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The History Of Acne

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#1 Omnivium

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 12:07 AM

Until about 30 minutes ago I was convinced that acne was a modern disease. But then this article came along: http://www.ncbi.nlm....d00581-0015.pdf It was called "The History of Acne". I admit I mostly just skimmed it, but it is about the origin of the word "acne". The article says that the ancient Greeks, Aristotle and Hippocrates talked about acne, as well as the ancient Romans, Pliny and Celsus. They all lived around 2,000 years ago. It goes on to talk about Egypt and even the mark of Cain.

I just found another website, but it looks like a summary of the first link: http://www.healthcar...ry-of-Acne.aspx

On the other side, there's Dr. Loren Cordain, who says you will get clear if you go on the paleo diet.

I'm busy right now, but I will research the diets of ancient Greeks and Romans and Egyptians and whatever else I think of later. I really want to get to the bottom of this, and I'm sure some of you are interested in this too. So feel free to do the research for me and post it. (I know none of you will; most of you readers don't even get an account for some reason. It's free and completely anonymous.) Anyway, if no one else does any of the research, I will do all of it myself.

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#2 Omnivium

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 09:31 PM

This might sound retarded, but I just learned what the word "cereal" means. Surprisingly, at least to me, it is not that stuff you buy in a box and pour in some milk. I'll let Wikipedia explain it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cereal

"Cereals are grasses (members of the monocot family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae)[1] cultivated for the edible components of their grain (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis), composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop[citation needed]; they are therefore staple crops."

Cereals consist of maize, rice, wheat, barley, sorghum, millet, oats, rye, triticale, fonio, buckwheat, quinoa and others.

This is not some random food lecture. It is actually important in finding out the origins of acne. I didn't get much history from that Wikipedia page, but I did find a Wikipedia page called "History of bread": http://en.wikipedia....istory_of_bread


"Prehistory

The earliest archaeological evidence for flour, which was likely processed into an unleavened bread, dates to the Upper Palaeolithic in Europe, around 30,000 years ago.[3] During this period of human history cereals constituted just one of many food sources exploited by hunting and gathering;[4] palaeolithic European diets were based mainly on animal proteins and fats.[3] Cereals and bread became a staple food during the Neolithic, around 10,000 years ago, when wheat and barley were among the first plants to be domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. Wheat-based agriculture spread from Southwest Asia to Europe, North Africa and the Indian Subcontinent. In other parts of the world cereals such as rice (East Asia), maize (the Americas) and sorghum (sub-Saharan Africa), which are also sometimes made into bread, were independently domesticated and formed the basis of alternative agricultural systems.[5] Around the world, the shift from varied hunter-gatherer subsistence to agricultural diets based predominantly on a cereal staple such as wheat bread marked an important turning point in human history. Though in many ways nutritionally deficient compared to hunting and gathering, cereal crops allowed agricultural societies to sustain much larger populations than had previously been possible, which in turn led to greater economic specialisation, social complexity and eventually the rise of civilised states.[6]
The development of leavened bread can also probably be traced to prehistoric times. Yeast spores occur everywhere, including the surface of cereal grains, so any dough left to rest will become naturally leavened.[7] Although leavening is likely of prehistoric origin, the earliest archaeological evidence is from ancient Egypt. Scanning electron microscopy has detected yeast cells in some ancient Egyptian loaves. However, ancient Egyptian bread was made from emmer wheat and has a dense crumb. In cases where yeast cells are not visible, it is difficult, by visual examination, to determine whether the bread was leavened. As a result, the extent to which bread was leavened in ancient Egypt remains uncertain.[8]

The importance of bread in the formation of early human societies cannot be overstated. From the western half of Asia, where wheat was domesticated, cultivation spread north and west, to Europe and North Africa, and enabled humans to become farmers rather than hunters and foragers. This in turn led to the formation of towns, as opposed to the nomadic lifestyle, and gave rise to more and more sophisticated forms of societal organization. Similar developments occurred in eastern Asia, centered on rice, and in the Americas with maize.


