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#1 FSAS

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 11:26 PM

Hello :) I was wondering if anyone else here is a fan of the bone broths/stocks to help, as mentioned in the gaps diet?
ive been wanting to make a bone broth but the butcher keeps looking at me (tried 3 different ones) like im asking for a bag of cow bones. I used chicken necks one time I found in the supermarket but I noticed the water after 3 hours was incredibly fatty. I guess the necks were pretty fatty even after cutting everything left on, off. I wasnt sure if the bone broths were suppose to be so...oily and I literally felt like i was drinking oil so i chucked it out. tried again with shanks and again it was so oily. Are the bone broths suppose to be so fatty? feels kinda gross thinking i'd have to drink fatty water :/ if thats indeed what it is? I'm a little confused.
Can someone help me out on what cuts to actually use or what to ask for as the butchers are seriously no hope when I mentioned what I'm doing with them and not exactly feeding them to my dog type thing.
Does anyone have some guidelines I could follow when making these as mentioned in the gaps diet? bone broths as so old fashioned i cant believe everyone keeps looking at me like i enjoy chewing on a bone or something ..

thankyou :)

#2 FaceValues

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 01:42 AM

The whole point of bone broths is to provide you with fat. .____.

Just ask for soup bones.

#3 moonbase

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 02:40 AM

The function of bone broths are for the hard to get amino acids and trace minerals. Specifically glycine/proline which are an aid in repairing the digestive lining (and also skin/collagen and joint synthesis). You can skim the fat - especially chicken (I would for any long cooked broth) as the long cooking times will oxidize the shit of of the unsaturated fats. You can also leave the fat on when you store it.. as it will act as a protective layer till you're ready to use it (within a few days).

Edited by moonbase, 05 December 2011 - 02:45 AM.


#4 FSAS

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:12 AM

The whole point of bone broths is to provide you with fat. .____.

Just ask for soup bones.

sorry i didnt know..so the oily-ness is a good thing? So using chicken necks is a good step? and kinda just withstand the oily fat taste? I really wasnt sure what to expect with the bone broth. so the fat isnt a bad thing? (sorry again, just trying to get an understanding).

The function of bone broths are for the hard to get amino acids and trace minerals. Specifically glycine/proline which are an aid in repairing the digestive lining (and also skin/collagen and joint synthesis). You can skim the fat - especially chicken (I would for any long cooked broth) as the long cooking times will oxidize the shit of of the unsaturated fats. You can also leave the fat on when you store it.. as it will act as a protective layer till you're ready to use it (within a few days).


thanks for the help :)
so perhaps I should just take as much fat as I can off the chicken necks ? Or would you suggest a different 'cut' or animal? Last time I cooked it for about 3 hours but as mentioned I felt like I was consuming oil and didnt know if I had done it right so decided to get rid of it and get some help with it first. how much would one suggest to drink per day as I'm definitely using it to help my digestive system :) thanks again

#5 smik

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:45 AM

I assume you eat meat, so just buy a whole chicken then bake, fry, poach, whatever way you want to cook it. Pick off the meat, throw the bones and other bits you aren't going to eat later into a pot with water, set heat on low just below a simmer, and let it do it's thing for a few hours. Perfect stock every time. And yea skim the fat off the top periodically.

#6 kaleidoscope

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 12:05 PM

If you put it in the fridge after you make it, all the fat will come to the top and harden, so you can just skim it off.

#7 spectacled_owl

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 01:26 PM

If you have meat and bones from a good source (pasture raised, not grain-fed) then the fat shouldn't be a problem health wise. I throw whatever scraps I have into a pot and just cover it with water. Bring to a light boil then turn down the heat, cover and simmer. I will leave this simmering for at least 24 hours, sometimes more. You want those bones to be clean. Don't be afraid to go scraping some marrow out of there!

Some tips:
  • When you first get the broth cooking, some scummy foamy stuff will float to the top. It's not fat, get rid of it.
  • Try roasting your bones under the broiler first if you are using raw scraps from a butcher, like beef knuckles and such. This will improve the taste of your stock.
  • Throw in an onion and/or some celery, carrots. This also improves the flavor. Also herbs and spices towards the end of cooking time.
  • Cool your stock completely before refrigerating/freezing it and try to only store it in glass.
If you don't like all the fat, you don't have to eat it. Just remove it when you go to use your stock since it will have solidified on the top.


EDIT: Almost forgot about vinegar. Add a tablespoon or so (depending how much stock you're making, you don't want it to taste too vinegary) this helps everything "come out" of the bones.

One more edit, haha:

If you aren't using quality meats, your stock won't be as great either. I have made stock from conventional chickens before, and well, it just wouldn't gel up. Lack of gelatin and other nutrients I'm sure, since conventional animals never even see sunlight or get to move freely.

