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Autogenic And Biofeedback

fish oil biofeedback autogenic feedback stroke blood pressure stress meditation

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#1 alternativista

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 04:47 PM

Anyone know anything about these things? I don't tend to feel stressed, but I just checked my blood pressure and it was at pre-hypertension levels. Some other people may be concerned about this for their acne.

QUOTE
Autogenic Training
Autogenic training is a technique used for stress reduction and relaxation. It involves a series of sessions in which people learn how to control breathing, blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature.

People learn six exercises that each involve a certain posture (e.g reclining in a chair), concentration without a goal, imagination, and verbal cues. Each exercise is learned by watching a teacher demonstrate it or by reading a description. It requires regular practice.

Biofeedback
Biofeedback is a technique in which people learn how to gain control over internal body processes that normally occur involuntarily, such as blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and skin temperature.

Biofeedback is primarily used for high blood pressure, migraine, tension headache, chronic pain, and urinary incontinence.

Of the different types of biofeedback, thermal feedback (which measures skin temperature) and electrodermal activity feedback (which uses a probe that responds to sweat) may be more effective than direct blood pressure feedback or electromyography (EMG), which measures muscle tension. Learn more about biofeedback.


I am currently staying with my mom who had a stroke so may feel a bit stressed without noticing it. And I haven't slept or eaten as well as I would at home, but have been more active as it isn't brutally hot here. I do have a family history of high blood pressure on my father's side.

I already eat, sleep, exercise right and don't have the other habits like smoking and salt consumption that are common factors. My mother also does most things right although she doesn't eat as well as she thinks she does and just has to have at least one coke per day. But she's very active and prides herself on not being an old lady at 72. Yet she had a stroke. This scares me. I really, really don't want to ever have a stroke.

Anyone have other suggestions for me? I think I might go back to supplementing CoQ10 or ubiquinol and Fish oil. I don't usually because I eat fatty fish and greens.

I am 46, btw.


Edited by alternativista, 05 July 2013 - 10:44 AM.


#2 Wynne

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 04:56 PM

Find your pulse in your wrist. I use two fingers to find the pulse as it is a bit easier and doesn't require so much painstaking situation of one finger to get it right.

Relax and count your pulse. Continue trying to relax however you find the best for you. I can reduce my pulse by 5-10 bpm by concentrating on it. It is a form of meditation, mindfulness. There are definite health benefits to even just 5-10 minutes daily of meditation. You can work this into your routine perhaps at bedtime.


Sometimes just the mere fact of focusing awareness on your pulse will help you begin to control it.

I can't say specifically how you should relax as everyone has a different technique. I just say in my mind, "relax" 'Slower" "calm" And visualize the bpms getting slower. That works for me. I also close my eyes and visualize everything relaxing comfortably.

You will find that working on your pulse will get you into a meditative state and your BP will also likely decrease.


#3 Wynne

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:02 PM

I'm sure you've also heard of progressive muscle relaxation. There are different forms of it, in one I know of, you tense and release the muscle group you're focusing on. In another, you just focus on relaxing the muscle group.

I find that tensing and releasing allows one to actually notice that the muscle is tensed already. It's amazing how cumulative bits of stress (and it sounds like you have a significant amount of stress right now) will wreak havoc on the muscle and skeletal system's tension.

I start at the toes and tense and relax my way up, from side to side. So many people have their tension in the lower backs, and shoulders and even in their arms so it is very relaxing to feel the tension ebbing.

There are also meditations that you can get that are great for assisting in visualizing relaxation. I'd have to look it up, but I think one guy's last name is Zinn, appropriately enough.

#4 Wynne

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:11 PM

Jon Kabat-Zinn is the narrator's name.

#5 Thehoper

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:16 PM

What you described sounds exactly like a fancy way of describing meditation haha. You know I've always preached meditation and training your mind. Buddhists and Monks who have trained long in meditation can change their body temperate at will, incredible mind power.

What wynne said is a great healing way of meditation. It's great for after exercise, during injury, or before bed. Whatever it is you want to heal, you put full concentration on, and have a strong mind connection to allow the mind to heal the desired area. Meditation like everything else requires practice. No one hops into being a great meditator, or controller of the mind, it requires many, many hours of practice. But really anyone who has ever gone far in meditation, will talk the world about it, says a lot. Look around your area for practices in meditation, classes and such. Could change your life.

Good luck with your mom and yourself.

#6 tim12

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 06:08 PM

When I meditate, I either keep my pulse, or count the seconds I inhale and exhale. When I first started, I realized how bad I was at controlling my breathing; I was exhaling too hard, the rhythm felt unnatural, my counting would get off, things like that. As I began to practice, in my deepest meditations I can inhale and exhale 30 seconds each, and I'm honestly no zen master by any means. It gets easier with practice! Here's an excerpt from Ted Grossbart's book, Skin Deep. He's an awesome Harvard Psychologist that's worked with a lot of patients with skin conditions, and these exercises will benefit anyone, skin condition or not.

