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So Is All Bread Bad For You?

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#1 Pord

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 01:01 PM

Hey,

So I like bread . . . I mean, I Iove the stuff.

From what I have read everyone says to stop eating bread.

Why is this?

Is there any bread that is "good" for you?

Thanks so much.

#2 Chestercool

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 01:13 PM

It is because bread contains gluten, it is a protein which can irritate/inflamme the gut. Also, wheat is highly related to acne problems, same as dairy.

You could try gluten-free bread. Anyways, avoid it as much as possible

#3 Ukulala

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 03:25 PM

It depends totally on the person, of course. Now, no matter WHO you are, eating loads of highly processed, bleached, sugary white bread is ... not a good idea (and is my theory as to why gluten-free has become such a craze -- by becoming gluten free, lots of people just cut out loads of OTHER awful things because of what shit quality bread they were eating before). But for some people (like me), eating a slice of natural, unprocessed multi-grain bread every so often has no discernible effect. Heh, for many of my friends, eating such quite frequently has no discernible effect.

Our bodies are all different. What works for some won't work for others. A lot of people here are gluten sensitive or intolerant -- but that doesn't mean everyone.

To answer what is a "good" bread, I'd say the less ingredients the better. That... applies to most food, really, but I was looking at the ingredients on the loaves my mother buys and just thinking "dear god!" -- it's an entire paragraph! Of multi-syllabic, hard to pronounce words, no less. Why would you want to ingest that?!

So try and find fresh baked multigrain or sprouted bread. I used to eat the Food for Life brand when I ate more bread - it's sprouted, organic, the whole works. You can also make your own, if you're feeling feisty (heh!), or try gluten free options.

People will argue otherwise, but bread itself is not necessarily a bad thing. Just if it's poor quality or you have a sensitivity to a certain ingredient. Posted Image

Edited by Ukulala, 20 January 2012 - 03:25 PM.


#4 Natashagirl

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:09 PM

First of all, you should make sure if you have gluten intolerance ( or celiac disease). If you're negative, then you can try sourdough bread, you can even bake your own guten free bread. Anyways, you shouldn't eat more than 2 loaves of any kind of bread, because it's hard to digest and it's not good for your gut. Try to eliminate all baked goods for 10 days and see how your skin reacts. If nothin changes then probably your problem comes from dairy or some specific food allergy or some other innner problem.

#5 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 12:15 PM

Sourdough bread isn't gluten free.

"Question: Is fermented sourdough wheat bread safe for Celiacs?
Is it safe for people with gluten intolerance, Celiac disease or herpetiformis dermatitis to eat fermented sourdough breads made with wheat, barley or rye? Learn more about current research designed to answer this question and what the research tells us.
Answer:
No, people on gluten-free diets currently cannot safely eat sourdough breads made with wheat, rye or barley flour, even if they are fermented. The good news is that researchers have discovered that "fully fermented" sourdough baked goods, made with a specialty wheat flour treated with specific good bacteria and enzymes did not have toxic effects on a small group of Celiacs participating in a recently published study."

From here http://glutenfreecoo...ds-And-Beer.htm

So if a person is celiac or intolerant, they defintiely should not be eating this stuff. Even trace amounts of gluten make some of us very very ill. I'm not sure what "fully fermented" bread they used in the study, but we should keep in mind that even that was only tested on a "small group of celiacs" and some of us are much worse off than others. We don't really know how fermented the bread in the store might be.

For non sensitive people who still want the utmost health, I'd think sourdough would be far preferrable to regular wheat bread.

Edited by dejaclairevoyant, 22 January 2012 - 12:16 PM.


#6 k3tchup

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 12:22 AM

wheat bread only. i will not even touch that crap white bread regardless of what its fortified with.

i love bread... love bread. its great stuff. i sometimes eat 6-8 slices toasted a day. (wheat only of course) so i would say i dont have an intulerance but there are limits and like the saying "everything in moderation is good"

but what about fry bread used for indian tacos. its homade but in oil, i suppose depends which oil you make it in as well. they had some at work and of course i had to have like 4 pieces.

#7 Pord

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 08:19 AM

So what do you eat instead of bread?

#8 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:14 AM

Meat, vegetables, fruits. I eat mostly raw, no grains/pasta/rice at all. Fruit smoothies in the morning, fruit as snacks, fresh juices, a BIG salad for dinner every night. If I get hungry and need some heavier foods to feel satisfied I have some lightly cooked eggs or a bowl of black bean soup. But usually the juices + the salads + the veggies I eat keep me very full.

Bread is a waste of space in your stomach when you could be eating much yummier, much more nutrient dense foods, imo.

#9 Pord

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:51 AM

Meat, vegetables, fruits. I eat mostly raw, no grains/pasta/rice at all. Fruit smoothies in the morning, fruit as snacks, fresh juices, a BIG salad for dinner every night. If I get hungry and need some heavier foods to feel satisfied I have some lightly cooked eggs or a bowl of black bean soup. But usually the juices + the salads + the veggies I eat keep me very full.

Bread is a waste of space in your stomach when you could be eating much yummier, much more nutrient dense foods, imo.


Thanks for the post.

#10 Pord

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 07:30 AM

Meat, vegetables, fruits. I eat mostly raw, no grains/pasta/rice at all. Fruit smoothies in the morning, fruit as snacks, fresh juices, a BIG salad for dinner every night. If I get hungry and need some heavier foods to feel satisfied I have some lightly cooked eggs or a bowl of black bean soup. But usually the juices + the salads + the veggies I eat keep me very full.

Bread is a waste of space in your stomach when you could be eating much yummier, much more nutrient dense foods, imo.


So if oatmeal is okay what does that mean for granola? Is granola "good for you"?

Thanks again.

#11 alternativista

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 07:44 AM

How 'okay' it is would depend on the granola. Are you making it with quality ingredients or buying some commercially prepared product? Read the label to see how much crap, sugar, bad oils, etc they put in it.

Edited by alternativista, 28 January 2012 - 07:45 AM.


#12 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 08:37 AM


Meat, vegetables, fruits. I eat mostly raw, no grains/pasta/rice at all. Fruit smoothies in the morning, fruit as snacks, fresh juices, a BIG salad for dinner every night. If I get hungry and need some heavier foods to feel satisfied I have some lightly cooked eggs or a bowl of black bean soup. But usually the juices + the salads + the veggies I eat keep me very full.

Bread is a waste of space in your stomach when you could be eating much yummier, much more nutrient dense foods, imo.


So if oatmeal is okay what does that mean for granola? Is granola "good for you"?

Thanks again.


It's up to everyone to decide for themselves, but I don't eat any grains, no oatmeal, no granola of any kind.

#13 amy91

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 07:53 PM

If you're allergic to gluten ( celiac) then you should cut it out completely. If you're not, then you could have sourdough bread every now and again, or gluten free breads ( the ones with rice,corn or buckwheat flour). However, you shouldn't eat bread ( or wheat products) everyday. Even if you do, then no more than 1 loaf of gluten free bread.

#14 Pord

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 05:59 AM

Thanks for the replies.