IndigoRush

Repairing the long-term damage from Accutane

11,725 posts in this topic

35 minutes ago, Justdry said:

To be honest mate, i'd gladly take my cysts and oily skin back in return for this dried up mess i've been left with post accutane. Without living with the permanent side effects you can't really make a statement like that. 

I've been left with permanent extreme dry skin and i struggle with the day to day. Most people in this thread have been left with much much worse effects so i can only imagine how bad it is for them. 

I'd give anything to go back in time and just live with my cystic acne. 
I feel for you mate. You are right I don't live with permanent side effects but I did live with the side effects and are very familiar with extremely dry skin thus becoming really red and it looks like you are blushing the whole time. Really embarrassing I know. I'm also very familiar with using bottles of moisturisers just to keep your face from not drying out.  Saw your picture in the your "post accutane effect" and that looks really annoying. Haven't seen anything like that before. Still looks better than having severe cystic acne in my opinion. What does were you on while you took accutane and for how long?

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I really cant remeber to be honest with you. It was 6 or 7 years ago. Im sure i started on 40mg then went to 80mg after a couple of months for a 6 month total. I THINK !! I need to request my medical records. 

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I think part of the problem is dermatologist need to use extreme discretion when prescribing accutane. It's for extreme disfiguring or scarring acne only as a last resort. Not for mild, moderate or persistent acne that alot of us probably would have just grown out of. Alot of dermatologist or the medical field in general aren't aware or deny the chronic side effects that happen after treatment. 

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Yea I had mild resistant acne
and it was on cheeks

sad part is
i use to go into stores malls parties and more
with it

now I barely leave house

alao I ran into someone from high school 
and mentioned how I got sick from this acne chemo med
and girl said u didn't even have acne 

:(

if u have cystic acne yes this drug is good 
but other than that I wouldn't go near it 

Guess only good thing that came from this med
was it made me housebound at 19 keeping me away from heroin and drugs that all my friends did it also kept me from Pepsi and McDonald's and shit food

oyher than that it did nothing

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3 hours ago, Justdry said:

I really cant remeber to be honest with you. It was 6 or 7 years ago. Im sure i started on 40mg then went to 80mg after a couple of months for a 6 month total. I THINK !! I need to request my medical records. 

Ok I was on 25 or 30mg can't remember and for only 3 months. It god rid of my acne forever. But then again it depends what size you are male/female etc.

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4 hours ago, guitarman01 said:

I think part of the problem is dermatologist need to use extreme discretion when prescribing accutane. It's for extreme disfiguring or scarring acne only as a last resort. Not for mild, moderate or persistent acne that alot of us probably would have just grown out of. Alot of dermatologist or the medical field in general aren't aware or deny the chronic side effects that happen after treatment. 

I had a few pimples on my face and some acne on my back due to waxing and bad skin treatment afterwards so my derm told me to do a course of accutane and that it was no biggie. I regret to this day not researching more on the net about this drug since it obvisouly wasn't the cure I was looking for. I have permanent dry skin/flushing and still lose tons of dry and brittle hair from dry scalp 2 years later. Wish I found this thread and website back in 2014.

Tbh I think most derms just dont bother reading about long terms effect of accutane, they just read some basic information on the drug and prescribe it when asked for it even if the patient's acne isnt severe. Edited by musha

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@musha sorry to hear 
I did have hair falling out in 2012
but thyroid med maybe helped that at time no clue
my eyebrows lashes come out easily now
 my skins still flaky and red and flushes 9 years later 
so no clue what to say
most people on here seem to know more
jist know u aren't alone and I'm sorry