Utilizing some form of biofeedback in addition to these exercises (or any sort of meditation) is a great way to relax, reduce stress, and improve overall health. Eventually, you won't even have to sit down and concentrate to bring about the meditative state, you'll be able to assume the state (at least partially) by will. Best wishes to you and your mom!

QUOTE
These exercises are based on the power of belief, but it's difficult to believe
they'll work until you've seen some results. Self-doubt will creep in as you learn this
unfamiliar process, and healthy skepticism is only realistic. As you learn to
coordinate parts of yourself you've never used before, there's bound to be a
discouraging period when nothing comes together. Imaging is a skill; like playing the
piano or windsurfing, it improves with practice. If you haven't felt a bit foolish at
times, you're playing it too safe. If you haven't quit in discouragement, then started
over a few times, you haven't really started.

If there's a single key to making these techniques work, it's making sure they
don't become work. Keep your eye on their gamelike quality. They're a productive,
grown-up version of "Let's pretend" and they shouldn't be drudgery or a struggle.
They're not a prescription to be swallowed, not an exercise to do for me, your
dermatologist, or your family, but something soothing and enhancing to do for
yourself.


QUOTE
EXERCISE I: IDEAL WELL-BEING

Just as stress and trouble strain every system of your body, happiness is good for
your health. When you feel at peace and self-confident, when all seems right with the
world, the chances are that all is right within as well. What we're going to do is use
these pinnacles of well-being as a reservoir of good emotional and physiological
feelings.

When you are in the healing state, let your mind range over your life until it
finds a time – a moment, a day, a year – when everything came together, when you
felt good about being yourself, when others were loving and supportive, when your
dreams, if not fulfilled, at least seemed very possible – a spring morning of your soul.
The moment of well-being means different things to different people.

For some, it's the combination of a pleasant setting and a loving relationship; for others, an
achievement that gave a rich sense of mastery. One of my patients chose her first job
as a reporter; being paid to write gave her enormous satisfaction. Another chose the
afterglow of a small dinner party where warm, supportive conversation gave a
wonderful feeling of intimacy shared with his best friend. A financial consultant went
way back to his days as the star of a Little League team that won the New England
championship. A midwestern executive simply couldn't improve on her own living
room, with soft music and soft light in the wide windows.

The important thing is to chose a time and place when you felt the warmth of
good feelings about yourself and your life. Once you've found it, you can go back
there whenever you like to enjoy its mental and physical benefits. Don't hesitate to
embellish an already delightful moment. If your life hasn't provided the right
situation, improvise: imagine what such a moment would be like or idealize a real-life
experience that came close but didn't quite ring the bell.

Sit and induce the healing state of mind and then imagine this scene as clearly
and completely as possible. Let the scene build up layers: sights, sounds, the
sensation of sun or breeze on your skin, the particular light, the tang of the air. Add
detail to detail as the scene grows vivid. For some, the image is a tableau that replays
itself like a tape loop. Others enter the scene and let it play itself out of its own
accord. In any case, let your mind do it; you're simply a spectator, not the producer,
director, or critic of the movie. All you have to do is watch, feel, and enjoy the
benefits.

These benefits include the relaxation response, but the exercise also summons
up and strengthens a wealth of good feelings about the self. Every time you revisit it,
your ideal well-being moment reminds you of your possibilities – who you are at
your best. In ways that scientists are now actively investigating, imagining ideal wellbeing
edges your body toward the corresponding physiological state, a healthy
person with healthy skin.


QUOTE
EXERCISE 2: CREATING THE IDEAL IMAGINARY ENVIRONMENT

Now we're going to focus imagination power where it's needed most: your skin.
Examples of how the mind can influence skin physiology abound. Some thoughts can
make you blush, to take a simple example. In an ingenious demonstration, Japanese
researchers led volunteers sensitive to the lacquer tree (which is similar to poison
ivy) under an ordinary tree that was made up to resemble a lacquer tree. The
volunteers had nearly full-scale skin eruptions triggered by nothing more than an
image and an expectation.

In this exercise, you'll imagine yourself in the environment most likely to make
your skin comfortable and healthy. To begin, take some time and write down
everything that makes your skin feel better and worse. Emphasize concrete things,
such as heat, cold, sunlight, coolness, dryness, friction, or a smooth surface. Think of
creams, ice, warm compresses. Times and places – extend your list to psychological
factors, if you wish. Your guide is your own experience. What has made your skin feel
better? What has soothed it, relieved itching, eased burning and pain?

The idea is to design an environment that will combine everything that's good
for your skin, a setting where all forces conspire to make your skin feel as good as
possible. You may develop this ideal imaginary environment by simply adding
together the things that make your skin feel good and subtracting those that make it
feel bad, but most people find it profitable to let their creativity take a hand. Let the
environment bubble up from the riches of your unconscious. Logic and consistency
are optional.

