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Acne Research - Breakthrough!

vitamin b niacin green tea zinc research phenol steroid oily skin

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#1 RedPatrick

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 10:34 AM

Okay, so acne definitely starts after puberty. Various hormones and factors cause it to kick in, but sometimes, it doesn't go away for people like us.

I for one don't have acne anymore since I reduced my sebum production to an extent and got rid of my p bacteria. Oily skin is still a big problem for me.

Accutane reduces oil production and this manages to help solve the acne problem. But it doesn't solve the root of the problem: the cause of sebum overproduction during and after production.

It seems that androgens like testosterone and DHT stimulate the growth of sebaceous glands and oil production, and it won't be a good idea to go on Androgen Inhibitors. However, topical anti-androgens are proven to reduce sebaceous activity - studies done on mice.

That's one way of solving the problems.

What to do?

Get some Topical Anti-Androgens

More specifically, sebaceous glands are not directly affected by DHT, but rather testosterone. Studies have shown that testosterone exerts it's effects on the sebaceous glands through 5ar - 5 Alpha Reductase which converts the testosterone to DHT at the immediate site. Inhibiton of 5ar should theoretically inhibit the production of sebum, and thereby prevent acne.



Inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase activity in human skin by zinc and azelaic acid.

Abstract


The effects of zinc sulphate and azelaic acid on 5 alpha-reductase activity in human skin were studied using an in vitro assay with 1,2[3H]-testosterone as substrate. When added at concentrations of 3 or 9 mmol/l, zinc was a potent inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase activity. At high concentrations, zinc could completely inhibit the enzyme activity. Azelaic acid was also a potent inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase; inhibition was detectable at concentrations as low as 0.2 mmol/l and was complete at 3 mmol/l. An additive effect of the two inhibitors was observed. Vitamin B6 potentiated the inhibitory effect of zinc, but not of azelaic acid, suggesting that two different mechanisms are involved. When the three substances were added together at very low concentrations which had been shown to be ineffective alone, 90% inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase activity was obtained. If this inhibition is confirmed in vivo, zinc sulphate combined with azelaic acid could be an effective agent in the treatment of androgen related pathology of human skin.




Perhaps the use of oral zinc and B6 supplementation in conjunction with topical Zinc Pyrithione and Oxide as wells as Azeleic Acid, could lessen the production of sebum.



Zinc,[5] azelaic acid,[5] β-sitosterol,[6] certain unsaturated aliphatic fatty acids such as gamma-linolenic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, and oleic acid,[7] and a variety of polyphenols[8] have been found to inhibit 5α-reductase activity to varying degrees.


What to do?

Get yourself a 5ar inhibitor. Preferrably topical.


The sebaceous gland

Abstract

The development and function of the sebaceous gland in the fetal and neonatal periods appear to be regulated by maternal androgens and by endogenous steroid synthesis, as well as by other morphogens. The most apparent function of the glands is to excrete sebum. A strong increase in sebum excretion occurs a few hours after birth; this peaks during the first week and slowly subsides thereafter. A new rise takes place at about age 9 years with adrenarche and continues up to age 17 years, when the adult level is reached. The sebaceous gland is a target organ but also an important formation site of hormones, and especially of active androgens. Hormonal activity is based on an hormone (ligand)-receptor interaction, whereas sebocytes express a wide spectrum of hormone receptors. Androgens are well known for their effects on sebum excretion, whereas terminal sebocyte differentiation is assisted by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands. Estrogens, glucocorticoids, and prolactin also influence sebaceous gland function. In addition, stress-sensing cutaneous signals lead to the production and release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone from dermal nerves and sebocytes with subsequent dose-dependent regulation of sebaceous nonpolar lipids. Among other lipid fractions, sebaceous glands have been shown to synthesize considerable amounts of free fatty acids without exogenous influence. Atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis and acne vulgaris are some of the disease on which pathogenesis and severity sebaceous lipids may or are surely involved.




See, some of you guys like to masturbate. Do you know what happens when you masturbate? You release prolactin and cortisol. Testosterone is also elevated for some time afterwards. Testosterone converts to estrogen as well. IGF1 is also increased by testosterone, which plays a big role in acne.

What to do?

Don't masturbate. Simple as.

Free fatty acids are used by the bacteria in order to grow. You have to inhibit free fatty acids in the bloodstream to prevent new acne formation at night when the hormones peak and sebaceous activity increases.

What to do?

Use 500mg Niacin (Flush Version) before bed

Bacteria causes inflammation of the clogged pore. Get rid of the bacteria using an antibacterial and strengthen the immune system.

What to do?

Take lactoferrin 250mg x 3-4 per day
Take colostrum - up to you.
Stop when your acne is gone.

Lactoferrin & Acne



There is a slight problem, you might not want to overdo this and get rid of all the bacteria because yeast competes with bacteria. Rather have bacteria than yeast because it's frickin hard to cure yeast acne. I should know... Been there done that.


