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Intermittent Fasting -Improves Many Factors Involved In Acne, Aging & Disease

fasting fasting intermittent fasting intermittent fasting diet diet acne acne sugar sugar insulin insulin

Best Answer Walid, 02 July 2012 - 06:00 PM

I guess that's why my Acne seems to clear up during the Ramadan... Go to the full post


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#81 o Havoc o

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:27 AM

I still not be sold on IF.

 

As i said before, interesting data but more study is needed.

 

My concern is, what the long term hormonal effects? Little or no data on that.

 

Right now i will stick with what i know to work



#82 alternativista

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:45 PM

The BulletProof Exec's version including Bulletproof Coffee

 

So this guy, the bulletproof exec, a blogger who recommends a paleo type diet, offers his 'biohacked' bulletproof version of intermittent fasting, in which you skip breakfast, but you do a cup of bulletproof coffee which involves a toxin free coffee which he sells, with butter and MCT oil, medium chain triglycerides which he also sells and claims to be '6x stronger than coconut oil, your next best choice.  He got the idea from Tibetan yak butter tea.  You can have as much of this coffee as you like in the morning before you work out. Then you can have another cup whenever you want before 2pm, when you have your first meal. And last meal by 8pm. 

 

http://www.bulletpro...ur-morning-too/

http://www.bulletproofexec.com/blog/

 

He also states 

 

'There are 3 known ways to raise mTOR. Intermittent fasting, exercise, and coffee (or more weakly, chocolate, green tea, turmeric, or resveratrol)  Bulletproof Fasting hits all 3 ways to compress mTOR, causing a bigger rebound and better use of your food for muscle building.

See our mTor thread: http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/324134-mtor-inhibition-and-what-it-really-means/?hl=mtor

 

His bio

Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley investor, computer security expert, and entrepreneur who spent 15 years and $250,000 to hack his own biology. He upgraded his brain by >20 IQ points, lowered his biological age, and lost 100 lbs without using calories or exercise. The Financial Times calls him a "bio-hacker who takes self-quantification to the extreme of self-experimentation." His writing has been published by the New York Times and Fortune, and he's presented at Wharton, Kellogg, the University of California, and Singularity University.

 

While he promotes a paleo type diet, he's not really about a natural lifestyle. But a very hacked one. Although many hacks might be inspired by people living a more natural lifestyle.

 

I think it might be a good idea to have a spoonful or so of coconut oil for the readily available energy before you head out for your workout or day, whatever it is you do before eating. 


Edited by alternativista, 20 December 2013 - 07:18 PM.


#83 alternativista

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:10 PM

Effect of intermittent fasting and refeeding on insulin action in healthy men

Thus our genotype selected centuries ago to favor an environment with oscillations in energy stores still exists with few if any changes. The modern sedentary lifestyle common in the westernized countries is characterized by constant high food availability and low physical activity, and it has led to an imbalance between our genotype and the environment in which we live today. This may predispose our potential “thrifty” genes to misexpress metabolic proteins, manifesting in chronic diseases (e.g., Type 2 diabetes) in the industrialized part of the world.

It is well known that physical training increases insulin action (10). The molecular events leading to an exercise- mediated increase in insulin action are not fully characterized. In addition, energy usage during each exercise bout in the training regimen with subsequent eating creates oscillations in energy stores. These oscillations are probably not as massive as the oscillations seen between periods of feast and famine for the Late-Paleolithic people, but some similarities might exist, and we speculated whether exercise-induced oscillations in energy stores could be mimicked by intermittent fasting. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that 14 days of intermittent fasting and refeeding improves insulin-stimulated glucose disposal.

 

Discussion of the results

 

 

 

In conclusion, the findings that intermittent fasting increases insulin sensitivity on the whole body level as well as in adipose tissue support the view that cycles of feast and famine are important as an initiator of thrifty genes leading to improvements in metabolic function (6). We suggest that a fasting-induced increase in circulating adiponectin is at least partly responsible for this finding. The change in adiponectin, together with changes in plasma leptin with fasting, underlines the important role of the adipose tissue in recognizing the oscillation in energy stores. Finally, the data indicate that intermittent fasting and physical training may increase insulin action via different mechanisms because muscle energy stores did not change with the present fasting intervention.



#84 o Havoc o

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:28 AM

In regards to exercise and IF. If the goal is to build muscle this is not an optimal way to go about it, and the same for optimal fat loss.

 

With the above. There is too much speculation in that study to draw any concrete facts out of it,

 

I maintain my stance that further long term study is needed.

 

I have tried IF and i did not like it one bit.

 

I can only speak for myself but the last time i got my bloods tested everything was where it needed to be including the ever popular IGF-1 Hormone.

 

Flexible eating for the win.