Your imaginary environment can be hot and cold at the same time, icy
but warm – if this is where you imagine your skin to be most happy, so be it.
Among my patients, the single most popular imaginary environment motif has
been the ocean. One woman who had plantar warts imagined wading in the cool sea
on a favorite beach in Maine; a woman with eczema imagined herself on a hot,
steamy tropical seaside. Airy images are second in popularity. Many people like to
feel themselves floating free on the clouds or soaring through the sky like a sea gull
as the cool air rushes past.

For some, the imaginary environment is a skin-soothing experience at the
center of a psychologically rewarding situation. A violinist with hand eczema
imagined listening to a favorite piece of music with her father in a pleasant, rustic
summer setting and picking up a drink in a frosty glass; the coolness of the glass, the
exaltation of the music, and the comfort of a close relationship with her sometimes
elusive father made this scene triply soothing for her skin and herself. A young man
with hives used the image of a drizzling, humid morning in Cambridge after he'd
finished his exams. The damp, cool air eased his skin from the outside as his freedom
from the usual burden of anxieties and pressures relieved the tension that often
exacerbated it from within.

Remember, you are the sole expert on your ideal imaginary environment. One
does not fit all, and it's not a matter of tailoring the prescription to the specific
problem. A majority of people with psoriasis, for example, find warmth and sunlight
helpful, but for the minority for whom coolness works better, the ideal environment
will be a northern pine forest, not a tropical beach.

Give your imagination free rein to invent an ideal environment; let it include
features that don't exist in this imperfect world (what else is imagination for?). For you, the epitome of soothing relief may be swimming the backstroke in an Olympicsize
vat of yogurt. If cold cream makes your skin feel a little better for a little while,
perhaps some quintessential moisturizing lotion, which concentrates five hundred
bottles of water in a single vial, will multiply the feeling.

You may want to use your experiences with medicated lotions and creams.
Many people get some improvement with steroid ointments but are concerned about
side effects and avoid using them too frequently. Your mind's "conceptual cortisone"
can become just as effective with no side effects.

As with the ideal well-being exercise, the idea is to imagine clearly and in as
much detail as possible. Use the healing state's power to focus your mind and turn
your imaginings into vivid reality, building up the scene in layers of sight, sound,
smell, tang of air, quality of light. If you're walking on a beach, make it a particular
beach, whether Martha's Vineyard or Puerto Vallarta. Is it noontime sun? Late
afternoon? Fresh, bright moming? T-shirt? Bikini? Nude? Whether you're walking,
sitting, or lying down, imagine the feeling in your muscles and joints, the body
consciousness that belongs to the activity. Imagine the visceral sensation of peace or
excitement that goes along with dawn in the mountains or sunset on rocks sprayed
by pounding surf. This is an exercise for the poet in you.

The more real you imagine the ideal imaginary environment, the more real the
physiological changes that belong to it will be. These are valuable in two ways. First
is simple symptom relief. The idea of this exercise is to imagine conditions and
situations that will make your skin feel better, make the itching stop, ease the
burning and the pain. This relief usually lingers for well beyond the exercise time
itself. The exercise also nudges your skin's physiology toward a healthier state. A
world full of things that your skin likes is also a world full of whatever your skin,
disease dislikes: an internal climate less hospitable to illness.

Very slight physiological changes can have large results. I call this the
Houseplant Effect in honor of the exquisite sensitivity displayed by many of the
creatures with which we share our homes. A plant that shrivels and withers in a
sunny window may do fine if you alter its living conditions slightly and put it in
partial shade; another will perk up and thrive in a corner that's five degrees warmer
(or cooler) than the corner where it seemed destined for geranium heaven.

I made the point earlier that a chronic skin problem is often a matter of delicate
balance – it's a disease that never gets completely better or continually worse.
Anything that will nudge the balance toward health can make a critical difference; as
with a houseplant, a slight change in the physiological environment may turn the
trick. The small but real bodily changes that accompany the ideal imaginary
environment can make life that much less easy for the virus, bacteria, or
inflammatory process that is bedeviling your skin.

There's no rigid prescription for the ideal imaginary environment. Simply enter
the healing state and remain in the environment as long as it feels right – five, ten, or
twenty minutes. Repeat the exercise as often as you have the time and need the relief
it brings. Many people find that practice brings speed and depth; the more you do the
exercise, the more easily you find and enter the ideal environment. Your body
becomes conditioned to the rhythm of the procedure and will move smoothly from
one step to the next.

After you've begun to feel at home in the ideal imaginary environment, you may
find it possible to enter it briefly almost at will. In addition to your regular sessions,
summon the image up to flash through your mind dozens of times a day whenever
you need it, a healing resource of inestimable value.