Another problem is that certain dietary foods can increase and decrease SHBG levels. Sexual Hormone Binding Globin regulates androgenic and estrogenic binding. Free testsoterone and oestrogen are able to bind effectively to the receptors and carry out their functions, such as converting to local DHT and stimulating Sebum production. Increasing SHBG results in more bound up testosterone thereby lowering the androgenic/sebaceous activity of testosterone overral.



Control

SHBG levels appear to be controlled by a delicate balance of enhancing and inhibiting factors. Its level is decreased by high levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (see:milk). Also, high androgen and transcortin levels decrease SHBG, whereas high growth hormone, estrogen, and thyroxine levels increase it.
However, recent evidence suggests that it is the liver's production of fats that reduces SHBG levels,[1][2] not any direct effect of insulin and specific genetic mechanisms that do this have been found.



Now, testosterone decreases SHBG, and oestrogens increase SHBG. The older you get, the more Testosterone you produce - until your 30s I think, which is when you go through Andropause.

I took some testosterone boosters and some steroids a while back, most importantly oxandrolone which inhibits SHBG potently. Even after stopping oxandrolone, SHBG will remain inhibited for a very long time - 8+ months. Boy, I regret taking oxandrolone now.

What to do?

Green Tea Extract! Drink the stuff or supplement it.


...................................................................................................................................................................



Hmmm, now that we have the sebum issue covered, we should focus on preventing the pores from getting clogged. We can always kill the acne with benzoyl peroxide and our own defense system, but we can't prevent pores from getting clogged.

If the pores don't get clogged in the first place, the sebum that we need to keep our skin naturally healthy, will flow freely onto the skin - just like it should.

WIll update later.

Edited by RedPatrick, 19 February 2012 - 01:47 PM.


#2 bobbi364

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 11:37 AM

Good post, agree 100% with all of this.

#3 RedPatrick

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:31 PM

Good post, agree 100% with all of this.


Thanks!

#4 FSAS

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 01:58 AM

what would you suggest as topical antiandrogens? internal worked for me but i know i cant take them forever. androscience is working on a topical antiandrogen but ive never ever seen one on the market, even asked the doc and he looked at me like an alien :0

#5 RedPatrick

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 06:08 AM

what would you suggest as topical antiandrogens? internal worked for me but i know i cant take them forever. androscience is working on a topical antiandrogen but ive never ever seen one on the market, even asked the doc and he looked at me like an alien :0






~KETOCONAZOLE is the main active ingredient of the Nizoral shampoo (1% or 2%) and it is often used for the treatment of yeast and other fungal infections of the scalp and dandruff. It is also believed to help remove sebum deposits from the skin. However, as it has anti-androgenic and anti-inflammatory properties, it is also often used in combination with other treatments to treat hair loss in both men and women. One study has shown 2% ketoconazole shampoo to be as effective as minoxidil 2% for hair regrowth, indicating that Ketoconazole works as an anti-androgen, reducing the DHT present in the scalp. Nizoral shampo is freely available in pharmacies in most countries. Ketoconazole is also available as a topical foam, marketed under the name KetoMousse. In clinical studies, this foam proved to be a superior mechanism of delivery to the shampoo. Nizoral (containing ketoconazole) is often mentioned as the third component of the Big 3 cures for treating male pattern baldness. It is recommended as a complementary treatment to patients with dandruff and itchy sensitive scalp.


~FLURIDIL is the main active substance of Eucapil, a new cosmetic product for topical use, developed by Biophysica in the US. Male pattern baldness is associated with DHT binding to the androgen receptor in hair follicles. Current treatments include preventing the creation of DHT (finasteride) and preventing DHT from binding to the receptor (spironolactone). Fluridil is claimed to represent a new method of treatment. According to its manufacturer, Interpharma Prague, fluridil blocks activity in the androgen receptor itself. Eucapil was approved as a cosmetic hair care agent for topical use in the Czech and Slovak Republics and can therefore be employed as such in all other EU countries. It is, though, not yet approved for sale in North America and Asia.

Dr. Sovak is one of the inventors of fluridil but a US firm Biophysica holds the patent rights. Dr. Sovak also happens to be one of the founders and chairman of the board at Interpharma Prague, the manufacturer and marketer of this product. All available studies on fluridil were done by Dr. Sovak. An independent view has yet to be made. User references are few and so far mixed.


~SPRIRONOLACTONE, marketed under the trade name Aldactone (as well as Novo-Spiroton, Spiractin, Spirotone, or Berlactone), is a diuretic used to lower high blood pressure. In addition, it possesses anti-androgenic properties as it binds to the androgen receptor in the hair follicle and thus prevents it from interacting with DHT. Hence, spironolactone is also used to treat acne, hirsutism (excess body hair) and hair loss in women. Male patients should exercise caution when using this product, and if at all, they should only use topical applications (see also: Use of Topical Sironolactone in Treating Male Pattern Baldness).