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To the Editor, Drug-induced esophageal injury is a common cause of esophageal diseases. Many drugs have beenreported to cause esophagitis and esophageal ulcers; among these are antibiotics such as doxycycline and tetracycline, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, and potassium chloride (1). Isotretioin is a synthetic analogue of vitamin A and is widely used in the management of acne vulgaris. However, several adverse effects of this drug have been reported, including mucositis and chelitis (2). Among these, a possible association of inflammatory bowel disease with isotretioin deserves further attention (3). Although the exact mechanism is not clear, the possible role of isotretinoin in the inhibition of epithelial cell growth, induction of apoptosis, lymphocyte migration, and immunomodulation have been proposed. We report a patient with multiple esophageal ulcers in which the only possible cause was the oral ingestion of isotretioin. A 29-year-old woman who had no previous gastrointestinal complaints (including no reflux symptoms) and no serious medical or surgical history presented to our gastroenterology department with severe odynophagia. She had started to use isotretioin for acne vulgaris one month before and had not used any other medication recently. Her odynophagia began suddenly two days before presentation and was similar in intensity while swallowing solids and liquids. Her physical examination, routine laboratory tests, chest x-ray and upper abdominal ultrasonography were all within normal limits. An emergency endoscopy was performed and showed discrete esophageal ulcers (3-8 mm in size) starting 30 cm from the incisors and disappearing gradually towards the 38 th cm (Figure 1). At the gastroesophageal junction (40 cm), no signs of reflux esophagitis were seen. Histopathology of biopsy samples from the ulcers revealed evidence of ulcerative esophagitis, i.e. small obliterated vessels in the ulcerated area, reminiscent of vasculitis (Figure 2). No fungus was identified with PAS stain. Isotretinoin was stopped; paracetamol and sucralfate liquid (6 times daily once before and after each meal) were started. Investigations for other vasculitic or rheumatologic conditions (serum CRP, ANA, C-ANCA, P-ANCA and ACE) were all within normal values. In a few days, the patient's pain waned and finally disappeared after one week following the cessation of isotretinoin. Isotretioin was the probable etiologic agent of esophageal ulcers in this patient. Pill-induced esophagitis may occur due to several mechanisms (direct injury by caustic coatings, dissolution after prolonged contact and direct injury to the esophagus by the drug, etc.); the ulcer-causing mechanism of isotretinoin may be similar to that involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.
Edited by guitarman01

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Read through a decent amount of this topic, sorry to hear most of ye are going through hell. Going through similar stuff myself. Didn't take accutane, it was tetralysal that caused me so much pain. food intolerances to almost every kind of food, used to have IBS-C (cleared that with probiotics) and it worsened my acne!!!
It also yellowed my teeth a bit.

Currently working on getting my gut healthy again, also thinking I have some sort of histamine intolerance.

Sucks when everyone you know when you were growing up seemed to take pills and their acne cleared, no issues with side-effects. Now they probably forget they had acne. Im still struggling on aged 22 fml

Edited by ZitsSuck21

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So there is a possibility of this. It can happen as late as 5 years after initiation of drug. It can be progressive. It could maybe effect systems such as the skin and gut that aren't going to show up on blood test. its similar to an allergic reaction. Could be highly individualised depending on the person. Most effective treatment seems to consist of steroids.

And this is more so for the people that seem to suffer multi-progressive symptoms over years and years that dont improve. Not just the dry skin post tane.



Drug-induced eosinophilia

This review looks at drugs that produce eosinophilia and explains how this condition may be managed

 

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell formed in the bone marrow from stem cells. They are granulocytes derived from the same progenitor cells as monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and basophils. The usual blood eosinophil count is 350 per mm3 with diurnal variation; the peak occurs at night and the trough in the morning. The circulating half-life of most eosinophils is six to 12 hours with most eosinophils residing in tissues (eg, the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tract).1

 
 

There are a number of hypotheses regarding the function of eosinophils. It has been suggested they modulate the intensity of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG-mediated reactions, for example, in schistosomiasis.2 They are toxic to helminths in vitro and it is also possible that eosinophils protect against certain tissue invasive metazoan parasites such as Pneumocystis carinii.1,3Finally, they may act via hormones such as adrenaline, oestrogens or glucocorticoids.3

Eosinophilia is defined as a peripheral blood eosinophil count greater than 350 per mm3.1 (Hypereosinophilia is defined as a peripheral blood count greater than 1,500 per mm3.) It is a common allergic manifestation of many drugs and usually disappears when the drug is stopped. Unless very severe, the severity of eosinophilia is solely related to the allergic responses that accompany it. The parts of the body that tend to be affected are the heart, lungs, skin, joints, gut and central nervous system. Prolonged periods of eosinophilia may result in tissue damage although the exact mechanism by which this occurs is still unclear.1

There are a number of causes of eosinophilia, allergic and atopic diseases being among the most common.1 Infections, particularly parasitic infestation, may produce an eosinophilia, as may fungal infections. Generally, however, bacterial or viral infections are associated with eosinopenia.4 Neoplastic disease, for example Hodgkin’s disease, may occasionally cause an elevated eosinophil count.3 Connective tissue disorders and skin disorders, such as pemphigus, are often associated with eosinophilia.1

