyes are one to one color and activator or whatever.  They usually are 2 ounces each. So just pour one ounce each into your applicator bottle and save the rest for next month.   Next month, you can use the bottle that came in the box. Half the chemicals, half the garbage, half the price.

 

Edit - I quit using the Baking soda/vinegar method a few months ago. Instead. I'm mostly not washing at all. Just rinsing with water, although once over the past month I tried washing with cheap conditioner  and once or twice I used a few drops of shampoo in a cup of water.  The goal is to rinse only with water once a week and/or whenever needed to remove pollutants, smells, smoke, etc.   I'm still experimenting with hot to get there. Because what happens is that after a few days your hair gets waxy. Muscle through it a few more days and it suddenly becomes wonderful. As if by magic. It no longer feels greasy. It has all this body & manageability I've never had before. It doesn't frizz even after walks in warm, muggy drizzle. And I can comb out tangles despite not having coated it with tons of conditioner.   But then I rinse/wash/color or whatever and I have to go through the waxy stage again. And so I've been experimenting with ways to deal as my hair hopefully normalizes.


Edited by alternativista, 23 April 2014 - 03:48 PM.


#25 alternativista

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:28 PM

Avoid antibacterial cleansers of any kind.

 

The obsession with avoiding and killing all microbes you come in contact with is one of the biggest reasons people these days have such poor immune systems and are filled with allergies that were unheard of when I was a kid. And the bacteria are evolving and becoming stronger as only the strongest survive the antibacterial soaps and they are the ones that multiply. Antibacterial soaps are why we now have antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria including one that causes such a severe infection in people with poor immune systems that it kills half the people who get it.  They call it CRE. The 'C' in CRE stands for the name of the most powerful/best antibiotic we have.  The 'R' stands for resistant.  So, if your immune system can't fight off this infection, there's nothing they can do for you. 

 

This doesn't just affect us, but also our environment, especially our waterways, which also suffer from overgrowth of other microbes when the bacteria should be there is destroyed. Also, our plumbing is suffering because microbes that would eat up much of the gunk in our pipes are being killed and so you get more clogs and probably dump more chemicals into the drain and thus into our water.

 

When washing hands, use ordinary soap and rub wet hands together briskly long enough to sing happy birthday twice. The friction of your hands, running water and slippery soap help wash them down the drain.

 

Most of the bacteria on your face is beneficial. You cause an imbalance by killing them and let harmful microbes grow. 


Edited by alternativista, 30 May 2013 - 05:30 PM.


#26 alternativista

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:32 PM

Good blog. This post is about raising healthier children but its good info for everyone. Contains links to many recipes for making your own products. http://wellnessmama....-childs-health/

Also, I've been meaning to post a link to the Crunchy Betty blog. Especially big on making masks out of food, but there's all kinds of recipes for avoiding chemicals, saving money and not playing the whole consumer game. You'll have to google.

I also found some much easier ways to make laundry soap. For a liquid, which usually means cooking and a lot of work, you cut bar soap in chunks and put them in a jar with water and let sit. Eventually they'll dissolve and you can stir in the borax and such. For a powder, which usually mean's grating and food processing to turn it to powder, laundry bar soap can be microwaved for a bit. It'll puff up in a weird blob, but when it cools, you can crumble it to a fine powder with your hands. I don't know if you can do that with glycerine or other natural soaps.

 

These are in my Pinterest board. I'll have to find them and post details.


Also, if you just want to save a lot of money, you can make a very cheap laundry soap with 2 T dish washing liquid, 3 T washing soda and 3 T borax in water.  The blogger I found this on for some reason added this to a gallon of water and then used about 1 cup of the watery liquid for each load.  I don't see why you wouldn't add it to a smaller, empty detergent bottle with less water and then using the included measuring cap. Easier than keeping a soapy, sticky measuring cup around.  Also, she used Blue Dawn dishwashing liquid. And perhaps that works just as well with liquid glycerine soap.


Edited by alternativista, 05 February 2014 - 06:10 PM.


#27 alternativista

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 09:55 AM

Several skin care recipes here.  It includes a milk and baking soda scrub they swear clears blackheads.

 

http://www.expressni...ural-skin-care/



#28 alternativista

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 04:20 PM

Illegal cancer causing chemical found in nearly 100 top brand shampoos

 

http://inhabitat.com...using-shampoos/



#29 alternativista

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:19 PM

Just like what I've been saying. Just use oil:

 

http://www.treehugge...ing-winter.html

 

Also, I recently saw a post in which someone mentioned using magnesium oil for deodorant.  Have to research for more info.  Magnesium oil is a great way to supplement magnesium though. Use it to soothe sore muscles. Better than epsom salts.