Antiquity

There were multiple sources of leavening available for early bread. Airborne yeasts could be harnessed by leaving uncooked dough exposed to air for some time before cooking. Pliny the Elder reported that the Gauls and Iberians used the foam skimmed from beer to produce "a lighter kind of bread than other peoples." Parts of the ancient world that drank wine instead of beer used a paste composed of grape must and flour that was allowed to begin fermenting, or wheat bran steeped in wine, as a source for yeast. The most common source of leavening however was to retain a piece of dough from the previous day to utilize as a form of sourdough starter.[9]
The idea of a free-standing oven that could be pre-heated, with a door for access, appears to have been a Greek one.[10]
Even in antiquity there were a wide variety of breads. In ancient times the Greek bread was barley bread: Solon declared that wheaten bread might only be baked for feast days. By the 5th century bread could be purchased in Athens from a baker's shop, and in Rome, Greek bakers appeared in the 2nd century BC, as Hellenized Asia Minor was added to Roman dominion as the province of Asia;[11] the foreign bakers of bread were permitted to form a collegium. In the Deipnosophistae, the author Athenaeus (c.A.D.170-c. 230) describes some of the bread, cakes, cookies, and pastries available in the Classical world.[12] Among the breads mentioned are griddle cakes, honey-and-oil bread, mushroom-shaped loaves covered in poppy seeds, and the military specialty of rolls baked on a spit. The type and quality of flours used to produce bread could also vary, as noted by Diphilus when he declared "bread made of wheat, as compared with that made of barley, is more nourishing, more digestible, and in every way superior." In order of merit, the bread made from refined [thoroughly sieved] flour comes first, after that bread from ordinary wheat, and then the unbolted, made of flour that has not been sifted."[13] The essentiality of bread in the diet was reflected in the name for the rest of the meal: ópson, "condiment", i.e. bread's accompaniment, whatever it might be.[14]"




I thought it was interesting that it mentioned Greece, Rome, Egypt, and even the exact same person who talked about acne, Pliny. (I mentioned him in the first post.) But, according to Wikipedia, all civilizations ate grains, so this proves nothing.


Who would have thought that bread was so important? It actually made it possible for civilizations to form. Now we know when people started eating grains, but when did people start getting acne? I would think that animals in their natural state would not get acne. But when did we stop being animals? When we became civilized? We became civilized when we started eating grains... Of course this proves nothing. Research can be interpreted however you want. I am just trying to make sense of all of this.

Here's a little timeline from what I got from the reading:
  • 30,000B.C. - Paleolithic Era - People got most of their calories from meat, and the rest from plants.
  • 10,000B.C. - Neolithic Era - Cereals became a staple food; agriculture spread all over the world; civilizations developed.
  • 200B.C. - First mention of acne in Greece, Rome, and Egypt.
  • 1900sA.D. - Industrialization - People use machines to process and add artificial ingredients to all food.
  • 2012 - The end of the world - Just kidding - Many people have severe acne.
I don't really know what to think about all of this. If acne is caused by cereals, then it would make sense for people to have acne in 200B.C. I would think that animals wouldn't have acne in their natural environment, so that would mean that the paleo diet is the way to go. But I don't know if people in the Paleolithic Era had acne. And some people still break out on the paleo diet. I think nowadays people somehow alter fruits and vegetables, like by adding sugar or something, but I'll save that research for another day. Maybe the paleo diet would work if we didn't alter our food?

If anyone has any comments or questions about any of this, I would love to hear them.

Edited by Omnivium, 15 February 2012 - 03:52 PM.

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#3 Omnivium

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 04:53 PM

This link provides some more information: http://www.homeopath...-review-of-acne It says King Tut had ancient acne remedies in his tomb. King Tut lived in about 1300B.C.

The link also said that acne existed in the Vedic kala era (10,000B.C. to 500B.C.) and the Samhita kala era (200B.C. to 400A.D.). So now we have someone saying that acne existed at the same time people started eating grains and developing civilizations.

Now that we have the name of a specific person who had acne, let's examine his diet. http://www.king-tut....tutankhamun.htm This site says:

"Life of Tutankhamun - What did Tutankhamun eat and drink?
Egyptian Food and Drink varied according to status and wealth. In the royal palace Tutankhamun would have enjoyed a large variety of food and drinks served from dishes made of faience, gold, silver and bronze. He would have dined at low tables eating with his fingers. Meat was expensive because Egypt had limited land for grazing as it was needed for growing crops but the royal court and Tutankhamun would have ate Beef, Mutton
Goat, Antelope, Gazelle, Pelican and various other types of poultry. Fish was plentiful and included Catfish, Tuna, Mullet, Perch and Carp. Bread was made in moulds producing a variety of different shapes and sizes and Tutankhamun would have eaten luxury bread which was flavored with honey, nuts and dates. Everyone drank beer in Ancient Egypt, even the children. Wines were a favorite drink and came in different varieties of red and white, sweet and dry."

Here's another site about the ancient Egyptians' diet, but it doesn't give a time period: http://www.ancient-e...ptian-food.html

It says they ate fish, bread, beer, wheat, honey, vegetables, wine, figs, and dates. Meat was a luxury.