The eosinophilic pneumonias are a group of diseases of both known and unknown aetiology, characterised by eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia is known as L?ffler’s syndrome and may be associated with a low grade fever, minimal respiratory symptoms and prompt recovery.1

Relating eosinophilia to a particular drug can be difficult. Hypersensitivity reactions to substances such as nickel, ragweed, pollen, poison ivy extracts, helminthic infestations, brucellosis, amoebiasis and coccidioidomycosis have all been associated with eosinophilia.5 To confirm a drug reaction, these chemical and infectious causes must be excluded. Diagnosis is further complicated because the drug may worsen a pre-existing eosinophilia, particularly in an atopic patient.6 Given that allergic reactions may result in eosinophilia, it would appear to be a potential problem with many drugs, as dictated by the idiosyncratic response of the individual patient.


 

Management

If the eosinophilia is mild, transient and asymptomatic, there is no need to take action. If, however, the eosinophilia is more severe and producing symptoms, the most important management step is to discontinue any agent that may have caused the reaction.

Eosinophilia usually occurs within eight weeks of any medicine being started, so agents started in this period should be discontinued initially. Symptoms have been reported to develop up to five years after initiation of a medicine.9Patients usually recover after the offending drug is withdrawn. It is also important to treat any renal, hepatic, pulmonary, CNS or any other complications of the eosinophilia.

Corticosteroids are often used, but there are no placebo controlled trials assessing their effectiveness and their role is not clear. Some sources suggest they have little benefit and no effect on outcomes,56,70 while others suggest that they produce a more rapid response.50,55 It has been suggested that corticosteroids should be reserved for more serious reactions.55Corticosteroids are sometimes not prescribed because of concern about an infection causing the eosinophilia.57

There is also some debate about the dose required. There are reports of doses between 10?100mg prednisone being used.41 Generally, high doses tend to be used; for example, daily doses of 60?90mg of prednisone or prednisolone have been used to treat NSAID-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.55,75 There are reports of 30?40mg daily of prednisone being used to treat the mainly pulmonary symptoms of minocycline- or tetracycline-induced eosinophilia.23,76 In one case, there were persistent dermal complications which required more prolonged treatment with prednisone.23

Additionally, there is no clear consensus on the duration of corticosteroid therapy. Most patients receive two to six weeks’ treatment, although much longer courses have also been recommended and used. It has been reported that stopping steroid therapy, particularly in patients with chronic eosinophilia, may result in relapse.77 These patients sometimes require long-term corticosteroids.9

Edited by guitarman01

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1 hour ago, macleod said:

This thread gets derailed more than a train in tajfuckistan.


Man I hear you but you've gotta sympathise when we don't know what the fuck has exactly happened to us after tane, people will happily chuck up anything that might be the cause. There's no doctors or scientists that I know of looking at our problems bar one or two worldwide.

The post above about eosinophilia- I read that and go, well that could be what I have and really why shouldn't I count it in as a possibility?

No supplement is doing the job, I can try wishing my way out of it, but that doesn't work either.

If steroids are the answer, bring it on I say. Edited by TrueJustice
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22 hours ago, Justdry said:

To be honest mate, i'd gladly take my cysts and oily skin back in return for this dried up mess i've been left with post accutane. Without living with the permanent side effects you can't really make a statement like that. 

I've been left with permanent extreme dry skin and i struggle with the day to day. Most people in this thread have been left with much much worse effects so i can only imagine how bad it is for them. 

I'd give anything to go back in time and just live with my cystic acne. 

signed

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18 hours ago, guitarman01 said:

So there is a possibility of this. It can happen as late as 5 years after initiation of drug. It can be progressive. It could maybe effect systems such as the skin and gut that aren't going to show up on blood test. its similar to an allergic reaction. Could be highly individualised depending on the person. Most effective treatment seems to consist of steroids.

And this is more so for the people that seem to suffer multi-progressive symptoms over years and years that dont improve. Not just the dry skin post tane.