An Additional Technique

Some patients have successfully used a variant of the ideal imaginary environment
inspired by a technique used for pain control. Imagine your hand filled to the brim
with the most healing and soothing sensations imaginable. In effect, concentrate all
the best features, the most comforting feelings, of the ideal imaginary environment,
distilled to their essence, and pour them into the hand. When that feeling is real and
full in the hand, pass it lightly over troubled areas of your skin. Imagine the healing,
soothing sensation pouring forth from your fingertips, suffusing and flowing over
them, leaving no room for itching, burning, or pain. When the healing sensations
begin to run out, simply withdraw the hand for a few moments, let it fill up again, and
then replace it on the affected area for renewed relief.xlvii


QUOTE
EXERCISE 3: THE CELLULAR BATTLE

Your skin disorder can be thought of as a battle: the virus or bacteria against your
body's immune system (as in herpes, shingles, and warts) or simply the forces of
health against whatever it is that is disrupting your body's natural good order. In this
last self-fulfilling prophecy exercise, you will visualize the forces of health
themselves, right among the cells, and encourage them by imagining them
overcoming whatever foreign agent or disordered process is causing your skin grief.

For inspiration, consider work that has been done with cancer patients.
Pioneering doctors such as Simonton and associates in Texas guide their patients to
imagine the struggle that is taking place between cancer cells and their bodies'
defense forces. The patients are encouraged to personalize the struggle, to come up
with meaningful images of cancer cells and the immune cells and other forces that
oppose them: white knights against gray, greasy goblins, for example. In theory,
imagining the power and potency of the body's defenses as victorious may
strengthen the forces of health, much as grief and depression weaken immune
functions.

I've used a similar technique with my herpes patients. Herpes recurrences
reflect a struggle between a virus and the immune system. When the immune system
is stronger, the virus is kept in its place; when the virus gets the upper hand, it comes
out of its hiding places and into an active lesion. (The same process occurs in shingles
and warts.)

I ask my herpes patients to imagine what the struggle looks like, what the
herpes virus is like, to them, and what kinds of forces oppose them. Using the focused
power of the healing state, they image the battle with the forces of health victorious.
Images on the cellular level are as personal as the well-being and ideal environment
images. A professor saw the virus as little asterisks and his body
washing them away like a fire hydrant with a gush of water. A dress designer saw thevirus as long fish, and the body's defenses as swordfish that swim up alongside and
skewer them. To an artist, the virus was black and brittle, like freeze-dried coffee, to
be burned by his body and flushed away.

The essential process is making the struggle real and finding a way to
participate in it actively to aid your own body in getting well. Your body's drive
toward life and health is mysterious – no one knows exactly what the forces are and
how they work. Here is a way to make them concrete and encourage them.
This exercise may be applied to any skin problem. It helps to have a notion of
the physiology of the disease; knowing just what is or may be going wrong helps you
envision your body's efforts to stop the process and correct the disorder.

Psoriasis, for example, involves the rapid growth of cells that come to the surface of the skin
before they're fully mature. One patient imagined them being "half-cooked" and
served up by a short-order cook under pressure from his boss. His healing image was
simply a more understanding boss, who encouraged the cook to slow down.
A woman with hyperhidrosis – excessive perspiration – imagined a small,
lovable cleaning woman with a mop who relentlessly mopped up excess perspiration
inside the cells themselves, leaving her skin clean and dry.

A patient with recurrent skin infections imagined each one as the wound of an
arrow, then imagined a transparent shield between her skin and the slings and
arrows of daily life. Everything shot at her bounced off the shield, which had an
added psychological meaning: while she was growing up, her often sadistic parents
continually shot barbs of verbal and physical abuse at her.

Your images can be as close to or as far from physiological reality (as you
understand it) as you wish, as long as they are a personally meaningful way to make
the struggle concrete and tilt in your favor. A scientifically inclined person may image
viruses as they appeared in his college biology textbook, with anatomically correct
lymphocytes their conquering enemy. A more mathematical imagination may see the
viruses as polyhedral soccer balls to be deflated by a man with a needle. You may
contrive a full-scale drama with little people dressed up as cells and body parts, á la
Woody Allen's Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to
Ask).

In any case, keep in mind how powerful your body's healthful forces are – and
remember how they routinely protect you from all manner of viruses and bacteria
that thickly inhabit the world we live in. Aid this already powerful system by
imagining allies that you endow with everything you consider strongest and most
powerful in yourself. Concentrate the power you already have and bring it to bear in
the struggle.

Edited by tim12, 05 August 2011 - 06:35 PM.


#7 alternativista

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 06:54 AM

Thanks. I will try taking my pulse and slowing down at bedtime and maybe a few times per day.

I prefer walking to meditation, but have been meaning to make chanting ohm during the walk a habit. It's good for the sinuses.

Since you've provided biofeedback info, here's the wiki on autogenic training and the autogenictraining.org site. I haven't read them yet:

http://en.wikipedia....ogenic_training

http://www.autogenictraining.org/


Edited by alternativista, 05 July 2013 - 01:17 PM.


