Jump to content

Photo

'recent' Advances In Acne Pathogenesis Information

oily skin

52 replies to this topic

#21 bobbi364

bobbi364

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 755
    Likes: 82
About Me
  • Joined: 15-January 12

Posted 17 April 2012 - 02:20 PM

Not sure if you stated this already, but do you think GMOs have anything to do with this? I have heard GMOs doing terrible stuff, but not sure if it could mess with genetics.

#22 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 17 April 2012 - 03:58 PM

^No, not so far. But I have read that it's usually lectins that they are switching around when modifying something. And lectins are a big culprit in intestinal damage, allergy, and some may inhibit enzymes involved in normal cell desquammation.

---------------------
A paper some people might be interested in:

The Role of Innate Immunity in the Pathogenesis of Acne
http://www.cunliffe-...eck-pivarci.pdf

 

The pdf is formatted to impede copying and pasting.


Edited by alternativista, 08 August 2014 - 02:21 PM.


#23 Tunnelvisionary

Tunnelvisionary

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 394
    Gallery Images: 6
    Likes: 186
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:AIN'T NOTHIN GONNA BREAK MY STRIDE. AIN'T NOTHIN GONNA SLOW ME DOWN.
  • Joined: 18-October 11

Posted 17 April 2012 - 05:40 PM

On the subject of progesterone, vitamin E apparently has anti-estrogenic properties and essentially boosts progesterone. I wanted to get some vitamin E oil today since it's hard to get adequate amounts from food, but a lot of them had things like soybean oil and wheat germ oil in them. Do you know if those can cause reactions if applied topically, alternativista?

#24 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 23 April 2012 - 10:00 AM

Complete journal article on a study that shows that inflammatory events initiate acne formation processes.
'
Inflammatory Events Are Involved in Acne Lesion Initiation'


http://www.nature.co...l/5601829a.html

#25 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 07 May 2012 - 03:47 PM

Clinical implications of lipid peroxidation in acne vulgaris: old wine in new bottles.

Bowe WP, Logan AC.



Source

Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York 11203, USA. wpbowe@gmail.com



Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disorder, one that is frequently associated with depression, anxiety and other psychological sequelae. In recent years there has been an increasing focus on the extent to which oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Emerging studies have shown that patients with acne are under increased cutaneous and systemic oxidative stress. Indeed, there are indications that lipid peroxidation itself is a match that lights an inflammatory cascade in acne. The notion that lipid peroxidation is a 'starter gun' in acne is not a new one; here we review the nearly 50-year-old lipid peroxidation theory and provide a historical perspective to the contemporary investigations and clinical implications.In addition, we present a novel hypothesis in which lipid peroxidation may be priming an increased susceptibility to co-morbid depression and anxiety in those with acne. The emerging research on the systemic burden of oxidative stress in acne sheds further light on the brain-skin axis. The recent findings also suggest potential avenues of approach for the treatment of acne via specific nutrients, dietary modifications, oral and topical interventions.


Interesting article that sites a lot of theories and research that are 50 years old. Such as that oxidative breakdown of squalene and other skin lipids may not merely be a consequence of the acne process, but be directly 'acnegenic to the skin'. and sites research that found success with the topical use of antioxidants E, A and C to support normal keratinization. Full article available: http://www.ncbi.nlm....32/?tool=pubmed which includes the following:

It has been discovered that subclinical inflammatory events are occurring in acne-prone skin even prior to hyperproliferative and abnormal differentiation events [11,12]. The reason for elevated pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), around the clinically normal pilosebaceous follicles of acne patients remains unknown. At this point it simply highlights that the release of inflammatory chemicals is indeed one of the earliest events to occur in the acne process. Furthermore, oxidative stress within the pilosebaceous unit alters the environment from one that is unsuitable to harbor anaerobic bacteria to one that is perfectly suited for the colonization of such species [13]. P. acnes, once thought to be the initiating factor of inflammatory acne, might never make the pilosebaceous unit its home were it not for this initial inflammatory insult to the sebum. Oxidation of sebum alters oxygen tension in the follicle, resulting in the micro-aerophilic environment required for P. acnes to survive. Apparently, inflammation and oxidative stress might set the stage for all subsequent pathogenic factors leading to acne.