#30 alternativista

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:44 PM

This article says that cheap drugstore brand Wet N Wild nail polish is free of the 3 worst chemicals that make nail polish one of the most toxic things you can do to yourself--formaldehyde,  toulene and dibutyl phthalate.  Some major brands like Revlon, Loreal, etc have products that are free of even more harmful chemicals, but do not assume that is so with every product they make. You have to look them up or read labels.

 

http://www.care2.com...ternatives.html

 

Wet N Wild tends to get good scores in the EWG's Skin Deep database.  But the color affects the amount of bad shit so you have to look up the specific shade.   Paler, sheerer colors are safer.


Edited by alternativista, 23 April 2014 - 04:06 PM.


#31 alternativista

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 02:05 PM

Microbes that can help protect us from the harmful chemicals we've filled our environment with

 

http://www.greenmedi...003e28-86969685

 

Mostly common probiotics. And yeasts, which I don't know if they are common or not. I'd have to look them up.  Kefir & Kombucha both contain yeast strains.  They are started with a SCOBY which stands for Symbiotic Colony of Bacteria & Yeast. 

 

Example:  Per animal studies, Bifidobacterium breve and Lactobacillus casei, common probiotics, can help prevent absorption of BPA in plastics

 

The P. Acnes strains in your skin protect you from MRSA.


Edited by alternativista, 23 April 2014 - 04:07 PM.


#32 CelloIsLove

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:00 PM

Parabens accumulate in breast tissue.
 

 

  • Recent research found higher concentrations of parabens in the upper quadrants of the breast and axillary area, where antiperspirants are usually applied, suggesting they may contribute to the development of breast cancer. One or more paraben esters were detected in 99 percent of the tissue samples collected from mastectomies. In 60 percent of the samples, all five paraben esters were present
  • Overall, topical application of personal care products containing parabens appear to be the greatest source of exposure to these estrogen-mimicking chemicals, far surpassing the risk of the aluminum in antiperspirants
  • Aluminum chloridethe active ingredient in antiperspirantshas been found to act similarly to the way oncogenes work to provide molecular transformations in cancer cells. Like parabens, aluminum salts also mimic estrogen, and bioaccumulate in breast tissue, which can raise your breast cancer risk
  • Despite the fact that parabens are used in such a wide variety of products, their safety is primarily based on a rat study from 1956, as modern toxicology studies are lacking, and not a single study on the chemicals carcinogenity follow acceptable regulatory standard carcinogenity study protocols, according to a recent review
>


The featured study by Barr et.al. discovered one or more paraben esters in 99 percent of the 160 tissue samples collected from 40 mastectomiesiii
. In 60 percent of the samples, all five paraben esters were present. There were no correlations between paraben concentrations and age, length of breast feeding, tumor location, or tumor estrogen receptor content.

While antiperspirants are a common source of parabens, the authors note that the source of the parabens cannot be established, and that 7 of the 40 patients reportedlynever used deodorants or antiperspirants in their lifetime. What this tells us is that parabens, regardless of the source, can bioaccumulate in breast tissue.

And the sources are many. Parabens can be found in a wide variety of personal care products, cosmetics, as well as drugs. That said, it appears the dermal route is the most significant form of exposure.

http://articles.merc...20524_DNL_art_1

---------
Also, consider if you even need to use anything. It isn't essential. I used anti perspirants for a bit in high school because I thought it was essential, like applying soap all over my body. But I've realized they don't do much for e at all. If its really hot and muggy or im doing a lot of physical activity, I'm going to perspire all over so what's the point of stopping it under my armpits? And on most days, I don't sweat that much.

 

 

Wonderful. Also, underarm odor can usually be lessened by cutting out processed foods and eating more veggies, especially greens.

 

Pacifica makes some wonderful fragrances that are all natural and come in more conventional scents (floral/fruit) however, wearing your own mix of essential oils as a perfume is both healing and uniquely beautiful.

 

Essential oils to add fragrance and healing to the home are also wonderful.



#33 alternativista

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 06:12 PM

The glyphosate in Roundup which is what is sprayed in massive amounts on Monsanto's roundup ready GMO crops is an endocrine disruptor.



#34 alternativista

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 11:57 AM

Visit The Story of Stuff project & watch the short movie "The Story of Cosmetics." 

 

http://storyofstuff....y-of-cosmetics/

 

Then watch the rest of the movies.  Hopefully they'll inspire you to make some changes.  Remember, you don't have to buy what they are selling.  You don't have to play their game. 