Both sources give the impression that ancient Egyptians ate a lot of wheat. I'm assuming all other civilizations did too. The only way for them to be a civilization was to farm cereals. So maybe we shouldn't be eating wheat or cereals? Wheat is one of the most common allergens today...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat Wikipedia says wheat was first "domesticated" in 9,000B.C., and humans may have been eating wild wheat and barley since 23,000B.C.

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#4 Omnivium

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 05:27 PM

It is not known exactly how long humans have existed, but we can just go by the paleolithic era, starting in 2,600,000B.C., and assume people have been eating cereals since 10,000B.C. So that means humans have been eating cereals for 12,000 years. 12,000 divided by 2,600,000 equals 0.0046154. If we convert that to a percentage, then that means humans have been eating cereals for 0.46154% of our existence. This number is off by a little, but I think that we can safely assume that humans have been eating cereals for less than 1% of our existence. Just to put it in perspective...

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#5 Omnivium

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 11:37 PM

Now that I covered grains, I might as well throw in the one other thing that everyone with acne avoids: dairy. http://milk.procon.o...sourceID=000832 This link says people started drinking animal milk in around 5000B.C. Then it spread across Europe, Asia, and Egypt. It even said people could only digest milk because they developed a mutation called lactase persistance. We were obviously never meant to drink animal milk.

This one says the first time a human drank animal milk was around 10,000B.C. http://andyrantsandr...ry-of-milk.html

I would think that people didn't start drinking animal milk until they made civilizations and domesticated animals. So once they started farming and eating grains, they were able to raise livestock and drink animal milk.

I'm not gonna put an exact number on it(the guy in the second link already did), but basically humans have been eating grains and dairy for about 10,000 years, which is less than 1% of our existence. We probably don't digest either grains or dairy as well as meat, fruit, and vegetables.

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#6 Jenny P

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:11 AM

This might sound retarded, but I just learned what the word "cereal" means. Surprisingly, at least to me, it is not that stuff you buy in a box and pour in some milk. I'll let Wikipedia explain it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cereal

"Cereals are grasses (members of the monocot family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae)[1] cultivated for the edible components of their grain (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis), composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop[citation needed]; they are therefore staple crops."

Cereals consist of maize, rice, wheat, barley, sorghum, millet, oats, rye, triticale, fonio, buckwheat, quinoa and others.

This is not some random food lecture. It is actually important in finding out the origins of acne. I didn't get much history from that Wikipedia page, but I did find a Wikipedia page called "History of bread": http://en.wikipedia....istory_of_bread


"Prehistory

The earliest archaeological evidence for flour, which was likely processed into an unleavened bread, dates to the Upper Palaeolithic in Europe, around 30,000 years ago.[3] During this period of human history cereals constituted just one of many food sources exploited by hunting and gathering;[4] palaeolithic European diets were based mainly on animal proteins and fats.[3] Cereals and bread became a staple food during the Neolithic, around 10,000 years ago, when wheat and barley were among the first plants to be domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. Wheat-based agriculture spread from Southwest Asia to Europe, North Africa and the Indian Subcontinent. In other parts of the world cereals such as rice (East Asia), maize (the Americas) and sorghum (sub-Saharan Africa), which are also sometimes made into bread, were independently domesticated and formed the basis of alternative agricultural systems.[5] Around the world, the shift from varied hunter-gatherer subsistence to agricultural diets based predominantly on a cereal staple such as wheat bread marked an important turning point in human history. Though in many ways nutritionally deficient compared to hunting and gathering, cereal crops allowed agricultural societies to sustain much larger populations than had previously been possible, which in turn led to greater economic specialisation, social complexity and eventually the rise of civilised states.[6]
The development of leavened bread can also probably be traced to prehistoric times. Yeast spores occur everywhere, including the surface of cereal grains, so any dough left to rest will become naturally leavened.[7] Although leavening is likely of prehistoric origin, the earliest archaeological evidence is from ancient Egypt. Scanning electron microscopy has detected yeast cells in some ancient Egyptian loaves. However, ancient Egyptian bread was made from emmer wheat and has a dense crumb. In cases where yeast cells are not visible, it is difficult, by visual examination, to determine whether the bread was leavened. As a result, the extent to which bread was leavened in ancient Egypt remains uncertain.[8]

The importance of bread in the formation of early human societies cannot be overstated. From the western half of Asia, where wheat was domesticated, cultivation spread north and west, to Europe and North Africa, and enabled humans to become farmers rather than hunters and foragers. This in turn led to the formation of towns, as opposed to the nomadic lifestyle, and gave rise to more and more sophisticated forms of societal organization. Similar developments occurred in eastern Asia, centered on rice, and in the Americas with maize.