Note that linoleic acid, something that acne and other skin problem-prone people are deficient in, inhibits IL-1 amongst it's other anti-inflammatory qualities.


Zinc and IGF-1-

Zinc modulates the IGF-1 system.



Propionibacterium acnes activates the IGF-1/IGF-1R system in the epidermis and induces keratinocyte proliferation.

Isard O, Knol AC, Ariès MF, Nguyen JM, Khammari A, Castex-Rizzi N, Dréno B.



Source

INSERM U892, 9 Quai Moncousu, Nantes, France.



Abstract

Propionibacterium acnes has a major role in the development of acne lesions. IGF-1 stimulates the proliferation of keratinocytes via an activation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Zinc has been proven to work efficiently against inflammatory acne and to modulate the IGF-1 system. Our objectives were to study the modulation of IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression by P. acnes extracts and to determine their modulation by zinc gluconate. In vivo, we analyzed biopsies of acne lesions and healthy skin, and in vitro we used skin explants incubated with two P. acnes extracts--membrane fraction (MF) and cytosolic proteins--with or without zinc. IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, and the IGF-1 production in supernatants was measured by ELISA. Then, IGF-1 and IGF-1R mRNA levels were analyzed using quantitative PCR on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). IGF-1 and IGF-1R were overexpressed in acne lesions. MF increased IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression in the epidermis of explants and was associated with an overexpression of both Ki-67 and filaggrin. Zinc had the effect of downregulating IGF-1 and IGF-1R levels. These observations were confirmed at the mRNA level for IGF-1R in NHEKs. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can induce the formation of comedones by stimulating the IGF/IGF-1R system. Moreover, zinc downregulates this pathway.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20927124

Edited by alternativista, 11 June 2012 - 10:16 AM.


#26 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:24 PM

Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future?
Whitney P BowePosted Image1 and Alan C LoganPosted Image2[color=#3E3E3E !important]
1Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, 11203, USA[/color][color=#3E3E3E !important]
2Integrative Care Centre of Toronto, 3600 Ellesmere Road, Unit 4, Toronto, ON M1C 4Y8, Canada[/color][color=#3E3E3E !important]
Posted ImageCorresponding author.[/color][color=#3E3E3E !important]
Whitney P Bowe: wpbowe@gmail.com; Alan C Logan: aclnd@cfs-fm.org[/color]
[color=#212121]Received December 27, 2010; Accepted January 31, 2011.[/color]
[color=#212121]Over 70 years have passed since dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury first proposed a gastrointestinal mechanism for the overlap between depression, anxiety and skin conditions such as acne. Stokes and Pillsbury hypothesized that emotional states might alter the normal intestinal microflora, increase intestinal permeability and contribute to systemic inflammation. Among the remedies advocated by Stokes and Pillsbury were [/color]Lactobacillus acidophilus [color=#212121]cultures. Many aspects of this gut-brain-skin unifying theory have recently been validated. The ability of the gut microbiota and oral probiotics to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycemic control, tissue lipid content and even mood itself, may have important implications in acne. The intestinal microflora may also provide a twist to the developing diet and acne research. Here we provide a historical perspective to the contemporary investigations and clinical implications of the gut-brain-skin connection in acne.[/color]

http://www.ncbi.nlm....63/?tool=pubmed

Also includes some interesting info on topical probiotics including stuff dating back to 1912. And specifically, topical application boosts ceramide production, the thing we are lacking because of our deficiency in linoleic acid, an important component