#85 alternativista

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:40 AM

Here's a clue on how IF improves insulin sensitivity:  This is from a blog post of Dr.Michael Eames:  He doesn't provide sources for the statement below.  Just a link to the same alternate day fasting studies on humans previously posted in this thread.
 
BDNF

 
Animals that are intermittently fasted greatly increase the amount of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) relative to CR animals. CR animals don’t produce much more BDNF than do ad libitum fed animals.
What’s BDNF? (The Wikipedia definition is actually pretty good)
BDNF, as its name implies, is a substance that increases the growth of new nerve cells in the brain, but it does much more than that. BDNF is neuroprotective against stress and toxic insults to the brain and is somehow–no one yet knows how, exactly–involved in the insulin sensitivity/glucose regulating mechanism. Infusing BDNF into animals increases their insulin sensitivity and makes them lose weight. Humans with greater levels of BDNF have lower levels of depression. BDNF given to depressed humans reduces their depression. And Increased levels of BDNF improves cognitive ability. In short, you want as much BDNF as you can get., and with IF you can get a lot.
 

 
Here's an Abstract for a Paper on Intermittent fasting effects on  BDNF.  http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/16011467. For some reason, there isn't thus usual list of related studies and citations in the right column. 
 
 
Here's study intended to determine how BDNF affects glucose metabolism by administering BDNF to diabetic mice.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10868966

And another involving an intermittent administration of BDNF to diabetic mice

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18499057   

By intermittent, they mean once and twice a week.

(Does that demonstrate that there's still significant benefit when intermittent fasting only a few times per week. Because that's kinda how I do it.  When I'm not hungry, or its easy to eat early, or I have something super nutrient dense but low calorie to have in the evening, etc.) 

 

On the other hand, this study on humans with diabetes found that high levels of glucose inhibit the output of BDNF. So...

http://www.researchg...trophic_factor_(BDNF)_and_type_2_diabetes

 

Also, High intensity interval training also boosts BDNF.


Edited by alternativista, 01 July 2013 - 06:05 PM.


#86 alternativista

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 07:08 AM

Post filled with studies on impact of fasting on androgen levels.

 

Intermittent Fasting/energy Restriction For The Regulation Of Androgens


http://www.acne.org/...n-of-androgens/

 

Other related threads:

http://www.acne.org/...rglycemia-acne/

http://www.acne.org/...ed-to-try-this/


Edited by alternativista, 20 December 2013 - 07:23 PM.


#87 alternativista

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 06:04 PM

In a post about autophagy and the benefits of Intermittent Fasting. http://jdmoyer.com/2...ill-eat-itself/


 

Autophagy — it sounds like some kind of disease from the Star Trek universe. In fact, autophagy is a normal biological process. During autophagy, organelles called lysosomes break down waste products inside the cells. What’s an organelle? An organelle is a tiny part of your cell, usually with its own membrane, that serves a specific function (like a cellular organ). Lysosomes break down other worn-out organelles, digest food particles, and destroy viruses and bacteria (using hydrolase enzymes). You could think of them as the stomach of the cell, and/or part of the cellular immune system

 

Without autophagy, damaged organelles survive, and cells become less efficient. Autophagy may protect against neurodegeneration, viral and bacterial infections, and cancer.



#88 alternativista

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 06:48 PM

Bump. Because I'd forgotten about this for awhile and fell out of the habit.  Started again today. Ate my last meal at about 4:30 and won't eat again until 7am.  (Sauteed greens & leeks with a few eggs. )  That's a 14 hour fast for today.



Mercola posted on this in his newsletter today, as he's done dozens of times. Always with a slightly different emphasis and often citing new references:

 

http://fitness.merco...eight-loss.aspx

 

This time mentions a new one--the 5:2 Diet--because it was recently written up in the wall street journal.  And also explains this:

 

In order to understand how you can fast daily while still eating every day, you need to understand some basic facts about metabolism. It takes most people eight to 12 hours for their body to burn the sugar stored in your body as glycogen. Now, most people never deplete their glycogen stores because they eat three or more meals a day. This teaches your body to burn sugar as your primary fuel and effectively shuts off your ability to use fat as a fuel.

 

That last bit is just about weightloss & stored body fat burning.  Not about the other benefits. But time to depleting the glycogen stores is relevant.



#89 FaithBox

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 01:41 AM

i heard skipping meals causes your stress levels to go up?



#90 FaithBox

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:02 AM

sorry for double post. without losing too much weight, how often should IF be done? for example if I wanted to IF for 16 hours , should this be done once a week, once a month? should I go for a light run when I wake up or do pullups? (around 15-16th hour)



#91 alternativista

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 07:54 AM

sorry for double post. without losing too much weight, how often should IF be done? for example if I wanted to IF for 16 hours , should this be done once a week, once a month? should I go for a light run when I wake up or do pullups? (around 15-16th hour)


You don't necessarily skip meals, you just fit them into a smaller window of time leaving a longer period, which includes the hours you sleep, as a fast. Or you alternate days of reduced calorie intake. But you also don't eat less food.