Antiquity

There were multiple sources of leavening available for early bread. Airborne yeasts could be harnessed by leaving uncooked dough exposed to air for some time before cooking. Pliny the Elder reported that the Gauls and Iberians used the foam skimmed from beer to produce "a lighter kind of bread than other peoples." Parts of the ancient world that drank wine instead of beer used a paste composed of grape must and flour that was allowed to begin fermenting, or wheat bran steeped in wine, as a source for yeast. The most common source of leavening however was to retain a piece of dough from the previous day to utilize as a form of sourdough starter.[9]
The idea of a free-standing oven that could be pre-heated, with a door for access, appears to have been a Greek one.[10]
Even in antiquity there were a wide variety of breads. In ancient times the Greek bread was barley bread: Solon declared that wheaten bread might only be baked for feast days. By the 5th century bread could be purchased in Athens from a baker's shop, and in Rome, Greek bakers appeared in the 2nd century BC, as Hellenized Asia Minor was added to Roman dominion as the province of Asia;[11] the foreign bakers of bread were permitted to form a collegium. In the Deipnosophistae, the author Athenaeus (c.A.D.170-c. 230) describes some of the bread, cakes, cookies, and pastries available in the Classical world.[12] Among the breads mentioned are griddle cakes, honey-and-oil bread, mushroom-shaped loaves covered in poppy seeds, and the military specialty of rolls baked on a spit. The type and quality of flours used to produce bread could also vary, as noted by Diphilus when he declared "bread made of wheat, as compared with that made of barley, is more nourishing, more digestible, and in every way superior." In order of merit, the bread made from refined [thoroughly sieved] flour comes first, after that bread from ordinary wheat, and then the unbolted, made of flour that has not been sifted."[13] The essentiality of bread in the diet was reflected in the name for the rest of the meal: ópson, "condiment", i.e. bread's accompaniment, whatever it might be.[14]"




I thought it was interesting that it mentioned Greece, Rome, Egypt, and even the exact same person who talked about acne, Pliny. (I mentioned him in the first post.) But, according to Wikipedia, all civilizations ate grains, so this proves nothing.


Who would have thought that bread was so important? It actually made it possible for civilizations to form. Now we know when people started eating grains, but when did people start getting acne? I would think that animals in their natural state would not get acne. But when did we stop being animals? When we became civilized? We became civilized when we started eating grains... Of course this proves nothing. Research can be interpreted however you want. I am just trying to make sense of all of this.

Here's a little timeline from what I got from the reading:

  • 30,000B.C. - Paleolithic Era - People got most of their calories from meat, and the rest from plants.
  • 10,000B.C. - Neolithic Era - Cereals became a staple food; agriculture spread all over the world; civilizations developed.
  • 200B.C. - First mention of acne in Greece, Rome, and Egypt.
  • 1900sA.D. - Industrialization - People use machines to process and add artificial ingredients to all food.
  • 2012 - The end of the world - Just kidding - Many people have severe acne.
I don't really know what to think about all of this. If acne is caused by cereals, then it would make sense for people to have acne in 200B.C. I would think that animals wouldn't have acne in their natural environment, so that would mean that the paleo diet is the way to go. But I don't know if people in the Paleolithic Era had acne. And some people still break out on the paleo diet. I think nowadays people somehow alter fruits and vegetables, like by adding sugar or something, but I'll save that research for another day. Maybe the paleo diet would work if we didn't alter our food?

If anyone has any comments or questions about any of this, I would love to hear them.


This is really interesting. I never knew acne existed back then I thought it just came a long when we started processing food. But then we need to ask ourselfes how come some people still eat dairy and experience no breakouts?
A lot of cultures that eat a lot of dairy have people with no acne...so what exactly is wrong with US that we get acne when we eat dairy?

Maybe it's just previous generations eating dairy and more HIGHLY processed artificial food to make us more suseptable to getting acne from eating the simplist of things.

#7 Omnivium

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:31 AM

This is really interesting. I never knew acne existed back then I thought it just came a long when we started processing food. But then we need to ask ourselfes how come some people still eat dairy and experience no breakouts?
A lot of cultures that eat a lot of dairy have people with no acne...so what exactly is wrong with US that we get acne when we eat dairy?

Maybe it's just previous generations eating dairy and more HIGHLY processed artificial food to make us more suseptable to getting acne from eating the simplist of things.


Well I wasn't claiming that dairy causes acne. I was just trying to find out when acne started, in relation to diet changes. Acne was first recorded around 2,000 years ago, which was thousands of years after civilization and the farming of dairy and grains. So dairy and grains are possible causes.