#8 Thehoper

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 07:04 AM

Wow that was long, some good points in there. It's a really interesting concept, imagining the strong forces inside you physically battling your disease in a physical form. However which way, either actual battle like the one man, or shooting arrows and each individual antagonist like the woman, or the other woman who used a maid to clean up all her "trash" lol.

Using the mind to combat your problem is a really great approach. After reading the thing that came to mind, was that the first killer of these experiences would be a mirror. Someone who goes through an intense session of this meditation, then awakens, looks in a mirror and doesn't see the instant progess like in the meditation, will get turned right off.

This would work best if you were away from all mirrors for a couple days, a week, or whatever, longer the better. Say camping for example. Daily you have these meditations, and your mind never has that mirror to shut down all its progress. Your making your own mind believe your having amazing success, and then through those couple of days/week, your mind finally has the time to REALLY combat your problem. I bet people could have amazing success through that. Man I'd like to open up my own dermatology clinic haha.

#9 alternativista

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 08:31 AM

FYI:


QUOTE
In a report published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers found that almost 11 percent of seemingly healthy, middle-aged study participants had some brain damage from one or more “silent†strokes. The researchers also found a correlation between silent stroke and cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, and thickening or partial blockage of the carotid arteries.


Also known as silent cerebral infarction, a silent stroke is a true stroke that causes actual brain injury without any noticeable symptoms. People who’ve had a silent stroke have a higher risk of having more strokes, and are more likely to suffer from vascular dementia later in life.

This finding may sound ominous, but the study’s authors point out the good news: Early detection and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors can decrease the risk of stroke.

Read more: http://www.care2.com...l#ixzz1UjJx7HHf


Also, as further proof that you can't follow FDA or other conventional guidelines for info on health, food and safety:


 


The federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest an upper limit of 25 percent of daily calories come from added sugar. Doesn’t that seem really high? If you have an extra 500 calories to spare, wouldn’t it be wise to spend it on something with some nutritive value? Aside from a waste of calories, a new study shows that adults who consume high levels of sugar have significantly elevated levels of several risk factors for heart disease....

As described in the UC Davis news, the researchers examined 48 adult participants between the ages of 18 and 40 years. For five weeks before the study, subjects were asked to limit daily consumption of sugar-containing beverages to one 8-ounce serving of fruit juice. The participants were then divided into three groups, each group consuming 25 percent of their daily calories as fructose, high fructose corn syrup or glucose. The researchers found that within two weeks, study participants consuming fructose or high fructose corn syrup exhibited increased bloodstream concentrations of three known risk factors for heart disease: LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and a protein known as apolipoprotein-B, which can lead to plaque buildup in arteries.

The American Heart Association recommends that people consume only five percent of their daily calories as added sugar. How much added sugar do you consume?


Read more: http://www.care2.com...l#ixzz1UjML21uL

 



Apolipoprotein B (APOB or ApoB) is the primary apolipoprotein of low-density lipoproteins (LDL or "bad cholesterol"), which is responsible for carrying cholesterol to tissues. While it is unclear exactly what functional role APOB plays in LDL, it is the primary apolipoprotein component and is absolutely required for its formation. What is clear is that the APOB on the LDL particle acts as a ligand for LDL receptors in various cells throughout the body (i.e. less formally, APOB "unlocks" the doors to cells and thereby delivers cholesterol to them). Through a mechanism that is not fully understood, high levels of APOB can lead to plaques that cause vascular disease (atherosclerosis), leading to heart disease. There is considerable evidence that levels of APOB are a better indicator of heart disease risk than total cholesterol or LDL. However, primarily for historic reasons, cholesterol, and more specifically, LDL-cholesterol, remains the primary lipid test for the risk factor of atherosclerosis

 

from wikipedia on APOB:

 large numbers of lipoprotein particles, and, in particular large numbers of LDL particles, lead to competition at the ApoB100 receptor (i.e. LDL receptor) of peripheral cells. Since such a competition will prolong the residence time of LDL particles in the circulation, it may lead to greater opportunity for them to undergo oxidation and/or other chemical modifications. Such modifications may lessen the particles' ability to be cleared by the classic LDL receptor and/or increase their ability to interact with so-called "scavenger" receptors.


Edited by alternativista, 14 March 2013 - 02:49 PM.


#10 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 10:46 AM

you said she had to have a coke a day right?

i think i remember hearing from some studys about negative effects on triglycerides and hdl/ldl ratios from the overconsumption of high fructose corn syrup.


these claims may need to be verified, but here is just some information about fructose.

QUOTE
What happens if I consume too much fructose?

Most of the carbohydrates we eat are made up of chains of glucose. When glucose enters the bloodstream, the body releases insulin to help regulate it. Fructose, on the other hand, is processed in the liver. To greatly simplify the situation: When too much fructose enters the liver, the liver can't process it all fast enough for the body to use as sugar. Instead, it starts making fats from the fructose and sending them off into the bloodstream as triglycerides.
Why is this bad?