Drug-induced eosinophilia

This review looks at drugs that produce eosinophilia and explains how this condition may be managed

 

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell formed in the bone marrow from stem cells. They are granulocytes derived from the same progenitor cells as monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and basophils. The usual blood eosinophil count is 350 per mm3 with diurnal variation; the peak occurs at night and the trough in the morning. The circulating half-life of most eosinophils is six to 12 hours with most eosinophils residing in tissues (eg, the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tract).1

 
 

There are a number of hypotheses regarding the function of eosinophils. It has been suggested they modulate the intensity of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG-mediated reactions, for example, in schistosomiasis.2 They are toxic to helminths in vitro and it is also possible that eosinophils protect against certain tissue invasive metazoan parasites such as Pneumocystis carinii.1,3Finally, they may act via hormones such as adrenaline, oestrogens or glucocorticoids.3

Eosinophilia is defined as a peripheral blood eosinophil count greater than 350 per mm3.1 (Hypereosinophilia is defined as a peripheral blood count greater than 1,500 per mm3.) It is a common allergic manifestation of many drugs and usually disappears when the drug is stopped. Unless very severe, the severity of eosinophilia is solely related to the allergic responses that accompany it. The parts of the body that tend to be affected are the heart, lungs, skin, joints, gut and central nervous system. Prolonged periods of eosinophilia may result in tissue damage although the exact mechanism by which this occurs is still unclear.1

There are a number of causes of eosinophilia, allergic and atopic diseases being among the most common.1 Infections, particularly parasitic infestation, may produce an eosinophilia, as may fungal infections. Generally, however, bacterial or viral infections are associated with eosinopenia.4 Neoplastic disease, for example Hodgkin’s disease, may occasionally cause an elevated eosinophil count.3 Connective tissue disorders and skin disorders, such as pemphigus, are often associated with eosinophilia.1

The eosinophilic pneumonias are a group of diseases of both known and unknown aetiology, characterised by eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia is known as L?ffler’s syndrome and may be associated with a low grade fever, minimal respiratory symptoms and prompt recovery.1

Relating eosinophilia to a particular drug can be difficult. Hypersensitivity reactions to substances such as nickel, ragweed, pollen, poison ivy extracts, helminthic infestations, brucellosis, amoebiasis and coccidioidomycosis have all been associated with eosinophilia.5 To confirm a drug reaction, these chemical and infectious causes must be excluded. Diagnosis is further complicated because the drug may worsen a pre-existing eosinophilia, particularly in an atopic patient.6 Given that allergic reactions may result in eosinophilia, it would appear to be a potential problem with many drugs, as dictated by the idiosyncratic response of the individual patient.


 

Management

If the eosinophilia is mild, transient and asymptomatic, there is no need to take action. If, however, the eosinophilia is more severe and producing symptoms, the most important management step is to discontinue any agent that may have caused the reaction.

Eosinophilia usually occurs within eight weeks of any medicine being started, so agents started in this period should be discontinued initially. Symptoms have been reported to develop up to five years after initiation of a medicine.9Patients usually recover after the offending drug is withdrawn. It is also important to treat any renal, hepatic, pulmonary, CNS or any other complications of the eosinophilia.

Corticosteroids are often used, but there are no placebo controlled trials assessing their effectiveness and their role is not clear. Some sources suggest they have little benefit and no effect on outcomes,56,70 while others suggest that they produce a more rapid response.50,55 It has been suggested that corticosteroids should be reserved for more serious reactions.55Corticosteroids are sometimes not prescribed because of concern about an infection causing the eosinophilia.57

There is also some debate about the dose required. There are reports of doses between 10?100mg prednisone being used.41 Generally, high doses tend to be used; for example, daily doses of 60?90mg of prednisone or prednisolone have been used to treat NSAID-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.55,75 There are reports of 30?40mg daily of prednisone being used to treat the mainly pulmonary symptoms of minocycline- or tetracycline-induced eosinophilia.23,76 In one case, there were persistent dermal complications which required more prolonged treatment with prednisone.23

Additionally, there is no clear consensus on the duration of corticosteroid therapy. Most patients receive two to six weeks’ treatment, although much longer courses have also been recommended and used. It has been reported that stopping steroid therapy, particularly in patients with chronic eosinophilia, may result in relapse.77 These patients sometimes require long-term corticosteroids.9

This is super duper interesting and given my previous success with corticosteroids I would totally love to try this but I'm scared of more potential joint damage while taking it. Also I could basically say good bye to all my muscle gains.

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3 hours ago, ehohel said:

This is super duper interesting and given my previous success with corticosteroids I would totally love to try this but I'm scared of more potential joint damage while taking it. Also I could basically say good bye to all my muscle gains.