'Streptococcus thermophilus[color=#212121], a species found in most yogurts, can increase ceramide production when applied to the skin for 7 days as a cream [[/color]58[color=#212121]]. This work, which has since been replicated [[/color]59[color=#212121],[/color]60[color=#212121]], is of relevance to acne, particularly when considering that some of the ceramide sphingolipids, most notably phytosphingosine (PS), provide both antimicrobial activity against[/color]Propionibacterium acnes [color=#212121]([/color]P. acnes[color=#212121]) and direct anti-inflammatory activity [[/color]61[color=#212121]]. Sphingolipids have been noted to be low in acne [[/color]62[color=#212121]], and the seasonal loss of ceramides may be a driving force behind much higher dermatological office visits for acne during winter months [[/color]63[color=#212121]]. Indeed, topical application of 0.2% PS reduced papules and pustules by 89% in a recent 2-month pilot study [[/color]61[color=#212121]]. [/color]


And this little tidbit on the IGF1 in dairy being reduced in fermented dairy:

[color=#212121]We also find it noteworthy that of three large population studies linking dairy consumption (most notably milk) and acne, none made a positive correlation between fermented dairy (e.g. yogurt) and acne [[/color]103[color=#212121]-[/color]105[color=#212121]]. It has been postulated that milk is associated with acne because it contains growth hormones (both synthetically added and naturally occurring) [[/color]106[color=#212121]]. Acne is certainly driven by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) [[/color]107[color=#212121]], and IGF-I can be absorbed across colonic tissue [[/color]108[color=#212121]]. Therefore, it is interesting to note that probiotic bacteria ([/color]Lactobacilli [color=#212121]in particular) utilize IGF-I during the fermentation process when added to milk, with a resultant 4-fold lower level of IGF-I in fermented vs. skim milk [[/color]109[color=#212121]]. [/color]



Good to know!

Edited by alternativista, 08 May 2012 - 01:05 PM.


#27 Tunnelvisionary

Tunnelvisionary

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 394
    Gallery Images: 6
    Likes: 186
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:AIN'T NOTHIN GONNA BREAK MY STRIDE. AIN'T NOTHIN GONNA SLOW ME DOWN.
  • Joined: 18-October 11

Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:24 AM

Wow, thank you for that Alternativista

#28 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 19 June 2012 - 02:50 PM

So I decided to google desquammation enzymes.

Site elaborating on the desquammation process:

Stratum Corneum Anatomy - The Key to Healthy, Attractive Skin which states that the process is:

very complex and only parts of this process are fully understood. We do know that several enzymes degrade the

corneodesmosomes

in a specific pattern, but we don't know the exact nature of these enzymes or how they become activated to start the exfoliation process. We do know that water and pH play a significant role in the activity of these enzymes.

Another way not stripping away your acid mantle with harsh cleansers may help acne.

And a paper: http://www.google.co...vXhp54BRf6odEYw

The best characterised enzyme so far with a proposed
function in desquamation is stratum corneum chymotryptic
enzyme (SCCE) [6 ± 9].

The mechanisms by which desquamation is regulated remain
to be elucidated. Given the fact that proteolytic degradation
of desmosomes may be a central event in desquamation, a
number of possible regulatory mechanisms can be postulated.
To these belong activation of enzyme precursors, protease
inhibitors in the stratum corneum [14], changes in the lipid
composition of the stratum corneum intercellular space [15],

water content [16, 17] and pH of the stratum corneum [18],
and the action of modifying enzymes such as various
glycosidases [19].

#29 tritonxiv

tritonxiv

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 549
    Likes: 83
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Achievements

     

Posted 19 June 2012 - 03:02 PM

So I decided to google desquammation enzymes.


I have two questions. What is the ideal pH of the skin with regards to washing ones face? (The distilled water I use is slightly acidic)

And about desquammation... From my understanding this is caused by the the breakdown of the intercellular junctions called desmosomes that causes the keratinized squamous cells of the stratum corneum to flake off. What I'm not clear on is how this effects overall skin quality.