This is potentially bad for at least three reasons:
High blood triglycerides are a risk factor for heart disease.
Fructose ends up circumventing the normal appetite signaling system, so appetite-regulating hormones aren't triggered--and you're left feeling unsatisfied. This is probably at least part of the reason why excess fructose consumption is associated with weight gain.
There is growing evidence that excess fructose consumption may facilitate insulin resistance, and eventually type 2 diabetes. However, some of this effect may be from chemicals in soda which reacts with the high fructose corn syrup.


Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Increase Nonfasting Triglycerides In Obese Adults
http://www.scienceda...90212161819.htm


Effects of dietary fructose or glucose on triglyceride production and lipogenic enzyme activities in the liver of Wistar fatty rats, an animal model of NIDDM
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9228459


The Interaction Between Dietary Fructose and Magnesium Adversely Affects Macromineral Homeostasis in Men
http://www.jacn.org/...9/1/31.abstract

Hypomagnesemia is linked to low serum HDL-cholesterol irrespective of serum glucose values
http://www.jdcjourna...0127-6/abstract


turmeric and fibrinogen
http://www.vrp.com/b...lar-risk-factor

Edited by AutonomousOne1980, 11 August 2011 - 10:55 AM.


#11 alternativista

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 06:46 AM

QUOTE (AutonomousOne1980 @ Aug 11 2011, 11:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
you said she had to have a coke a day right?

i think i remember hearing from some studys about negative effects on triglycerides and hdl/ldl ratios from the overconsumption of high fructose corn syrup.


Yep. Also likely affecting her bones as her fractured ankle isn't healing at all yet and it's been nearly 4 weeks. She hasn't been allowed to put weight on it slowing her rehab and release. It had been in a cast boot and yesterday they put a cast on it and in another 2 weeks if there's no healing, they want to do surgery to put in screws to pull the bones together. Which she really didn't want, but maybe now the fact that she isn't healing will changer her mind. Hopefully about the coke too, as I keep telling her she needs more vitamin D, magnesium and other nutrients besides her calcium supplement and to not do things that deplete calcium from the bones.

They scanned her carotid artery and aorta to look for plaque/clogs and I've been told by a nurse that it looks 'fine' but I haven't spoken to the doctors as that was done at a different hospital from where she'd doing rehab and the doctor here overseeing her rehab is of no use.

I'd like to try to teach them to make curry as I think the only tumeric they eat is from mustard (and she usually uses mayo) and pickles as it's a spice used in pickle making. There's all kinds of anti-inflammatory foods/herbs she could be eating much more of. I've told her that chamomile tea has the added benefit of thinning the blood but she's always claimed to not like herbal tea. Period. Like she's tried them all and found that there's only one plant in all the world that can be used to make good tea. She's on a blood thinner, and her brother is on one as well and has been told to avoid foods with vitamin K! I tell her not to take medication that means you can't have important nutrients. Except temporarily in an acute case, of course.

#12 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 09:58 AM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Aug 12 2011, 06:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (AutonomousOne1980 @ Aug 11 2011, 11:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
you said she had to have a coke a day right?

i think i remember hearing from some studys about negative effects on triglycerides and hdl/ldl ratios from the overconsumption of high fructose corn syrup.


Yep. Also likely affecting her bones as her fractured ankle isn't healing at all yet and it's been nearly 4 weeks. She hasn't been allowed to put weight on it slowing her rehab and release. It had been in a cast boot and yesterday they put a cast on it and in another 2 weeks if there's no healing, they want to do surgery to put in screws to pull the bones together. Which she really didn't want, but maybe now the fact that she isn't healing will changer her mind. Hopefully about the coke too, as I keep telling her she needs more vitamin D, magnesium and other nutrients besides her calcium supplement and to not do things that deplete calcium from the bones.

They scanned her carotid artery and aorta to look for plaque/clogs and I've been told by a nurse that it looks 'fine' but I haven't spoken to the doctors as that was done at a different hospital from where she'd doing rehab and the doctor here overseeing her rehab is of no use.

I'd like to try to teach them to make curry as I think the only tumeric they eat is from mustard (and she usually uses mayo) and pickles as it's a spice used in pickle making. There's all kinds of anti-inflammatory foods/herbs she could be eating much more of. I've told her that chamomile tea has the added benefit of thinning the blood but she's always claimed to not like herbal tea. Period. Like she's tried them all and found that there's only one plant in all the world that can be used to make good tea. She's on a blood thinner, and her brother is on one as well and has been told to avoid foods with vitamin K! I tell her not to take medication that means you can't have important nutrients. Except temporarily in an acute case, of course.



i think i remember hearing something about people who are on blood thinners for a long time have calcium regulatory/transport issues because the of the mechanism of action of blood thinners on certain vitamin k proteins. or rather, to thin the blood they must deactivate some clotting factors, which i think are vitamin k dependant enzymes, which i think the same enzymes transport calcium into bone and discourage deposition in the vascular system. so they should not ever be considered long term, but im not sure if this applys to this particular situation and this particular blood thinner, just trying to pass some general info your way. also dont quote me word for word, this is all from my memory which may not be that reliable at the moment. i wonder if the delayed healing of the bone that is broken has anything to do with this. look for studies showing any link between rates of osteoperosis/bone loss/reduced bone density and blood thinners.

aspirin is another blood thinning option that is super safe.
fish oil is also another option.



here is a cool study on vitamin c and its ability to lower ldl cholesterol and triglycerides.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2682928/

also niacin has been used to raise hdl for many years, i think its actually more effective then any of the statins on the market, from what i remember reading anyways, as well as safer then statins. One of the prescription brand names is niaspan, they have commercials for it once in a while.

