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#1 cynic

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 01:41 PM

OK - I know that wholemeal rice is recommended instead of white rice on the GI index (right?), same goes for wholemeal pasta instead of 'regular' pasta...

So, I've been buying wholemeal of both recently, just to 'make sure' a bit.

However, I went shopping today and the store had no wholemeal rice in stock, and instead, only 'American Brown Rice'. I bought it, in preference to white rice, but was basically just wondering if this is essentially the same in terms of how it may be beneficial to acne, like wholemeal is - OR if there's no difference, apart from it being a different colour? bb_icon_confused.gif

Thanks.

#2 evigrex

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 01:47 PM

Is it precooked? If it is, I would try to get a brand that isn't next time. Cooking and especially microwaving certain foods changes the molecular structure, which can cause a pretty drastic difference in post-meal glucose response.

Generally though, brown rice is the best rice in terms of post-meal insulin/glucose response.

#3 cynic

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 02:36 PM

No, it's not pre-cooked.

So brown rice is as 'good' as wholemeal rice then (in comparison to white)? smile.gif

#4 SweetJade1980

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 03:03 PM

yes smile.gif

#5 cynic

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 03:11 PM

Thanks.

So is there any difference at all between the two - apart from the name (bearing in mind I'm also yet to taste it..)? smile.gif

#6 evigrex

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 05:49 PM

QUOTE (cynic @ Sep 7 2004, 01:58 PM)
Thanks.

So is there any difference at all between the two - apart from the name (bearing in mind I'm also yet to taste it..)? smile.gif

Korean rice is the best in taste, I love the fluffy and light texture...great stuff (note that this stuff isn't really considered "healthy")

But brown rice is pretty good, I like it much better than long grain and white rice....the taste is about the same.

#7 SweetJade1980

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 06:04 PM

Hehe, I'm glad you asked cuz I thought they were the same ;-)


So is Whole Grain the same as Wholemeal?

Well, this seperates the two but they are both complex carbs
http://www.netdoctor...rbohydrates.htm

This also seperatetes the two, but it is VERY informative
http://www.baking911...our,grains2.htm


QUOTE
Wholemeal, also called whole wheat flour contains 100% of the wheat grain including the bran and the germ with nothing added or taken away. It is rich in fiber to add roughage to the diet.  http://www.baking911.....GRAIN (MEAL):


Therefore my guess is that whole grain refers to the entire product, like when you are buying grain flours more so than when you are buying whole grain breads. Perhaps Wholemeal is used to identify that it is a whole grain bread. Anyone?


Oh and here's something that's very interesting:

QUOTE
I would like to note that there is a common misconception among healthy-minded people that brown rice is somehow vastly superior to white rice. Brown rice becomes white by polishing that removes a very thin layer of bran from each grain. When cooked, both types of rice contain essentially the same amount of protein: a little less than 3 grams per 100 grams. White rice is a little higher in calories — 130 vs. 111 — presumably because of its higher carbohydrate content (28 grams vs. 23 grams). The glycemic indices are identical at 81. The only significant difference seems to be in magnesium content, which is lower for white rice: 12 mg vs. 43 mg. However, this level of magnesium is quite low, and neither type of rice is a rich source.
http://www.americany...ion/Carbos.html


Isn't it fascinating that some people believe that a magnesium defficiency is what has contributed to Type II Diabetes? Oh and that adding magnesium is what helps reduce or correct this problem. Yet for some reason, the grains that we consume the most in the U.S. have poor nutritional value to begine with! Corn, White Rice, and (refined) Wheat.

Yet the grains that are healthier for us, we rarely, if ever, consume such as:
(in decreasing order of nutrition)

Quinoa - Score of 73
Amaranth
Buckwheat
(Bulgar Wheat - gluten)
(Barley - gluten)
Wild Rice
Millet
Brown Rice - Score of 51
(Triticale Wheat - gluten)
(Wheat Berries - gluten)
(Kamut Wheat - gluten)
(Rolled Oats)
(Spelt - wheat cousin, gluten)
White Rice
Corn Grits - Score of 10


This was a list that the USDA created of the "most nutritious grains" considering their Fiber, B-6, Zinc, Magnesium, Copper, and Iron content! Of course, eating these grains sprouted would also help boost nutrient absorption.

#8 SweetJade1980

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 06:19 PM

QUOTE (evigrex @ Sep 7 2004, 05:36 PM)
QUOTE (cynic @ Sep 7 2004, 01:58 PM)
Thanks.

So is there any difference at all between the two - apart from the name (bearing in mind I'm also yet to taste it..)? smile.gif

Korean rice is the best in taste, I love the fluffy and light texture...great stuff (note that this stuff isn't really considered "healthy")

But brown rice is pretty good, I like it much better than long grain and white rice....the taste is about the same.



Oh yeah, there's many rice varieties. I've found that I enjoy brown rice when I cook it in natural chicken broth.

Say, when you say Korean rice, are you referring the the glutinous sticky rice, that's kinda split in the center? Also, have you ever tried Basamati (doesn't look brown) or Jasmine Rice?