As for the people who eat dairy and other allergens without breaking out, maybe those allergens affect them in other ways, or they don't affect them at all. I don't know much about genetics and evolution, but some people can just tolerate things that others can't.

There are a few things that are wrong with "westernized" cultures that I believe make us susceptible to acne. We have horrible diets, we stay in dim lighting 24/7, we don't exercise enough... All of the unhealthy things we do to our bodies make our bodies not function properly, so our bodies are less able to handle acne.

How I Stay Clear:

  • Accutane 5mg/day

  • Probiotics 25 billion organisms/day

  • Cetaphil gentle skin cleanser 2x/day

Low Dose Accutane Log


#8 SDR WellnessCoach

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 05:20 PM


This is really interesting. I never knew acne existed back then I thought it just came a long when we started processing food. But then we need to ask ourselfes how come some people still eat dairy and experience no breakouts?
A lot of cultures that eat a lot of dairy have people with no acne...so what exactly is wrong with US that we get acne when we eat dairy?

Maybe it's just previous generations eating dairy and more HIGHLY processed artificial food to make us more suseptable to getting acne from eating the simplist of things.


Well I wasn't claiming that dairy causes acne. I was just trying to find out when acne started, in relation to diet changes. Acne was first recorded around 2,000 years ago, which was thousands of years after civilization and the farming of dairy and grains. So dairy and grains are possible causes.

As for the people who eat dairy and other allergens without breaking out, maybe those allergens affect them in other ways, or they don't affect them at all. I don't know much about genetics and evolution, but some people can just tolerate things that others can't.

There are a few things that are wrong with "westernized" cultures that I believe make us susceptible to acne. We have horrible diets, we stay in dim lighting 24/7, we don't exercise enough... All of the unhealthy things we do to our bodies make our bodies not function properly, so our bodies are less able to handle acne.


Now you understand. Allergens do affect ppl in different ways. Some ppl wear glasses, some ppl go bald, some ppl have Arthritis, some ppl have Parkinson's, and so on. Depending on how allergic someone is to the allergen also plays a part as to when symptoms show up. We also know Food Allergies were treated 2,ooo years ago.

http://www.thesupera...llergypaper.pdf

and how servere they can be....

http://www.alkalizef...et/Lallergy.htm

we also know how to maybe stop them....

http://www.naturalpa...e-future/7848/1
"Genetics load the gun, environment pulls the trigger"

#9 DaftFrost

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 10:09 PM

Wow this seems very interesting.
I thought so too, I mean bread sure is made out of a crop grown by the nature. but it goes under many process until we can eat it. Our bodies I believe weren't made to eat the product after all that process, its suppose to eat everything that is made already by nature. Fruits, vegetables and meat.

Then that means that rice is perhaps more healthier than grains. Since rice is just rice, its grown and eaten.

#10 cvd

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 10:25 AM

Our bodies become prone to inflammation and inflammatory diseases (acne, arthritis, heart disease, etc.) when we eat too many refined and concentrated foods such as juices, sugars, flours, and dairy foods. These foods are very concentrated forms of the natural foods they come from.

You would never eat 6+ carrots in one meal but people think nothing of drinking a cup of carrot juice that has tons of carrots in it. This is a huge blast of fructose (sugar) to the body...way too many sugars to digest, hence the body becomes inflamed. Yes...carrot has lots of sugar in it. Just ask anyone on a low fructose or diabetic diet. Of course the same is true of all sugars (cane, honey, etc.). The same is true of fruit juices...natural or refined. You would never eat 6+ apples but that is how many apples are in a cup of apple juice. The body is naturally full after eating one apple. Juices trick the body into eating more because you swallow it so quickly and the sweetness is appealing.

And flours operate the same way. They are way too concentrated. There is nothing wrong with eating whole rice or wheat or whatever. The difference is that in bread wheat kernals are ground up --- very concentrated and way more of them than you would normally eat if eating the whole kernals in a hot cereal. Eating bread, either white or whole wheat, is like blasting the body with sugar so inflammation happens. Prehistoric people gathered grains but they probably ate them sparingly because it would be hard to gather eneough for more than making porrage or thickening meat stews. On occasion they may have been able to gather eneough to make small unleavened cakes but that must have been a rare treat.

Milk was meant for babies...it is a very concentrated food source, high in sugars and natural hormones, meant for helping with rapid growth. As adults we no longer need this. Yes, cheese tastes great but it inflames the body. Rapid growth...what does that sound like? (cancer)

Some people think meat/fish/poultry is a concentrated food source. It is. But it is nature's concentrated food source developed especially for adults. It does not have sugars. But to avoid a concentration of manmade hormones, it must be wild and/or organic.