I was actually given 5mg low dose prednisone by a rheumatologist to treat joint and muscle pain. They use a low dose like this to treat rheumatoid arthritis. What kind of dose were you taking? I myself wouldnt take anything higher then 5mg without having a idea of what was going on. I'm getting a endoscopy on Monday and they will biopsy my tissue to see if I still have a elevated esophil count in my esophagus. If so, they will give me a oral flonase to swallow, the dose is around 800mcg prob along with a ppi of at least 40mg and maybe something to coat the esophagus. I have never tried the swallowed flonase before.
    If this was drug induced by Accutane I wonder if anyone else might have something similar going on. This could be a source of chronic inflammation.  This could trigger chronic reflux that people might not be aware of. This could after awhile(especially when you sleep)start effecting your sinuses and eustachian tubes that could trigger the facial flushing ,ear fullness, Pressure feeling in head. Because your ears have closed up from the aspirations of the reflux. So you have a constant feeling of head fullness. This could irritate the eyes as well. Anyone feel the worst when they first wake up in the morning? would you describe your depression almost as a pain or headache?
    Here is a study i was talking about in regards to referred pain. if there was some kind of abnormal inflammation going on along the spine due to accutane, this could after time trigger nerve pain anywhere in the body which could maybe induce lack of blood flow which leads to muscle spasms, contractions,weakness because the muscles are constantly contracted. Anyways big could for some of this stuff but its possible. 
If my head just felt clear id be good, and this could be a reason why. again i stress could.

Scientists tap into spinal response from gastric reflux

Manash Pratim Gohain| TNN | Oct 1, 2013, 07.48 AM IST
 
 
 
NEW DELHI: University of Adelaide researchers have made advances in the understanding of one of the world's most common medical conditions, gastric reflux, and how patients experience pain from it. Gastric reflux affects as many as one in five people in Western countries and is on the increase in Asia. Diet and lifestyle, as well as genetic and hormonal issues, are commonly considered to be major causes of gastric reflux.
 

In laboratory studies, researchers have identified the nerve pathways in the spinal cord that transmit pain signals associated with gastric reflux to the brain. "This is the first time anyone has shown the pain pathways in the spinal cord that receive direct input from acid-sensitive nerve endings in the oesophagus," says Dr Andrea Harrington, an Australian Research Council (ARC) DECRA research fellow in the University's Nerve-Gut Laboratory.
 
 
 

"This is important because we know that the oesophageal nerves undergo changes in gastric reflux patients that make them overly sensitive to acid. There is also evidence to suggest that the whole circuitry becomes abnormally sensitive in these patients, resulting in ongoing pain responses in the absence of actual acid reflux. Our research will enable us to identify such mechanisms," she says.
 
 
 

Dr Harrington says it's important to better understand how we detect and perceive pain from gastric reflux. "Being able to know exactly how pain pathways connect to the brain will give us new insights, which in the years ahead could lead to improved treatment," she says. Dr Harrington says most current treatments focus on reducing the amount of acid in the stomach. "However, we think it's a much more complex issue than that. There might come a time when treatments are able to both address the amount of acid in the stomach while correcting the sensitivity of nerve endings. This would go a long way to providing more balanced relief to suffers of gastric reflux."
 
 
 

The next step in this research is to find out how the pain pathways are changed in reflux sufferers. The results of Dr Harrington's work have been published in the journal Neurogastroenterology and Motility.
Edited by guitarman01

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19 minutes ago, guitarman01 said:
I was actually given 5mg low dose prednisone by a rheumatologist to treat joint and muscle pain. They use a low dose like this to treat rheumatoid arthritis. What kind of dose were you taking? I myself wouldnt take anything higher then 5mg without having a idea of what was going on. I'm getting a endoscopy on Monday and they will biopsy my tissue to see if I still have a elevated esophil count in my esophagus. If so, they will give me a oral flonase to swallow, the dose is around 800mcg prob along with a ppi of at least 40mg and maybe something to coat the esophagus. I have never tried the swallowed flonase before.
    If this was drug induced by Accutane I wonder if anyone else might have something similar going on. This could be a source of chronic inflammation.  This could trigger chronic reflux that people might not be aware of. This could after awhile(especially when you sleep)start effecting your sinuses and eustachian tubes that could trigger the facial flushing ,ear fullness, Pressure feeling in head. Because your ears have closed up from the aspirations of the reflux. So you have a constant feeling of head fullness. This could irritate the eyes as well. Anyone feel the worst when they first wake up in the morning? would you describe your depression almost as a pain or headache?
    Here is a study i was talking about in regards to referred pain. if there was some kind of abnormal inflammation going on along the spine due to accutane, this could after time trigger nerve pain anywhere in the body which could maybe induce lack of blood flow which leads to muscle spasms, contractions,weakness because the muscles are constantly contracted. Anyways big could for some of this stuff but its possible. 
If my head just felt clear id be good, and this could be a reason why. again i stress could.
Prednisone 60mg x5 days, 40mg x5 days, 20mg x5 days. Edited by ehohel