Edited by AutonomousOne1980, 12 August 2011 - 10:04 AM.


#13 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 10:35 AM

here is some more info, im interested in this stuff too so i suppose ill help gather info.

Vitamin K, Warfarin and oral anticoagulants
Vitamin K is an essential co-factor for the synthesis of several coagulation factors. Oral anticoagulants competitively inhibit enzymes that participate in vitamin K metabolism. Vitamin K intake of more than 250 mcg/day decreases warfarin sensitivity in anticoagulated patients consuming regular diets. For each increase in 100 mcg of vitamin K intake, the INR may be reduced by 0.2. Some over-the-counter multivitamin supplements contain enough vitamin K1 to significantly alter coagulation parameters.
The long-term use of warfarin, known as the product name Coumadin, a drug commonly prescribed to reduce the risk of blood clots, appears to increase the risk of fractures associated with osteoporosis, a bone-thinning condition that usually increased with age. Warfarin prevents coagulation by blocking vitamin K, which is needed to activate certain clotting factors. Because vitamin K is also used to activate proteins involved in bone formation, drugs like warfarin may increase the risk of fractures.
A dose of 1-2.5mg of oral phytomenadione ( vitamin K1 ), reduces the range of INR from 5.0-9.0 to 2.0-5.0 within 24-48 hours in those who have had excess anticoagulation. However, I suggest you also review the study below:

Although it is safe, low-dose vitamin K used to treat warfarin recipients with high INRs (international normalized ratios) does not reduce episodes of bleeding. "Our results support the practice of treating patients with INRs between 4.5 and 10.0 with simple warfarin therapy withdrawal and reinstitution once the INR has decreased into the desired range," says Dr. Mark A Crowther, at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. The investigators note that warfarin's dose-response characteristics are highly unpredictable, frequently leading to elevated INRs and increased risk for bleeding, particularly intracranial bleeding. They studied the effects of oral vitamin K on clinical outcomes in over-anticoagulated patients with INRs between 4.5 and 10. The subjects were instructed to withhold warfarin for 1 day and were randomly assigned to vitamin K 1.25 mg or to placebo. The day after treatment, mean INR had decreased significantly more in the vitamin K group than the placebo group. However, there were no significant differences in the percentages of patients who had at least one bleeding complication within 7 days (8% in the vitamin K group vs 9% in the placebo group) or within 90 days (15% vs 16%). There were also no significant differences in 90-day rates of thromboembolism or death. Similarly, the number of patients experiencing a major bleeding event -- defined as fatal bleeding, bleeding requiring therapeutic intervention or transfusion of 2 or more units of red blood cells, or objectively confirmed bleeding into an enclosed space -- was similar in the two groups at day 90 (2.5% treated with vitamin K vs 1.1% treated with placebo). Dr. Crowther's team cautions that their findings "should not be applied to patients who present with active bleeding, those who require acute normalization of their INR (because of imminent surgery, for example), or those with INRs greater than 10.0." Ann Intern Med 2009.

#14 alternativista

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 08:52 PM

Thanks for all that research. She's only been on the blood thinners since the stroke so I doubt they they are to blame for the fracture, but maybe it's affecting the healing, along with the calcium depleting sodas. She claims she's been taking fish oil. She used to take aspirin for frequent headaches, but i only see tylenol around the house. But I think she's been doing the low dose aspirin thing. And in the hospital they give her calcium and a multi plus the drugs, but no fish oil, no other nutrients needed to use calcium like D and magnesium of which there is usually very little in a multi. And there's probably no where near the C needed. And the veggies served are not the most nutrient dense and are overcooked. I bring here raw stuff-berries, tomatoes, spinach, etc.

I know she wants off all the drugs, but she said that about the prednisone when she was first prescribed it for polymyalgia rheumatica and I told her to eat more anti-inflammatory foods, take fish oil and cut out the soda. And yet she's still on it. And prednisone side effects include osteoporosis, high blood pressure, poor healing and muscle weakness. But her doctors aren't concerned about it.

Edited by alternativista, 12 August 2011 - 08:54 PM.