Vegetables and fruits have vitamins concentrated from the soil and the sun. But it is nature's natural concentration. As I mentioned above...in their whole and natural state we only eat so many fruits and vegetables before becoming full. This is the perfect amount of nutrition and sugars for our body.

That said, I firmly believe that there is nothing wrong with a rare refined or concentrated sweet food. Our bodies are pretty amazing and can tolerate a lot of abuse. But daily or weekly or even monthly consumption of foods that differ from their natural unadulterated state is what causes inflammation and disease.

Am I able to follow a strict paleo or whole unadulterated foods diet? No. However I try and mostly succeed. I am now 61, look 40ish, walk marathons, and the only disease I struggle with is acne. I think my acne is purely genetic. Perhaps if I could strictly follow what I preach I could clear up all my acne...but I can't. I like my rice milk (concentrated rice), rice flour english muffins, olive oil, etc. However I do strictly avoid all sugars due to fructose intolerance (which many researchers believe a majority of northern europeans suffer from), dairy, and other flours, breads, etc.

I think research will ultimately prove it is sugars and hormones in concentrated and refined foods that either causes or aggravates disease. Our bodies are amazing but can only take so much abuse before breaking down!

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Diet - Whole high nutrient unprocessed foods.  Avoid oils, dairy, sugars, bread, nuts, alcohol, caffeine, and fermented foods.

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#11 alternativista

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 11:50 AM

Until about 30 minutes ago I was convinced that acne was a modern disease. But then this article came along: http://www.ncbi.nlm....d00581-0015.pdf It was called "The History of Acne". I admit I mostly just skimmed it, but it is about the origin of the word "acne". The article says that the ancient Greeks, Aristotle and Hippocrates talked about acne, as well as the ancient Romans, Pliny and Celsus. They all lived around 2,000 years ago. It goes on to talk about Egypt and even the mark of Cain.

I just found another website, but it looks like a summary of the first link: http://www.healthcar...ry-of-Acne.aspx

On the other side, there's Dr. Loren Cordain, who says you will get clear if you go on the paleo diet.

I'm busy right now, but I will research the diets of ancient Greeks and Romans and Egyptians and whatever else I think of later. I really want to get to the bottom of this, and I'm sure some of you are interested in this too. So feel free to do the research for me and post it. (I know none of you will; most of you readers don't even get an account for some reason. It's free and completely anonymous.) Anyway, if no one else does any of the research, I will do all of it myself.


They were agricultural societies with grain based diets. In addition there was specialization in work (activity) and social classes meaning people had differing access to problematic or beneficial foods.

The earliest archaeological evidence for flour, which was likely processed into an unleavened bread, dates to the Upper Palaeolithic in Europe, around 30,000 years ago.[3] During this period of human history cereals constituted just one of many food sources exploited by hunting and gathering;[4] palaeolithic European diets were based mainly on animal proteins and fats.[3] Cereals and bread became a staple food during the Neolithic, around 10,000 years ago, when wheat and barley were among the first plants to be domesticated in the Fertile Crescent.


It's nice that you posted that. Most Paleo fanatics insist that humans didn't eat grains until they discovered agriculture 10,000 years ago because they couldn't possibly gather enough wild grains for a meal. Which could only make sense to someone who has never seen how grass grows. And so I always argued that they would not have learned to cultivate it unless they ate it. And you can look at the Ojibwe people in Minnesota for whom a wild rice is so important it's considered sacred. And they gathered the wild grains. Not cultivated grains. I have heard nutritional paleontologists say that some believe grains were among the first cooked foods with the seeds soaked and then spread on rocks near the fire.
Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#12 Omnivium

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 06:01 PM

Our bodies become prone to inflammation and inflammatory diseases (acne, arthritis, heart disease, etc.) when we eat too many refined and concentrated foods such as juices, sugars, flours, and dairy foods. These foods are very concentrated forms of the natural foods they come from.

You would never eat 6+ carrots in one meal but people think nothing of drinking a cup of carrot juice that has tons of carrots in it. This is a huge blast of fructose (sugar) to the body...way too many sugars to digest, hence the body becomes inflamed. Yes...carrot has lots of sugar in it. Just ask anyone on a low fructose or diabetic diet. Of course the same is true of all sugars (cane, honey, etc.). The same is true of fruit juices...natural or refined. You would never eat 6+ apples but that is how many apples are in a cup of apple juice. The body is naturally full after eating one apple. Juices trick the body into eating more because you swallow it so quickly and the sweetness is appealing.