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wow ok that is a pretty high dose. did a doctor prescribe this? and for what reason?

here is fda reports on accutane causing eosinophilic esophagitis. Looks legit but im not a 100 percent sure. but when you look at the timeline and compared to other drugs thats a pretty big number.
 

About this FactMed analysis covering adverse side effect reports of ACCUTANE patients who developed EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.

FactMed provides MD-approved analysis to help both patients, researchers, and physicians accurately assess the risk profile for more than 20,000 different pharmaceutical products. The below report offers compiled information from Food & Drug Administration and FactMed user submissions. Between January 2004 and October 2012, 20 individuals taking ACCUTANE reported EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS to the FDA. A total of 26681 ACCUTANE drug adverse event reaction reports were made with the FDA during this time period. Often the FDA only receives reports of the most critical and severe cases; these numbers may therefore underrepresent the complication rate of the medication. 
 
 
Summary Statistics
Reports of ACCUTANE causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS: 20
Reports of any side effect of ACCUTANE : 26681
Percentage of ACCUTANE patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is a reported side effect: 0.0750%

FDA reports of any drug causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS : 121
Average percentage for all medicated patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is reported as a complication: 0.0008%

http://factmed.com/study-ACCUTANE-causing-EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.php








 

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46 minutes ago, guitarman01 said:

wow ok that is a pretty high dose. did a doctor prescribe this? and for what reason?

here is fda reports on accutane causing eosinophilic esophagitis. Looks legit but im not a 100 percent sure. but when you look at the timeline and compared to other drugs thats a pretty big number.
 

About this FactMed analysis covering adverse side effect reports of ACCUTANE patients who developed EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.

FactMed provides MD-approved analysis to help both patients, researchers, and physicians accurately assess the risk profile for more than 20,000 different pharmaceutical products. The below report offers compiled information from Food & Drug Administration and FactMed user submissions. Between January 2004 and October 2012, 20 individuals taking ACCUTANE reported EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS to the FDA. A total of 26681 ACCUTANE drug adverse event reaction reports were made with the FDA during this time period. Often the FDA only receives reports of the most critical and severe cases; these numbers may therefore underrepresent the complication rate of the medication. 
 
 
Summary Statistics
Reports of ACCUTANE causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS: 20
Reports of any side effect of ACCUTANE : 26681
Percentage of ACCUTANE patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is a reported side effect: 0.0750%

FDA reports of any drug causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS : 121
Average percentage for all medicated patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is reported as a complication: 0.0008%

http://factmed.com/study-ACCUTANE-causing-EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.php








 
I was having some weird breathing coughing issue and he though it was asthma and did a 15 day prednisone taper.

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8 hours ago, guitarman01 said:

wow ok that is a pretty high dose. did a doctor prescribe this? and for what reason?

here is fda reports on accutane causing eosinophilic esophagitis. Looks legit but im not a 100 percent sure. but when you look at the timeline and compared to other drugs thats a pretty big number.
 

About this FactMed analysis covering adverse side effect reports of ACCUTANE patients who developed EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.

FactMed provides MD-approved analysis to help both patients, researchers, and physicians accurately assess the risk profile for more than 20,000 different pharmaceutical products. The below report offers compiled information from Food & Drug Administration and FactMed user submissions. Between January 2004 and October 2012, 20 individuals taking ACCUTANE reported EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS to the FDA. A total of 26681 ACCUTANE drug adverse event reaction reports were made with the FDA during this time period. Often the FDA only receives reports of the most critical and severe cases; these numbers may therefore underrepresent the complication rate of the medication. 
 