Also, for those interested in nutrient values of foods, this is something a member here showed me:
http://www.nal.usda....oodcomp/search/

Thanks

#9 flipside

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 06:37 PM

"A question on rice"... laugh.gif ... that title makes me laugh... i dont know why, but it does... so i thank you.

say, has anyone ever been eating brown rice and they bite into a piece of rice and then the rice bites back... because of that hard shell around the rice that didn't get removed.

QUOTE
Also, for those interested in nutrient values of foods, this is something a member here showed me:
http://www.nal.usda....oodcomp/search/


ME... i showed you...i did that... all me... cause im just cool like dat...

can you tell im having a good day today? biggrin.gif ... i think it was the back-to-school haircut that gave me a boost... oh, and i just cured my computer from a crapload of crapware... yay!

ok, now back to the rice...

#10 Jaya

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 09:11 PM

wait. wait! sooooooo whats rong with rice now?.............white i mean, its does what with the who now? can u tell me the conecton between white rice and acne, cos if there is one im scrwed eusa_wall.gif

#11 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:20 PM

Brown rice is a wonderful staple food. I love it in burritos with vegetarian beans..or it's also GREAT with broccoli and pepper stir fry....mmmmmm!

*pointless talk of food*

#12 evigrex

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 08:12 AM

QUOTE(Jaya @ Oct 9 2004, 07:11 PM)
wait. wait! sooooooo whats rong with rice now?.............white i mean, its does what with the who now?  can u tell me the conecton between white rice and acne, cos if there is one im scrwed  eusa_wall.gif

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I don't care what anyone here says, there is no connection between rice and acne.

Generally though, white rice is avoided due to its effect on blood glucose. This can cause numerous health problems (in the long term) and weight gain in individuals prone to it.

#13 SweetJade1980

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 09:58 AM

QUOTE(evigrex @ Oct 10 2004, 07:12 AM)
I don't care what anyone here says, there is no connection between rice and acne.  

Generally though, white rice is avoided due to its effect on blood glucose.   This can cause numerous health problems (in the long term) and weight gain in individuals prone to it.

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OMG, we agree AGAIN on something. White rice was what I ate for almost 2 years on my Gluten Free Diet. It is one of the least allergenic foods (but I have met someone that it is problem for) and so its generally safe.

DESPITE what the glycemic index says, rice (white or brown) has a higher amylose starch content (& no gluten) and therefore is actually better to consume than Wheat, which has a lower glycemic value than rice. Corn also has a higher amylose content and this is something else that is my staple. Both of these things are generally not high in fiber (unless you get brown rice), but I guess because of the amylose (or lack of gluten) my Insulin Resistant self handles it wonderfully. I'm now eating varieties of brown rice for the nutrients & fiber, but for the longest time that's what I ate.

Snapback, in case you are wondering, amylose is type of dietary starch found in only 20% of the plant foods we eat. It is harder/slower to digest than the other form os starch (amylopectin) and that's probably why it works to keep your sugar levels more balanced. They actually breed corn to have as much as 80% amylose, but I don't know how much they naturally have. Rice tends to have 5% - 10% more amylose than does Wheat and that small difference (and/or the lack of gluten) can affect your insulin levels severely. So if you've ever heard that diabetics should consume high starch foods, they mean amylose. Yet you've probably heard that starch is nothing but sugar, they mean amylopectin (in 80% of plants foods). See, once again it's VERY important to differentiate between good & "bad" carbohydrates AND good & bad starch.

I would assume that the Glycemic Index or Load takes into account how much fiber & amylose foods have, but it still seems a bit wrong in light of the studies.

QUOTE
Why is pasta included in your low glycemic food plans but rice is not?


The glycemic index of almost all [wheat] pasta is low, while the GI of almost all rice is high. It is very difficult to identify a lower-G rice by looking at the label. The higher the amylose content, the lower the glycemic index. Amylose content is not revealed on labels. Also, cooking methods affect the glycemic response of the rice. Rice cooked too long will have an elevated glycemic response. Contrary to popular belief, brown rice does not have a lower GI than white rice.
http://www.thelivingsystem.com/faq.asp



QUOTE
Cornell-China study suggests rice-based diet
FOR RELEASE: March 25 1996

ITHACA, N.Y. -- A diet based on wheat foods such as pasta, bread and cereal may be contributing to this nation's soaring rates of diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and coronary heart disease, according to a new Cornell University study.

On the other hand, rice-based diets, and to a lesser extent fish and green vegetables, appear to lower the level of blood values associated with the risk of these diseases. These findings, published in the January 1996 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, come from the Cornell-China-Oxford Project on Nutrition, Health and Environment, a massive survey across the far reaches of China that investigates more diseases and dietary characteristics than any other study to date...........

In the past couple of decades, many studies have pointed to insulin as being a common factor linking such diverse disorders as high blood pressure, diabetes and coronary heart disease. Recent research also has discovered that sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a relatively unknown blood protein, is a reasonably good indicator of insulin resistance. Low levels of SHBG are consistently linked to high levels of insulin in the body. Sustained high levels of insulin are, in turn, associated with the development of the chronic diseases mentioned above.