#30 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 19 June 2012 - 04:00 PM


So I decided to google desquammation enzymes.


I have two questions. What is the ideal pH of the skin with regards to washing ones face? (The distilled water I use is slightly acidic)

And about desquammation... From my understanding this is caused by the the breakdown of the intercellular junctions called desmosomes that causes the keratinized squamous cells of the stratum corneum to flake off. What I'm not clear on is how this effects overall skin quality.


Your skin should be at about 5.5. Desquammation clears away old dead skin cells revealing a layer of new skin cells. When it happens normally, it leaves fresh, beautiful smooth skin. When it happens unevenly such as in aged or damaged skin, it leaves rough skin. When the cells don't separate and shed freely, they clog pores.

Edited by alternativista, 19 June 2012 - 04:01 PM.


#31 onefatalgoose

onefatalgoose

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 697
    Likes: 180
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 03-May 10

Achievements

     

Posted 19 June 2012 - 04:10 PM

Another way not stripping away your acid mantle with harsh cleansers may help acne.



Amen to that

#32 tritonxiv

tritonxiv

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 549
    Likes: 83
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 02-October 04

Achievements

     

Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:31 PM

Your skin should be at about 5.5. Desquammation clears away old dead skin cells revealing a layer of new skin cells. When it happens normally, it leaves fresh, beautiful smooth skin. When it happens unevenly such as in aged or damaged skin, it leaves rough skin. When the cells don't separate and shed freely, they clog pores.


Good information thank you =]

#33 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:50 PM

Pathogenesis of Acne vulgaris: what's new, what's interesting and what may be clinically relevant
http://findarticles....ag=content;col1


research of cellular, vascular and proliferative markers via immunohistochemical studies displayed inflammatory events preceding hyperkeratinization. (8) In fact, an increase in CD4 T cells and macrophages was found in clinically un-involved pilosebaceous follicles of acne prone skin. (8) Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) was evident perifollicularly. (8) Furthermore, aberrant integrin expression in uninvolved skin and around inflamed lesions lends additional support that inflammatory events may precede hyperproliferation. (8)


the complete genome of P. acnes strain KPA171202 has been elucidated. (14) The mapping of the genome provides evidence for the existence of a gylcocalyx biofilm which is secreted by P. acnesto act as an "adhesive glue" for the corneocytes in the infundibulum resulting in comedonal acne. (15) Understanding the gylcocalyx polymer layer has clinical relevance in acne therapy. Biofilms act as a protective barrier against antimicrobial agents and may explain why antibiotics are prescribed for months to take effect. (14) Therapy aimed at biofilm formation by P. acnes may be a target source for future acne treatments. Secondly, P. acnes lipase is known to elicit inflammation in acne; however, additional degradative enzymes contributing to follicle wall damage have also been identified following gene sequencing. These include endoglycoceramidases, sialidase/neuraminidases, proteinases and 5 CAMP factors which all contribute to tissue degradation. (14), (16-17)
Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown, research supports the finding of P. acnes inducing matrix metalloprotein-ases (MMP) in sebum via toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2).18 MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-13 were identified in acne sebum and thought to originate from keratinocytes and sebocytes. (18) In addition, levels of MMP diminished with clinical improvement of acne lesions following therapy. (18), (19) In fact, treatment of primary human monocytes with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) significantly decreased MMP-9 expression. (19) These results indicate that MMP may contribute as one of the mediators in the inflammatory phase of acne vulgaris.



#34 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:15 PM

I just noticed something here. The same mutated enzyme we acne prone people may have that inhibits retinoid production in our skin may also inhibit vitamin D production. See the earlier post on beta carotene and retinoid production http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/298075-recent-advances-in-acne-pathogenesis-information/?p=3229786    See also my Diet for Clear skin blog post of a recipe for sweet potato and greens soup.  Try it!  http://dietforclearskin.blogspot.com/2013/02/hot-spicy-bowl-of-vitamin-for-your-skin.html

 

So perhaps we need to supplement, even if we try to get it from the sun. Although you should try to get it from the sun as well as some researchers believe we need vitamin D sulfate for some of the functions vitamin D performs. And this has to be made in your body from cholesterol sulfate.   Also, that same bit of sun exposure might trigger the conversion of beta carotene to retinoids. 