 
Summary Statistics
Reports of ACCUTANE causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS: 20
Reports of any side effect of ACCUTANE : 26681
Percentage of ACCUTANE patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is a reported side effect: 0.0750%

FDA reports of any drug causing EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS : 121
Average percentage for all medicated patients where EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS is reported as a complication: 0.0008%

http://factmed.com/study-ACCUTANE-causing-EOSINOPHILIC OESOPHAGITIS.php








 
http://www.anaturalcure.com/iodine-induces-apoptosis-and-inhibits-cells-from-forming-cancer-esophageal-varicose/

Do you think these conditions are related in anyway?

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Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot. Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot. Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot.
https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/category/dr-flechas/

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1 hour ago, hatetane said:

Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot. Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot. Twenty percent of all of the iodine sits in the human skin. A lack of iodine in the skin manifests as very dry skin and skin that does not sweat when an individual becomes hot.
https://pcoslady.wordpress.com/category/dr-flechas/


Im not sure what to say about this, I feel extremely dry yet I sweat like nobody's business after tane. I could sweat just brushing my teeth after tane!!

The body is so fucked after tane it wouldn't know what to do with Iodine anyway.

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48 minutes ago, TrueJustice said:

Im not sure what to say about this, I feel extremely dry yet I sweat like nobody's business after tane. I could sweat just brushing my teeth after tane!!

The body is so fucked after tane it wouldn't know what to do with Iodine anyway.
http://www.anaturalcure.com/iodine-induces-apoptosis-and-inhibits-cells-from-forming-cancer-esophageal-varicose/
There are guidelines here and lots of advice on youtube 
4 minutes ago, hatetane said:
https://www.hakalalabs.com/resources/

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Anyone had the blood test? I do already eat alot of dairy and grains high in iodine according to this

Iodine Blood Test

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An Iodine Blood Test monitors exposure to iodine; evaluate for iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs), excessive iodine intake, or iodine in the workplace.
Test #070034
 
 

Additional Info

Preparation No Fasting Required.
Test Type Blood
Test Results 2-3 days

Details

The Iodine Blood Test is useful in the diagnosis of iodine deficiency or excess, iodine-induced hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) and hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), and autoimmune thyroid diseases such as Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as monitoring exposure to iodine.

Iodine is a mineral listed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the most important micronutrients. Adequate amounts are essential for proper thyroid function and critical during pregnancy for healthy development of the fetus. The body’s primary source of iodine is food; seafood, dairy products and whole grains tend to be good sources of the mineral in the U.S. Iodized salt is also a common source. Recommended daily intake varies by agency, but the WHO, International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, and UNICEF recommend the following amounts:

  • Up to 7 years old: 90 micrograms (mcg)

  • 7-12 years old: 120 mcg

  • 12 years and older: 150 mcg

  • Pregnant/breastfeeding women: 200 mcg

Throughout the world, iodine deficiency is the most common cause of brain damage. Deficiency in pregnant women can result in miscarriage or stillbirth, low birth weight, and congenital abnormalities such as cretinism, a severe condition characterized by stunted growth and mental retardation. In children, iodine deficiency can impair physical and mental growth and development, and in both children and adults, goiter (enlarged thyroid) ran result.

High iodine intake may or may not result in symptoms because people vary widely in their tolerance of excess amounts. Most people who haven’t been iodine deficient can handle large amounts without problems, but some individuals may experience conditions such as hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

An Iodine Test is also known as Iodine Serum. No fasting is required prior to the test, and results will be available within two to three days. A prior doctor’s visit is not required to order this test. Patients also do not need insurance.

See also Walk-In Lab’s Iodine Urine Test.

Edited by guitarman01

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http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/symptoms-of-iodine-deficiency/

I am also interested in who has had iodine tested and what method was used.

So we know that accutane effects the thyroid and everyone gets clear blood test results but know that many doctors and patients 
argue that signs of hypothyroidism are being ignored because of within range blood test results.
Also there is an argument that T3 is not being tested for or treated. TPA say that many are suffering because lack of adequate testing, knowledge and understanding.

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http://www.medschat.com/Discuss/accutane-long-term-side-effects-191307_p14.htm 

You guys seen this website? Kind of like this one. But only 94 pages... 
The cases seem much more extreme then what I've seen on here for the most part. Alot of informed stuff though. Alot of depressing stuff actually. 

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