#15 AutonomousOne1980

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 11:16 AM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Aug 12 2011, 09:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for all that research. She's only been on the blood thinners since the stroke so I doubt they they are to blame for the fracture, but maybe it's affecting the healing, along with the calcium depleting sodas. She claims she's been taking fish oil. She used to take aspirin for frequent headaches, but i only see tylenol around the house. But I think she's been doing the low dose aspirin thing. And in the hospital they give her calcium and a multi plus the drugs, but no fish oil, no other nutrients needed to use calcium like D and magnesium of which there is usually very little in a multi. And there's probably no where near the C needed. And the veggies served are not the most nutrient dense and are overcooked. I bring here raw stuff-berries, tomatoes, spinach, etc.

I know she wants off all the drugs, but she said that about the prednisone when she was first prescribed it for polymyalgia rheumatica and I told her to eat more anti-inflammatory foods, take fish oil and cut out the soda. And yet she's still on it. And prednisone side effects include osteoporosis, high blood pressure, poor healing and muscle weakness. But her doctors aren't concerned about it.



i was going to say that about the prednisone as well, ive heard that negatively affects calcium balance and such. looks like there are multiple challenges to building that bone back up for sure.

if the polymyalgia pain is not too severe, perhaps it would be good to stop pred for a few weeks to see if that helps. but if the pain interrupts sleep, then it may be better to stay on it, or even perhaps switch to some other type of pain killer for a while like an opiate, asuming the side effects arent the same, besides potential addiction. or maybe a stronger form of tylenol is something to try instead of pred.

Edited by AutonomousOne1980, 13 August 2011 - 11:22 AM.


#16 alternativista

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 07:45 PM

Back to biofeedback.

Yesterday on Dr. Oz Deepak Chopra had a meditation to get rid of headache that I thought was a good technique. He said to hold out your hands palms up and close your eyes, breath and focus on your heart beating for a bit, then move to the tips of you fingers and supposedly you can focus on the pulse in your finger tips. And supposedly this takes all the energy away from the headache. And even if not, I thought it was as good a way as any to meditate.


I've been taking my blood pressure every day for the past few weeks and it hasn't been high again. But my pulse is high. Today I took it after eating without getting up. So I had been sitting still for at least 20 minutes. This is usually a sign of poor fitness level? That it's high while resting or doesn't return to a low pulse quickly after activity ceases?

What annoys me is that I talked my older brother into checking his since it's the 'silent killer' and he had just been running upstairs and out to the car with his luggage when he did it and his BP was something like 109/60 something. And a pulse of 67! Like an pretty serious athlete. And he doesn't eat well, drinks several sodas a day and has been eating Subway sandwiches everyday lately. He works nights, drinks alcohol quite a lot. On the other hand, he doesn't have a sedentary job. And is and always has been all lean muscle even though his only exercise is physical labor (and not all that physical), chores, hobbies like woodworking and auto repair and walking.

Edit: It's occurred to me that I was taking my BP after breakfast, so perhaps I was eating something I was intolerant to.

Edited by alternativista, 27 September 2011 - 11:06 AM.


#17 alternativista

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 11:12 AM

Emotional Freedom Technique aka EFT

An acupressure technique involving tapping in certain places in a certain order:

simple tapping with the fingertips is used to input kinetic energy onto specific meridians on the head and chest while you think about your specific problem - whether it is a traumatic event, an addiction, pain, etc. -- and voice positive affirmations.

This combination of tapping the energy meridians and voicing positive affirmation works to clear the "short-circuit" - the emotional block -- from your body's bioenergy system, thus restoring your mind and body's balance, which is essential for optimal health and the healing of physical disease.


An explanation and demonstration of proper technique by Dr. Mercola: http://eft.mercola.com/

#18 mm97

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 05:03 PM

This is so interesting to me. I have panic disorder, and the more panic attacks I have, the more breakouts I have. It would be so amazing if I could do something that would help with both of those things, because they are the two biggest problems in my life... I have heard great things about biofeedback for anxiety disorders, but I was under the impression that that was typically done with a psychiatrist who monitors you using a computer? Or maybe it doesn't have to be, I don't know.

The trouble with these treatments is that you really have to be committed to it and you have to make sure you're doing it right. It would probably work better for someone who is not trying to control anxiety, since anxiety tends to take control of the brain so you're not really operating at your full capacity... for other, physical-based illnesses, it would probably work very well.

Jon Kabat-Zinn is the narrator's name.


Jon Kabat-Zinn is amazing.

Edited by mm97, 30 September 2011 - 05:05 PM.


#19 alternativista

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 08:11 PM

Do you make sure you get the nutrients that help with anxiety, mood and stress? Do you sleep well? Get outside into the light daily?

#20 alternativista

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:19 PM

Deep breaths inhaling through the nose increase nitric oxide in the blood. This relaxes blood vessels, lowering blood pressure. Humming is even better:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/14636292

Humming is supposed to be good for the sinuses and I have been trying unsuccessfully for years to develop the habit. I do hum happy birthday twice when washing my hands since that's how long you are supposed to wash.

Edited by alternativista, 12 March 2012 - 02:25 PM.