Edited by alternativista, 21 February 2014 - 04:27 PM.


#35 francis86

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 03:32 PM

Interesting thread. 

 

Regarding the homemade laundry detergents, I've been buying grated organic prickly pear soap from a local family who owns a prickly pear farm. They add a drop of cold pressed petitgrain oil. it's been great.

 

I always itch like crazy if I use store bought detergents. my guess is that's why my back and chest acne was always so persistent.



#36 alternativista

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:25 AM

Interesting thread. 

 

Regarding the homemade laundry detergents, I've been buying grated organic prickly pear soap from a local family who owns a prickly pear farm. They add a drop of cold pressed petitgrain oil. it's been great.

 

I always itch like crazy if I use store bought detergents. my guess is that's why my back and chest acne was always so persistent.

That's interesting. I'd like to know more about that.  We have prickly pear at the urban farm.  And I've been wondering why not use cactus or aloe 'slime' to make a shampoo that's slippery and doesn't require sudsy detergents to work it though your hair. 



#37 Michelle Reece

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 06:58 PM

Article about the pervasiveness of petroleum-based chemicals in our bodies, primarily from topically applied cosmetics and other chemicals. Versus the benefits of coconut oil.

 

http://www.greenmedi...oleum-body-care

 

And speaking of chemicals getting into our bodies, on an episode of one of his shows, Bill Nye the Science Guy commented that they don't need to use as much formaldehyde to embalm dead bodies any more because the bodies are already full of it. Of course, he said it took twice as much 20 years ago than it does today, and it just can't be true that we are half embalmed. And this guy points out that they remove your blood when they embalm, so it would make no difference. Still, that new car smell is a bad thing. And the new paint and any other strong chemical odor.  Use low or no VOC paints and let anything else air out, in the sun if possible, until the smell is gone.

 

The petroleum found in skin care isn't crude oil. The "petroleum", AKA petrolatum, in skin care is highly refined and the hydrocarbon numbers are 25+. Yes, petroleum is combustible, but the main concern is transporting and storing the raw product, not a finished lotion.

 

Greenmedinfo concluded incorrectly on the mice study. First, mice aren't people, and second, there were so many problems in the study you can't conclude anything from it. No randomization (apparently not until later or something? It's confusing), small sample size, the table conflicts with reported data, missing data from the mice on the follow-up, and at some points the data actually shows no difference between the treated and untreated mice. I've combed through the paper twice, and I wouldn't be surprised if I missed a few more flaws.



#38 Michelle Reece

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 02:06 AM

Article by Mercola on 7 ways to avoid carcinogens in the home includes this statement on carcinogens and toxins commonly used in cosmetics and skin care. And a few tables listing several of them.

'Putting chemicals on your skin is actually far worse than ingesting them, because when you eat something the enzymes in your saliva and stomach help break it down and flush it out of your body. When you put these chemicals on your skin however, they're absorbed straight into your blood stream without filtering of any kind, so the toxic chemicals from toiletries and beauty products are largely going directly to your internal organs.
There are literally thousands of chemicals used in personal care products, and only a tiny fraction of them have ever been tested for safety. According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, nearly 900 of the chemicals used in cosmetics are known to be toxic.'

http://articles.merc...21112_DNL_art_1

 

Not true with the bolded part. The stratum corneum blocks a lot of things (that's the whole point of the stratum corneum), and that doesn't account for ingredients degrading between the layers of skin, particularly the epidermis. Substances with high lipophilicity and under 500 Daltons tend to penetrate the skin the best. Polarity and penetration enhancers like propelyne glycol and occlusives like petrolatum also influence penetration, as well as if you have diseases like psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. How much you apply, where you apply it and the concentration matters too.


Edited by Michelle Reece, 12 March 2014 - 02:09 AM.


#39 alternativista

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 08:42 AM

Article by Mercola on 7 ways to avoid carcinogens in the home includes this statement on carcinogens and toxins commonly used in cosmetics and skin care. And a few tables listing several of them.

'Putting chemicals on your skin is actually far worse than ingesting them, because when you eat something the enzymes in your saliva and stomach help break it down and flush it out of your body. When you put these chemicals on your skin however, they're absorbed straight into your blood stream without filtering of any kind, so the toxic chemicals from toiletries and beauty products are largely going directly to your internal organs.
There are literally thousands of chemicals used in personal care products, and only a tiny fraction of them have ever been tested for safety. According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, nearly 900 of the chemicals used in cosmetics are known to be toxic.'

http://articles.merc...21112_DNL_art_1

 

Not true with the bolded part. The stratum corneum blocks a lot of things (that's the whole point of the stratum corneum), and that doesn't account for ingredients degrading between the layers of skin, particularly the epidermis. Substances with high lipophilicity and under 500 Daltons tend to penetrate the skin the best. Polarity and penetration enhancers like propelyne glycol and occlusives like petrolatum also influence penetration, as well as if you have diseases like psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. How much you apply, where you apply it and the concentration matters too.