 

-------------------

Also, because oxidized lipids in the skin are considered a culprit in acne formation and benzoyl peroxide is an oxidizer, I decided to look up some studies:

 

This one is about topical spearment reducing the harm from BP in mice:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/11039327  "The result suggests that spearmint is an effective chemopreventive agent that may suppress BPO-induced cutaneous oxidative stress, toxicity and hyperproliferative effects in the skin of mice."

 

And this one is about retinoic acids reducing the harm from BP

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15225900


Edited by alternativista, 13 February 2013 - 03:16 PM.


#35 sepsi

sepsi

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 466
    Gallery Images: 6
    Likes: 45
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Finland
  • Interests:health, well being, natural healing, sports, diving, reading, internet
  • Joined: 17-March 06

Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:45 AM

Also, because oxidized lipids in the skin are considered a culprit in acne formation and benzoyl peroxide is an oxidizer, I decided to look up some studies:

 

This one is about topical spearment reducing the harm from BP in mice:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/11039327  "The result suggests that spearmint is an effective chemopreventive agent that may suppress BPO-induced cutaneous oxidative stress, toxicity and hyperproliferative effects in the skin of mice."

 

And this one is about retinoic acids reducing the harm from BP

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15225900

 

 

I think it's a little simplistic to shun away from BP just because its oxidizing effect. Yes, inflammation is very bad for the skin and probably the very thing that triggers the acne formation process.
 
At the same time BP can reduce inflammation in the skin. It destroys the bacteria that escalate inflammation and also the cells that initiate the inflammatory process in the skin. 
 
Not to mention the fact that BP reduces acne and redness of the skin. Though, when used improperly, it can also damage the skin.
 
Also, if you want to reduce inflammation, why bother with spearmint oil or other herbal stuff? Straight vitamins B3, C and E are likely to be much more effective - not to mention easier to find in products.


#36 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:06 AM




Also, because oxidized lipids in the skin are considered a culprit in acne formation and benzoyl peroxide is an oxidizer, I decided to look up some studies:
 
This one is about topical spearmint reducing the harm from BP in mice:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/11039327  "The result suggests that spearmint is an effective chemopreventive agent that may suppress BPO-induced cutaneous oxidative stress, toxicity and hyperproliferative effects in the skin of mice."
 
And this one is about retinoic acids reducing the harm from BP
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15225900

 
 
I think it's a little simplistic to shun away from BP just because its oxidizing effect. Yes, inflammation is very bad for the skin and probably the very thing that triggers the acne formation process.
 
At the same time BP can reduce inflammation in the skin. It destroys the bacteria that escalate inflammation and also the cells that initiate the inflammatory process in the skin. 
 
Not to mention the fact that BP reduces acne and redness of the skin. Though, when used improperly, it can also damage the skin.
 
Also, if you want to reduce inflammation, why bother with spearmint oil or other herbal stuff? Straight vitamins B3, C and E are likely to be much more effective - not to mention easier to find in products.

Many things are anti inflammatory. So why apply something that causes harm?

BP never reduced my acne. And it increases redness and irritation. The forum is filled with people that say the same.

I dont know why the researchers chose to use spearmint oil on the mice.


Edited by alternativista, 19 February 2013 - 03:07 PM.


#37 onefatalgoose

onefatalgoose

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 697
    Likes: 180
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Joined: 03-May 10

Achievements

     

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:34 AM

 




Also, because oxidized lipids in the skin are considered a culprit in acne formation and benzoyl peroxide is an oxidizer, I decided to look up some studies:
 
This one is about topical spearment reducing the harm from BP in mice:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/11039327  "The result suggests that spearmint is an effective chemopreventive agent that may suppress BPO-induced cutaneous oxidative stress, toxicity and hyperproliferative effects in the skin of mice."
 