Edited by spectacled_owl, 05 December 2011 - 01:36 PM.


#8 clc111

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:17 PM

I made an awesome turkey stock recently. I had 2 turkey drumsticks and 2 wings with meat/skin still on (joint bones are recommended). Covered with cold water and added a TBSP or 2 of apple cider vinegar. Let that sit for an hour. From what I have read, letting them sit in cold water with the vinegar helps to prepare the bones to bring out the gelatin.

Then I added 2 carrots, 2 celery sticks, garlic, onion (leave some of the skin on for a gorgeous yellow broth), TBSP of Hawaiian red sea salt (unrefined with lots of minerals and incredibly flavorful) and a TBSP of black peppercorns. Then I brought it to a light boil, covered and let it simmer on low all day.

If I were to do it again, I would remove the meat after a few hours. By the end of the day, the meat was pretty rubbery. I have been feeding it to my dogs and they love it but too chewy for my taste.

#9 spectacled_owl

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:46 PM

If I were to do it again, I would remove the meat after a few hours. By the end of the day, the meat was pretty rubbery. I have been feeding it to my dogs and they love it but too chewy for my taste.


Yeah, the meat is really no good after several hours of simmering. By no good I mean no flavor. Plus I think most of the nutrition is cooked right out of it into the broth anyway. This is why I usually use bones with not much meat on them or that have been picked pretty clean.

Good idea giving it to your dog, I throw it outside for the animals unless my cats feel like eating it. They're snobs tho.

Edited by spectacled_owl, 05 December 2011 - 05:49 PM.


#10 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 11:38 PM

i have contemplated the possible medicinal claims of broth, and theorized that it is the gelatin, which is basically amino acids- glutamine, glycine, and proline. but its the glycine content of gelatin that is higher then any other food source, apparently, glycine is a major neurotransmitter and i have read some studies glycine supps can send the body into a deeper longer sleep and relax the mind, it is known as an inhibitory neurotransmitter.its also being studied for treatment of certain psychological conditions. thats the best explanation i could come with.

although bones contribute to gelatin formation so do skin and cartilage, its better to make a broth with just plain old chicken, instead of just the bones. or you could buy jello, which is gelatin from animals.

Edited by AutonomousOne1980, 15 December 2011 - 11:39 PM.


#11 alternativista

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:18 PM

Perpetual broth in a slow cooker - blogger keeps bones simmering all week long in a slow cooker.

http://nourishedkitc...oth-youll-make/

I know one thing. It's make your house smell delicious.

Related thread: http://www.acne.org/...22#entry2806722

Titled 'the cure for cottage cheese ass' but includes discussion on theory that lectins damage collagen. And lots about bone broths and the nutrients used to make collagen.

Edited by alternativista, 08 April 2012 - 05:12 PM.


#12 alternativista

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:00 AM

Asian chicken stock from chicken feet one of the best sources of a nutrient rich gelled broth
http://nourishedkitc...ken-feet-stock/

And general instructions for making stock, using chicken feet, etc.

Edited by alternativista, 10 April 2012 - 09:31 AM.


#13 alternativista

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:59 PM

Benefits of gelatin/broths, instructions, etc

 

http://holdthetoast....blowing-my-mind



#14 alternativista

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:51 PM

I bought some beef bones for broth and maybe to try giving to my dog raw, so, Ill put one in the freezer before giving it to him. 

 

Now, I really don't want to brown or roast them first.  One. its' too warm for the oven, although a front is coming thursday I think. Maybe later.  And I don't want to wash a greasy cooked on pan. Also, I've noticed that I don't care for chicken/turkey broth made from carcasses of rotisserie or  roasted birds. I much prefer broth from raw chicken parts simply boiled.

 

Also, i don't really like beef broth.  I do like the beef  broths like they use to make Pho.  I don't think they brown whatever they use. Tendons?. It doesn't look or taste like it.

 

Anyone have an opinion on what difference it will make if I don't brown the bones.



#15 FaceValues

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 01:09 PM

I bought some beef bones for broth and maybe to try giving to my dog raw, so, Ill put one in the freezer before giving it to him. 

 

Now, I really don't want to brown or roast them first.  One. its' too warm for the oven, although a front is coming thursday I think. Maybe later.  And I don't want to wash a greasy cooked on pan. Also, I've noticed that I don't care for chicken/turkey broth made from carcasses of rotisserie or  roasted birds. I much prefer broth from raw chicken parts simply boiled.

 

Also, i don't really like beef broth.  I do like the beef  broths like they use to make Pho.  I don't think they brown whatever they use. Tendons?. It doesn't look or taste like it.

 

Anyone have an opinion on what difference it will make if I don't brown the bones.

