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Hard & Chlorinated Tap Water

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#1 Vanbelle

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 04:12 PM

I was wondering what people thought about this. Tap water often has minerals, metals and chlorine in it. Water filtration systems employ different methods to attempt to "filter" these elements, but some of these fail (like filtration systems that replace minerals with salt and don't even rid of the chlorine). And even bottled water sometimes isn't even genuinely good spring water, but just tap water all the same.

Then there's distilled water...is buying distilled water even worth it? I don't really care for the idea of hoarding jugs of expensive distilled water in my bathroom. What does everyone think about this? I just started looking into it.

"Chlorinated water destroys much of the intestinal flora, the friendly bacteria that help in the digestion of food and which protect the body from harmful pathogens. These bacteria are also responsible for the manufacture of several important vitamins like vitamin B12 and vitamin K. It is not uncommon for chronic digestive disorders as well as chronic skin conditions like acne, psoriasis, seborrhea and eczema to clear up or be significantly improved by switching to unchlorinated drinking water and supplementing the diet with lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidus."

"Chlorinated water contains chemical compounds called trihalomethanes which are carcinogens resulting from the combination of chlorine with organic compounds in water. These chemicals, also known as organochlorides, do not degrade very well and are generally stored in the fatty tissues of the body (breast, other fatty areas, mothers' milk, blood and semen). Organochlorides can cause mutations by altering DNA, suppress immune system function and interfere with the natural controls of cell growth."

"Numerous scientific studies, however, report that chlorinated tap water is a skin irritant and can be associated with rashes like eczema. Chlorinated water can destroy polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E in the body while generating toxins capable of free radical damage (oxidation). This might explain why supplementation of the diet with essential fatty acids like flax seed oil, evening primrose oil, borage oil and antioxidants like vitamin E, selenium and others helps so many cases of eczema and dry skin."

Help appreciated!



#2 Vanbelle

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 08:19 PM

Here are some "myths" about hard water:

QUOTE
Myth- Minerals in hard water are contaminants.

Fact: Hard water simply means water rich in calcium and magnesium. Minerals are not contaminants, they're nutrients. Scientific findings conducted by the World Health Organization have shown that drinking water rich with minerals protects good health. Clean "hard" tap water is the same as "Mountain Spring Water" found in expensive bottled water. It tastes great and it's good for people, plants and animals.

Myth- Hard water is harsh, fades clothes and dries skin and hair.

Fact: Hard water does not fade colors or dry skin and hair. Typical tap water contains more chlorine than most swimming pools. Chlorine, also known as bleach, attacks the proteins in hair and skin making them dry and it fades clothes. Water softeners remove healthy minerals, not chlorine.

Myth- Water softeners filter water.

Fact: Water softeners don't filter water; they exchange minerals with sodium, therefore converting dirty, chlorinated hard water into dirty, chlorinated salty water. There is still a need for a water filter, known as reverse osmosis to remove the softener salts, sediments and chlorine. A reverse osmosis filter is needed to provide palatable water and is only available at the kitchen sink, not the rest of the home. Many people end up buying bottled water.

Myth- Water softeners are safe for the environment.

Fact: According to Ann Heil, a Senior Engineer with the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, automatic water softeners waste water and can spill as much as 350 pounds of salt into the waste stream per year, polluting waterways and damaging plant and aquatic life. Water softeners and reverse osmosis systems also waste hundreds of gallons of water per household every month. For more information on the effects of water softeners on the environment, visit www.lacsd.org/chloride.

Mineral deposits on glassware and shower doors can be eliminated without a water softener. A teaspoon of Sour Salt in dishwasher loads will make glassware sparkle. AMAZ-Sealant will prevent spots on shower doors. A non-salt whole-house water system that retains healthy minerals works great for drinking, bathing, cooking and cleaning.


And more about hard and soft water:

QUOTE
Hard water can be softened (have its minerals removed) by treating it with lime or by passing it over an ion exchange resin. The ion exchange resins are complex sodium salts. Water flows over the resin surface, dissolving the sodium. The calcium, magnesium, and other cations precipitate onto the resin surface. Sodium goes into the water, but the other cations stay with the resin. Very hard water will end up tasting saltier than water that had fewer dissolved minerals.


#3 Vanbelle

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 09:27 PM

Some interesting things to note:

I'm mainly concerned with the chlorine content. However, some websites say that dead sea salt (which seems to really help acne) contains chlorine. However, after investigating, I see that that there is actually 6% chloride in dead sea salt, different that chlorine.

The chlorine added to water interacts with the water, which I did not know.

QUOTE
When chlorine is added to water, it reacts to form a pH dependent equilibrium mixture of chlorine, hypochlorous acid and hydrochloric acid:

Cl2 + H2O → HOCl + HCl

In aqueous solution, hypochlorous acid partially dissociates into the anion hypochlorite OCl−:

HClOis in equilibrium with OCl− + H+


QUOTE
Disinfection by chlorination can be problematic, in some circumstances. Chlorine can react with naturally occurring organic compounds found in the water supply to produce compounds known as disinfection byproducts (DBPs). The most common DBPs are trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Due to the potential carcinogenicity of these compounds, drinking water regulations across the developed world require regular monitoring of the concentration of these compounds in the distribution systems of municipal water systems.


QUOTE
Water treated by filtration may not need further disinfection; a very high proportion of pathogens are removed by materials in the filter bed. Filtered water must be used soon after it is filtered, as the low amount of remaining microbes may proliferate over time.


#4 Vanbelle

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 09:34 PM

I also read a thread on someone saying that a pool helped clear his skin, and that he thought the chlorine content helps. But it appears that the disinfectant to clean pools is different from the chlorine disinfectant found in tap water?

QUOTE
Trichloroisocyanuric acid is the organic compound with the formula (C3Cl3N3O3). It is used as an industrial disinfectant, bleaching agent and a reagent in organic synthesis.


?

#5 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 08:55 PM

yes hard water with minerals is good. lower rates of heart attacks in some of the areas with the most magnesium.

i drink ice mountain drinking water with minerals added, it is chlorine and flouride free. check the website for more info. i think the water is filtered cant remember.


distilled water is not supposed to be good as it tends to bind to minerals, as far as i remember reading.

#6 Vanbelle

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 11:40 PM

QUOTE (AutonomousOne1980 @ Aug 19 2011, 06:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
yes hard water with minerals is good. lower rates of heart attacks in some of the areas with the most magnesium.

i drink ice mountain drinking water with minerals added, it is chlorine and flouride free. check the website for more info. i think the water is filtered cant remember.


distilled water is not supposed to be good as it tends to bind to minerals, as far as i remember reading.


I do remember hearing that distilled water isn't the best, which always throws my logic off. I've heard that the minerals in water aren't particularly bad, but just the chlorine eh? And yes flouride, totally forgot.

I just bought a water filter and installed it myself. Aka, I have a bad shower faucet now. What do you think of the standard Sprite Filter?

This is what their website had to say about it:

QUOTE
Carbon is a cold water filter. It is most effective at temperature ranges of 50-80 degrees (F). At higher temperatures, carbon becomes ineffective. It will "off-load" and release contaminants into the water. Sprite shower filtration media was designed for hot water, becoming more efficient as the water temperature increases.

Sprite invested a great amount research developing a line of realistic catalytic shower filters that filter both free and combined chlorines, dirt, sediment, odors, hydrogen sulfide, iron oxides, and more, from your shower water.


Safe to say I trust this, as I was reading someone who talked about some filters being useless at higher temperatures.

Edited by Sarah., 19 August 2011 - 11:40 PM.





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