And this one is about retinoic acids reducing the harm from BP
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15225900

 
 
I think it's a little simplistic to shun away from BP just because its oxidizing effect. Yes, inflammation is very bad for the skin and probably the very thing that triggers the acne formation process.
 
At the same time BP can reduce inflammation in the skin. It destroys the bacteria that escalate inflammation and also the cells that initiate the inflammatory process in the skin. 
 
Not to mention the fact that BP reduces acne and redness of the skin. Though, when used improperly, it can also damage the skin.
 
Also, if you want to reduce inflammation, why bother with spearmint oil or other herbal stuff? Straight vitamins B3, C and E are likely to be much more effective - not to mention easier to find in products.

Many things are anti inflammatory. So why apply something that causes harm?

BP never reduced my acne. And it increases redness and irritation. The forum is filled with people that say the same.

 

Yes, this.  Anything that causes an oxidative effect similar to a sunburn is not ok in my book.  Not to mention tumor inducing in mice.  If BP, alone, has genuinely reduced a person's redness, that person has iron skin, and is a rarity amongst human beings.  


Edited by onefatalgoose, 19 February 2013 - 11:35 AM.


#38 sepsi

sepsi

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 466
    Gallery Images: 6
    Likes: 45
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Finland
  • Interests:health, well being, natural healing, sports, diving, reading, internet
  • Joined: 17-March 06

Posted 20 February 2013 - 01:58 AM

Many things are anti inflammatory. So why apply something that causes harm?

BP never reduced my acne. And it increases redness and irritation. The forum is filled with people that say the same.

 

There's little evidence that BP, when used properly, causes any harm. And just like every other medicine out there, BP has both positive and negative effects. The art of medicine comes in choosing medicines that do more good than harm.

 

If BP reduced your acne, then you are among the minority. The other sections of this forum are filled with people who say that BP indeed has reduced their acne and skin redness. Not to mention tens and tens of clinical studies that show efficacy from BP.

 

Why use BP? Because at the moment it's one of the best anti-acne topicals. No 'natural ingredient' has similar demonstrated efficacy. Some antioxidants, like niacin and vitamin C derivates, show promise and might even turn out to be more effective than BP. That's for the future science to show. But it doesn't take away the fact that BP does work.



#39 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,526
    Likes: 1,102
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:24 AM


Many things are anti inflammatory. So why apply something that causes harm?

BP never reduced my acne. And it increases redness and irritation. The forum is filled with people that say the same.

 
There's little evidence that BP, when used properly, causes any harm. And just like every other medicine out there, BP has both positive and negative effects. The art of medicine comes in choosing medicines that do more good than harm.
 
If BP reduced your acne, then you are among the minority. The other sections of this forum are filled with people who say that BP indeed has reduced their acne and skin redness. Not to mention tens and tens of clinical studies that show efficacy from BP.
 
Why use BP? Because at the moment it's one of the best anti-acne topicals. No 'natural ingredient' has similar demonstrated efficacy. Some antioxidants, like niacin and vitamin C derivates, show promise and might even turn out to be more effective than BP. That's for the future science to show. But it doesn't take away the fact that BP does work.

And this forum is filled with people for whom it didn't work. And with people who chose not to use medicines that cause harm.

#40 sepsi

sepsi

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 466
    Gallery Images: 6
    Likes: 45
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Finland
  • Interests:health, well being, natural healing, sports, diving, reading, internet
  • Joined: 17-March 06

Posted 20 February 2013 - 09:43 PM

And this forum is filled with people for whom it didn't work. And with people who chose not to use medicines that cause harm.

 

This forum is also filled with people who haven't made much progress with their acne in years. So not much of an argument.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users