 

And if you cause occlusion, such as with petroleum-based oils.

 

And yes, obviously I did not mean to imply that absolutely every drop of every thing that touches your skin goes straight to your bloodstream.  That would be crazy and I seriously doubt anyone interpreted my statement that way other than you.   Also, those aren't my words, they are a quote taken out of context. 

 

And many of us do have atopic dermatis, one of the many things that occur when linoleic acid is deficient in sebum.  And acne prone skin has been found to be deficient. 

 

There, two reasons why a high linoleic acid plant oil is a far better thing to put on your skin than petrolatum.


 

Article about the pervasiveness of petroleum-based chemicals in our bodies, primarily from topically applied cosmetics and other chemicals. Versus the benefits of coconut oil.

 

http://www.greenmedi...oleum-body-care

 

And speaking of chemicals getting into our bodies, on an episode of one of his shows, Bill Nye the Science Guy commented that they don't need to use as much formaldehyde to embalm dead bodies any more because the bodies are already full of it. Of course, he said it took twice as much 20 years ago than it does today, and it just can't be true that we are half embalmed. And this guy points out that they remove your blood when they embalm, so it would make no difference. Still, that new car smell is a bad thing. And the new paint and any other strong chemical odor.  Use low or no VOC paints and let anything else air out, in the sun if possible, until the smell is gone.

 

The petroleum found in skin care isn't crude oil. The "petroleum", AKA petrolatum, in skin care is highly refined and the hydrocarbon numbers are 25+. Yes, petroleum is combustible, but the main concern is transporting and storing the raw product, not a finished lotion.

 

Greenmedinfo concluded incorrectly on the mice study. First, mice aren't people, and second, there were so many problems in the study you can't conclude anything from it. No randomization (apparently not until later or something? It's confusing), small sample size, the table conflicts with reported data, missing data from the mice on the follow-up, and at some points the data actually shows no difference between the treated and untreated mice. I've combed through the paper twice, and I wouldn't be surprised if I missed a few more flaws.

 

Don't have the study memorized and don't have time to look it up, but will say that mammalian skin mostly functions the same.  Which is one of the reasons they can used rats in these studies.   Shall we go over all the flaws in the studies into pharmeceuticals?  And the outright fraud?


Edited by alternativista, 04 June 2014 - 09:41 AM.


#40 Michelle Reece

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 04:45 PM

And if you cover with something that makes occlusion occur.  

 

And yes, obviously I did not mean to imply that absolutely every drop of everything that touches your skin goes straight to your bloodstream.  That would be crazy and I seriously doubt anyone interpreted my statement that way other than you.

 

And many of us have atopic dermatis, one of the many things that occur when linoleic acid is deficient in sebum.  And acne prone skin has been found to be deficient. <blockquote>

 

How can anyone else not interpret that statement the way I did with these lines: "Putting chemicals on your skin is actually far worse than ingesting them... so the toxic chemicals from toiletries and beauty products are largely going directly to your internal organs"?

 

Also, some of the ingredients Mercola claimed were "toxic"/cancer-causing on that page actually aren't, especially when they're in very low concentrations that can't really absorb through the skin and accumulate, and he's misleading on the formaldehyde part.

 

True, investigators have been looking into linoleic acid, but it's not at the "approved" stage yet.

 

Don't have the study memorized and don't have time to look it up, but will say that mammalian skin mostly functions the same.  Which is one of the reasons they can used rats in these studies.   Shall we go over all the flaws in the studies into pharmeceuticals?  And the outright fraud?

 

Yes, rat skin is similar, but not so similar that we can just enroll rats in clinical trials and have to go straight to the market. Lots of promising medications crash and burn after the in vitro and rat stage. The same thing happened to oral resveratrol for a lot of diseases. There's a call into researching the conjugates instead.

 

Yes, there are flaws in studies and there is a lot of fraud in pharameceuticals. Read Ben Goldacre's Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients if you haven't already. But there's a ton of fraud in alternative medicine too, as exposed in Goldacre's Bad Science book.


Edited by Michelle Reece, 13 March 2014 - 01:58 AM.





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