And flours operate the same way. They are way too concentrated. There is nothing wrong with eating whole rice or wheat or whatever. The difference is that in bread wheat kernals are ground up --- very concentrated and way more of them than you would normally eat if eating the whole kernals in a hot cereal. Eating bread, either white or whole wheat, is like blasting the body with sugar so inflammation happens. Prehistoric people gathered grains but they probably ate them sparingly because it would be hard to gather eneough for more than making porrage or thickening meat stews. On occasion they may have been able to gather eneough to make small unleavened cakes but that must have been a rare treat.

Milk was meant for babies...it is a very concentrated food source, high in sugars and natural hormones, meant for helping with rapid growth. As adults we no longer need this. Yes, cheese tastes great but it inflames the body. Rapid growth...what does that sound like? (cancer)

Some people think meat/fish/poultry is a concentrated food source. It is. But it is nature's concentrated food source developed especially for adults. It does not have sugars. But to avoid a concentration of manmade hormones, it must be wild and/or organic.

Vegetables and fruits have vitamins concentrated from the soil and the sun. But it is nature's natural concentration. As I mentioned above...in their whole and natural state we only eat so many fruits and vegetables before becoming full. This is the perfect amount of nutrition and sugars for our body.

That said, I firmly believe that there is nothing wrong with a rare refined or concentrated sweet food. Our bodies are pretty amazing and can tolerate a lot of abuse. But daily or weekly or even monthly consumption of foods that differ from their natural unadulterated state is what causes inflammation and disease.

Am I able to follow a strict paleo or whole unadulterated foods diet? No. However I try and mostly succeed. I am now 61, look 40ish, walk marathons, and the only disease I struggle with is acne. I think my acne is purely genetic. Perhaps if I could strictly follow what I preach I could clear up all my acne...but I can't. I like my rice milk (concentrated rice), rice flour english muffins, olive oil, etc. However I do strictly avoid all sugars due to fructose intolerance (which many researchers believe a majority of northern europeans suffer from), dairy, and other flours, breads, etc.

I think research will ultimately prove it is sugars and hormones in concentrated and refined foods that either causes or aggravates disease. Our bodies are amazing but can only take so much abuse before breaking down!


You seem to be only focusing on the blood sugar leading to inflammation aspect. What about food allergies or sensitivities? Do you think everyone could tolerate a normal amount of grains in their natural form, or do you think some people would still break out because of food sensitivities that cause inflammation?

How I Stay Clear:

  • Accutane 5mg/day

  • Probiotics 25 billion organisms/day

  • Cetaphil gentle skin cleanser 2x/day

Low Dose Accutane Log


#13 DaftFrost

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 08:44 PM

It even said people could only digest milk because they developed a mutation called lactase persistance. We were obviously never meant to drink animal milk.


I myself am originally Mongolian (North Asia), I used to go there and once I visited a country side where there are still many nomads outside the cities. They all seem to live healthy and well, and their diet consists of meat, and mostly DAIry!

Mongolia is quite famous for it's dairy, I mean you'll see even variety of food made from dairy that you have never seen or eaten before. I love them.
I've never seen any much people with acne there, nor some terrible illnesses like in America. I don't think acne even exists among the nomads who eat and consume all natural food.

If you know Genghis Khan, who lived to the age of 60 had a diet full of Dairy. Milk, yogurt, cheese and so on... The cheese there does taste completely different though, like it isn't much sour and yellow. They drink even milk tea, and have this some sort of sour hard snack that isn't cheese or yogurt.

SO that could mean that from where my genes are from, my ancestors could be mutated to digest animal milk without a problem. I myself don't see myself breaking out from milk either. Have quit it for 4 months, saw no difference. I realized it was rather sugar.
Also milk there is usually boiled first, as they say that they also extract special kind of cream (which honestly tastes very good btw) after the boil and plus it doesn't give you digestive problems, like diarrhea... and I loved the milk there, the yogurts where more like Kefir, sour liquidish and plain.

Also they consume quite a lot of meat, since they depend on their herds for food, and move every year according to the weather. Fully organic natural Grass fed sheeps and cows. The meat tastes lot better imo, and the fat on the meat is less sluggish and squishy it's more hardened and thinner.

But then again, I think that Meat and Dairy naturally aren't really bad or cause acne but it's what they do to them here in America. Hormones, Grain Fed, Anti Biotics, processing and so on.

Edited by DaftFrost, 22 May 2012 - 08:47 PM.