 

I'd say follow your own tastes and experiment, you could always brown/broil just the marrow bones or just the veggies. I think the key is to make sure you have some meat in the stock, otherwise it'll just be a pale yellow rather than a more appetizing/aromatic brown (imo).



#16 whoartthou1

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 09:38 PM

I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).

 

What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?



#17 FaceValues

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 02:35 AM

I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).

 

What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?

 

Let me break down bone broths for you:

 

           bones               +      water     +        pot

(grass-fed/pastured)          (filtered)       (crock/cooking, not the kind you smoke)

 

You can make it from any meat, chicken and fish take 4-6 hours whereas beef, pork, etc. can cook for up to 2 days.

Adding a cut of meat will give it more flavor. You can also add vegetables and herbs last-minute.

 

Ground beef and muscle meats may contain some gelatin, I'm actually not sure. But it's not going to be anywhere

near the amount found in joints, ligaments, etc.

 

As a side note, muscle meats should really be an accompaniment to a meal rather than taking center stage. Unless

you do better with more protein than carbs or fat, in which case, have at it!



#18 alternativista

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 06:52 AM


I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).
 
What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?

 
Let me break down bone broths for you:
 
           bones               +      water     +        pot
(grass-fed/pastured)          (filtered)       (crock/cooking, not the kind you smoke)
 
You can make it from any meat, chicken and fish take 4-6 hours whereas beef, pork, etc. can cook for up to 2 days.
Adding a cut of meat will give it more flavor. You can also add vegetables and herbs last-minute.
 
Ground beef and muscle meats may contain some gelatin, I'm actually not sure. But it's not going to be anywhere
near the amount found in joints, ligaments, etc.
 
As a side note, muscle meats should really be an accompaniment to a meal rather than taking center stage. Unless
you do better with more protein than carbs or fat, in which case, have at it!

I do chicken for 1-2 days. But remove any meat after a few hours and return the rest to the pot. Chicken wing, especially the tips and feet make the best.

#19 alternativista

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 06:52 AM



I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).
 
What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?

 
Let me break down bone broths for you:
 
           bones               +      water     +        pot
(grass-fed/pastured)          (filtered)       (crock/cooking, not the kind you smoke)
 
You can make it from any meat, chicken and fish take 4-6 hours whereas beef, pork, etc. can cook for up to 2 days.
Adding a cut of meat will give it more flavor. You can also add vegetables and herbs last-minute.
 
Ground beef and muscle meats may contain some gelatin, I'm actually not sure. But it's not going to be anywhere
near the amount found in joints, ligaments, etc.
 
As a side note, muscle meats should really be an accompaniment to a meal rather than taking center stage. Unless
you do better with more protein than carbs or fat, in which case, have at it!
I do chicken/turkey for 1-2 days. But remove any meat after a few hours and return the rest to the pot. Chicken wing, especially the tips and feet make the best. Necks are good too.

Edited by alternativista, 06 May 2013 - 06:52 AM.


#20 whoartthou1

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:10 PM

I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).

 

What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?

 

Let me break down bone broths for you:

 

           bones               +      water     +        pot

(grass-fed/pastured)          (filtered)       (crock/cooking, not the kind you smoke)

 

You can make it from any meat, chicken and fish take 4-6 hours whereas beef, pork, etc. can cook for up to 2 days.

Adding a cut of meat will give it more flavor. You can also add vegetables and herbs last-minute.

 

Ground beef and muscle meats may contain some gelatin, I'm actually not sure. But it's not going to be anywhere

near the amount found in joints, ligaments, etc.

 

As a side note, muscle meats should really be an accompaniment to a meal rather than taking center stage. Unless

you do better with more protein than carbs or fat, in which case, have at it!

 

I do better with fat... I thought ground beef and polish sausage is not a muscle meat?



I am so confused about bone broths. I am a guy who does not really know how to cook (my grass fed meats consist mainly of just ground beef and sausage and bacon).

 

What type of meat can you make stock from? Also, regarding the gelatin, what are other sources rich in gelatin? Does ground beef have any gelatin?

 

Let me break down bone broths for you:

 

           bones               +      water     +        pot

(grass-fed/pastured)          (filtered)       (crock/cooking, not the kind you smoke)

 

You can make it from any meat, chicken and fish take 4-6 hours whereas beef, pork, etc. can cook for up to 2 days.

Adding a cut of meat will give it more flavor. You can also add vegetables and herbs last-minute.

 

Ground beef and muscle meats may contain some gelatin, I'm actually not sure. But it's not going to be anywhere

near the amount found in joints, ligaments, etc.

 

As a side note, muscle meats should really be an accompaniment to a meal rather than taking center stage. Unless

you do better with more protein than carbs or fat, in which case, have at it!

 

So a person should be consuming organ and bone meats instead? These are pretty expensive compared to muscle meat. What is the muscle meat is 100% grass fed and pasture raised?