~FLUTAMIDE is a non-steroid antiandrogen primarily used to treat prostate cancer. It is a prescription medicine. Flutamide competes with DHT and testosterone to bind to androgen receptors and, therefore, it is thought that it could be beneficial in treating hereditary baldness. It is a very powerful antiandrogen and its oral use can cause severe side effects, especially in men, where it can lead to a variety of sexual disorders. Oral flutamide is used for excessive facial hair growth in women and sometimes also to treat female hair loss. It is believed that flutamide could also be applied topically to treat baldness in males. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of flutamide as a topical agent in treating androgenetic alopecia.



~RU58841 was developed in France by Dr. T. Battmann and colleages of the Roussel Uclaf Corporation. It's said to be one of the most potent antiandrogens available for topical use, yet does not seem to have any systemic absorption. If it lived up to the claims, this would be a holy grail for topical treatments.

Unfortunately, for unknown reasons, Roussel had not pursued marketing and approval for RU58841. This didn't stopp companies in other parts of the world from synthesizing the same chemical, however. One such company is StopMPB.com Quality and composition has not been verified at this time, but users report that the company sends the chemical in a powder form to be mixed at home. Because of purported instability when mixed, users typically make small batches when needed.

Presently unverified: the rights to RU58841 were purchased by a Scottish company called ProStrakan. The drug is now officially referred to as PSK3841.

~CB-03-01 Is a new topical antiandrogen, you can see the abstract from the CB-03-01 study here-

''The aim of this study was to investigate the antiandrogenic activity of a new monoester of cortexolone, cortexolone 17alpha-propionate (CAS 19608-29-8, CB-03-01). Although the compound displayed a strong local antiandrogenic activity in hamster's flank organ test, it did not exhibit antiandrogenic activity in rats after subcutaneous injection, nor did it affect gonadotropins hypersecretion when injected to parabiotic rats. As topical antiandrogen, the steroid resulted about 4 times more active than progesterone (CAS 57-83-0) and, when compared to known antiandrogen standards, it was about 3 times more potent than flutamide (CAS 13311-84-7), about 2 times more effective than finasteride (CAS 98319-26-7) and approximately as active as cyproterone acetate (CAS 427-51-0). Its pharmacological activity seemed to be primarily related to its ability to antagonistically compete at androgen receptor level; nevertheless its primary pharmacological target needs to be further investigated. Its topical activity, along with the apparent absence of systemic effects, anticipates this compound to have the potential of representing a novel and safe therapeutic approach for androgen-dependent skin disorders.




~ASC-J9 is a topical antiandrogen originally developed by AndroScience Corporation for the treatment of acne, it may be a viable option for treatment of MPB. The currently ongoing Clinical trials for ASC-J9 are for acne treatment, However, the manufacturers plan on seeking approval for it as a MPB treatment as well. The Phase II trials have found it to be a safe and effective drug. ASC-J9 (works for androgen disorders) by enhancing androgen receptor degradation, which reduces androgen activity, this is a unique mechanism of the drug which is different than Androgen blockers such as CB-03-01 or RU58841. This is a novel approach, and the first treatment of its kind, it may yield exceptional results as an MPB treatment, the problem is that it may take 4-6 years before it becomes a readily available treatment which can be obtained from a pharmacy. However, there are Chinese labs which are currently producing it, it can be ordered. I will post the results from the FDA Phase II clinical trials below, as well as an article with more information on the drug.

Edited by RedPatrick, 07 February 2012 - 06:15 AM.


#6 jepooley

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 10:10 AM

@patrick: That being said, which do you use and what do you feel would work the best for someone with mild acne?

Edited by jepooley, 07 February 2012 - 10:12 AM.


#7 RedPatrick

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 11:11 AM

@patrick: That being said, which do you use and what do you feel would work the best for someone with mild acne?


I personally use nizoral shampoo which contains ketoconazole 2%. But, I am looking forward to getting some topical spiro and fluridil. Theoretically, Spiro should work topically to reduce androgenic activity on the face or anywhere else other than the scalp.

#8 jepooley

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 11:39 AM


@patrick: That being said, which do you use and what do you feel would work the best for someone with mild acne?


I personally use nizoral shampoo which contains ketoconazole 2%. But, I am looking forward to getting some topical spiro and fluridil. Theoretically, Spiro should work topically to reduce androgenic activity on the face or anywhere else other than the scalp.

Do you need a perscription for spiro?

#9 RedPatrick

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 11:52 AM



@patrick: That being said, which do you use and what do you feel would work the best for someone with mild acne?


I personally use nizoral shampoo which contains ketoconazole 2%. But, I am looking forward to getting some topical spiro and fluridil. Theoretically, Spiro should work topically to reduce androgenic activity on the face or anywhere else other than the scalp.

Do you need a perscription for spiro?


I think.

#10 Kayjay234

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:27 PM

Ok so can u please tell us all the products to use to get clear please ? Thankss

#11 Myadultacnecure

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:55 AM

I don't have oily skin. Would this work for those of us with normal skin, but still suffering from acne?

Also, does this apply to sex or just masturbation? Do we have to permanently cut these things out, or just until everything is better?