#14 cvd

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 11:11 AM

You seem to be only focusing on the blood sugar leading to inflammation aspect. What about food allergies or sensitivities? Do you think everyone could tolerate a normal amount of grains in their natural form, or do you think some people would still break out because of food sensitivities that cause inflammation?
es



I think allergies or sensitivities happen regardless. The problem is that allergies and sensitivities are activated much more now because our diet is so restricted and tends to be foods that are inflammatory when eaten in excess (wheat, corn, dairy, sugars, etc.). Most of us in Western society only eat processed wheat products, dairy from cows fed industrial feed (corn), beef and chicken fed on corn and farmed fish fed ground up fish pellets. Think about it...when was the last time anyone served you wild turkey, wild rice, barley, spelt, grass fed lamb, wild bird, fresh caught trout, soup made from wild picked mustard, dandelion, hazelnuts, etc etc.

Ancient cultures had a much more varied diet than we do today and the animals they ate also ate a much more varied diet. For example they ate a much greater variety of grains (spelt, quinoa, wild rice, barley, etc.) wild birds, wild fish and wild animals that had eaten insects, other wild animals, and wild grasses. Do you see where I am going with this? From the bottom of the food chain to the top there was tremendous variety in what was eaten. This helps the body from becoming overloaded with one form of protein...it is the proteins in foods that cause allergies and sensitivities which in turn causes inflammation. And concentrated sugars cause inflammation.

Unfortunately in our world today we eat foods that are both restricted in type of protein (hence concentrated in that type of protein) and concentrated in sugars. Our bodies can't deal with it and get inflammed...we need more variety in our diet. This is why dieticians recommend a rotation diet.

The poster above talks about his Mongolian roots and how they eat mainly meat and dairy. However the animals they eat and get their milk from have been grazing on wild grains. Some of the animals (chickens?) may also be eating insects. This creates diversity and lowers the likelihood of allergies, etc. Plus the human body is very adaptable to a point and the nomadic Mongolian people adapted to a rather harsh environment. In addition, I would venture to say that there are less toxins in that environment and less stress all of which help the body have less inflammation.

Here is another example. My husband is a fish biologist and used to work at a fish hatchery where the fish were kept in crowded pens and fed a diet of pellets made from ground up farmed fish (FYI --- fish normally eat insects, worms, other fish, etc.). The fish had to be fed a constant diet of antibiotics or they would get inflammatory skin lesions and other diseases.

Does this sound familiar? Just like farmed fish, more and more people today are suffering from inflammatory skin problems and diseases requiring antibiotics.

We need wild foods and a variety of wild foods eaten in their natural state to be healthy. This is really the issue.

Unfortunately even if you or I begin to eat exactly like our ancient ancestors we will still suffer from the harm already done to our bodies from the recent generations before us who ate a very restricted diet. Our bodies have become crippled by an overactive inflammatory response. That said, it definately helps to return to an all natural and varied diet. And we will see a difference. I know I have. But it takes time for the body to heal...maybe more than our lives to reap the full benefits. We need to feed our children this way from the beginning.

Status - 99.9% clear

Morning - Panoxyl 4 Cleanser (BP), Cleocin-T, DML Lotion, Physician's Formula SPF 30 Mineral Pressed Powder, Spiro 100 mg

Night - Cetaphil Antibacterial Bar, DML Lotion

Monthly - Professional microdermabrasion

Diet - Whole high nutrient unprocessed foods.  Avoid oils, dairy, sugars, bread, nuts, alcohol, caffeine, and fermented foods.

Supplements - Opti l-zinc, citrical + D3

Daily - Walk, breath deeply, meditate and do yoga daily, wear hats for sun protection 

 

 


#15 Omnivium

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 05:59 PM

I'm learning a lot from your posts. Can you elaborate on how eating too much of the same foods causes inflammation, and how eating a variety of foods doesn't? Like why doesn't the body become overloaded with the same amount of proteins from varied foods?

Also, do you have any more information or links about the farmed fish needing antibiotics? That does sound familiar, and I don't like the idea of antibiotics in my fish.

Is there a difference when you say "wild food" and food in its "natural state?" Because I eat vegetables, nuts, beans, etc. that are in their natural states, but they were grown on farms, not in the wild.

How I Stay Clear:

  • Accutane 5mg/day

  • Probiotics 25 billion organisms/day

  • Cetaphil gentle skin cleanser 2x/day

Low Dose Accutane Log


#16 arqa22

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 07:56 AM

history of acne is only after agriculture, when diet became crap[dairy/gluten etc]..

before that, people ate natural and "clean" diet and had clear skin.











































unless of course they masturbated too much l0l [males]

Edited by arqa22, 24 May 2012 - 07:56 AM.