The Cornell researchers, therefore, looked at SHBG, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, testosterone, glucose and 21 different food groups. Factors commonly associated with insulin resistance, such as meat consumption, smoking, and weight were controlled for in the analysis.

"Though other foods such as fish and green vegetables were associated with changes in blood parameters studied, the strong effects of rice and wheat on SHBG were remarkable and unexpected," Gates said. "Women in the northern, wheat- eating counties consistently had low HDL levels, high triglycerides, and low SHBG, all suggestive of insulin resistance. Evidently, rice and wheat can have significantly different effects on the important biochemical parameters we measured." Interestingly, both the rice and wheat consumed in these Chinese regions are semi-refined. Gates stressed, however, that while rice and wheat appear to make the biggest impact on SHBG and insulin, certain other foods in the Chinese meal also have an important effect on SHBG and insulin changes in the blood, and thus ultimately, on those diseases associated with insulin resistance.......   http://www.news.corn....wheat.ssl.html


http://www.nutrition.../bjn0900823.htm

http://www.ajcn.org/...stract/61/2/334

Now, why would a diet study look for Testosterone Levels if it wasn't relevant? I've repeatedly said and provided supporting studies, but for those that don't "get it", if you have high Testosterone levels you could probably have LOW SHBG (which is responsible for lower Free Testosterone levels), which can be affected by your Insulin Production. If testosterone was NOT affected, then why do all teenagers going through Puberty enter into "a state of temporary insulin resistance" so that they can become Hyperinsulinemic in order to produce more Androgens/Testosterones for growth????? So for the scientifically challenged or stubborn, this a way that Diet & Acne are related!

Good to know we can agree some of the time ;-)

#14 OzPower

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 02:31 PM

Brown rice is one of the best foods you can consume, no negative side effects at all, only health benefits.

#15 Aelurus

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Posted 11 October 2004 - 10:53 AM

So does white rice have a high GI index or what? You see, I'm a Singaporean Chinese and rice is our staple food...we eat it all the time! So if this is not good for acne that is cause for concern for me...

#16 Darklord

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Posted 11 October 2004 - 11:14 AM

Brown rice is quite cheap and tastes really nice better than white, and is so much better for u.

Tom

#17 SweetJade1980

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Posted 11 October 2004 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE(Aelurus @ Oct 11 2004, 09:53 AM)
So does white rice have a high GI index or what? You see, I'm a Singaporean Chinese and rice is our staple food...we eat it all the time! So if this is not good for acne that is cause for concern for me...

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Well if it isn't naturally white then it's devoid of nutrients & fiber, but otherwise it's fine. It shouldn't affect your skin whatsoever, plus it apparently is lower GI than brown rice (if you care). Yet, when you say all the time, what does that mean? How many servings/cups? Also do you only eat white rice or do you have other varieties available?

#18 apple49

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Posted 11 October 2004 - 02:17 PM

I eat Lundberg Organic California Brown Basmati Rice. It is tastes really good. My diet which I do for weight control and health is a low GI diet.The diet hasn't helped my skin, and I have been on it for over three years. I can't beat it for weight control, though. And, it relatively easy to live on over time.

#19 Aelurus

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Posted 12 October 2004 - 09:28 AM

QUOTE(SweetJade1980 @ Oct 12 2004, 03:04 AM)
Well if it isn't naturally white then it's devoid of nutrients & fiber, but otherwise it's fine.  It shouldn't affect your skin whatsoever, plus it apparently is lower GI than brown rice (if you care).  Yet, when you say all the time, what does that mean?  How many servings/cups?  Also do you only eat white rice or do you have other varieties available?

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Erm i suppose the rice over here is 'naturally white'...I take it by saying not naturally white you mean it's just brown rice with the husks or something removed? But how can any rice be white by itself?

When I say all the time, I mean something like 2-3 servings of rice a day...at almost every meal(excluding breakfast of course). That's why it's a staple...otherwise it's mostly noodles, the yellow starchy kind which probably has a high GI index. We do have western food, and I have western food not infrequently, but there's the saturated fats to think of...

#20 SweetJade1980

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Posted 12 October 2004 - 11:03 AM

QUOTE(Aelurus @ Oct 12 2004, 08:28 AM)
Erm i suppose the rice over here is 'naturally white'...I take it by saying not naturally white you mean it's just brown rice with the husks or something removed? But how can any rice be white by itself?

When I say all the time, I mean something like 2-3 servings of rice a day...at almost every meal(excluding breakfast of course). That's why it's a staple...otherwise it's mostly noodles, the yellow starchy kind which probably has a high GI index. We do have western food, and I have western food not infrequently, but there's the saturated fats to think of...

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Just an experiment, I would keep the rice, but drop the noodles. I know that some noodles are made with rice (keep those) but others are made with wheat & rice or just wheat. Those cause some of us problems, so those are the ones you should drop. Is that possible?