You can do it daily or as often as is convenient to you. And yes exercising in a fasted state can be beneficial. Click on the links throughout the thread.

#92 alternativista

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:38 AM

Bump

#93 dscully

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:54 AM

I do this, and I didn't know it was a thing. I skip breakfast and lunch and don't eat food until dinner. I do drink vegetable juice from midmorning to around noon, though... Guess that makes it not a fast.



#94 alternativista

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 02:25 PM

I do this, and I didn't know it was a thing. I skip breakfast and lunch and don't eat food until dinner. I do drink vegetable juice from midmorning to around noon, though... Guess that makes it not a fast.

If it's very few calories, then it's a fast.



#95 alternativista

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:13 AM

Article about the "diseases of Civilization" in this age & culture of too much food all the time and too little activity when we are genetically predisposed to not have enough food and to store as much as possible when we do.  They don't mention acne, but it's one of them.
 
http://www.medicalne...eases/29755.php

Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century1,2  and the extreme discord between what/how we eat & how/what we are adapted to eat.  And the resulting chronic disease.  http://ajcn.nutritio...t/81/2/341.full



#96 silverlight22

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:57 PM

Article about the "diseases of Civilization" in this age & culture of too much food all the time and too little activity when we are genetically predisposed to not have enough food and to store as much as possible when we do.  They don't mention acne, but it's one of them.
 
http://www.medicalne...eases/29755.php
Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century1,2  and the extreme discord between what/how we eat & how/what we are adapted to eat.  And the resulting chronic disease.  http://ajcn.nutritio...t/81/2/341.full


I have Ramadan coming up in a couple of days. I've noticed before that my skin really improves during that time period of 30 days.

Just have one concern. We are supposed to break our fast with dates. I'm wondering if this will cause huge insulin spikes and lead to a breakout. Its something that I will have to monitor closely. This year around our fasts will last for around 18 hours here in Canada. So let's see how that turns.

I'll keep you guys updated

#97 alternativista

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 08:27 AM

I do this, and I didn't know it was a thing. I skip breakfast and lunch and don't eat food until dinner. I do drink vegetable juice from midmorning to around noon, though... Guess that makes it not a fast.

If it's very few calories, then it's a fast.

Although, one of the goals is promote fat burning over carbs. If you give your body carbs in the form of the juices it might not do that to the same degree. But that is mostly about fat loss.

Article about the "diseases of Civilization" in this age & culture of too much food all the time and too little activity when we are genetically predisposed to not have enough food and to store as much as possible when we do.  They don't mention acne, but it's one of them.
 http://www.medicalne...eases/29755.php
Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century1,2  and the extreme discord between what/how we eat & how/what we are adapted to eat.  And the resulting chronic disease.  http://ajcn.nutritio...t/81/2/341.full


I have Ramadan coming up in a couple of days. I've noticed before that my skin really improves during that time period of 30 days.
Just have one concern. We are supposed to break our fast with dates. I'm wondering if this will cause huge insulin spikes and lead to a breakout. Its something that I will have to monitor closely. This year around our fasts will last for around 18 hours here in Canada. So let's see how that turns.
I'll keep you guys updated

Can't wait to hear about it. You might limit the dates. And keep moving around. But IF improves insulin sensitivity so having them as part of a fast is better than snacking on them when not fasting. Your cells should be depleted of stores so will readily take in the sugar.

#98 alternativista

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:28 PM

This study tested a one week fast of some sort, but intermittent fasting has been found in so many areas to be just as effective.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/12748412

 

Effects of short-term modified fasting on sleep patterns and daytime vigilance in non-obese subjects: results of a pilot study. Abstract BACKGROUND:

Periodically repeated short-term fasting is a frequently practised tradition worldwide. Empirical reports suggest that during fasting periods the quality of sleep and daytime performance are improved. The effects of a home-based 1-week modified fasting on sleep patterns and daytime vigilance and performance were analysed in 15 healthy non-obese volunteers.

METHODS:

Sleep was measured by polysomnography before and after a 7-day fasting period; sleep inventories with assessment of daytime performance were collected throughout the observation period. Blood samples and urine were drawn at the beginning and at the end of fasting.

RESULTS:

13 subjects (12 females, 1 male; age 41.2 +/- 13.4 years; BMI 23.9 +/- 4.2 kg/m(2)) completed the fasting period; weight decreased from 66.5 +/- 11.7 kg to 63 +/- 11.9 kg. Compared to baseline, a significant decrease in arousals, a decrease in periodic leg movements (PLM) and a non-significant increase in REM sleep were observed at the end of fasting. Subjective sleep ratings showed a fasting-induced increase in global quality of sleep, daytime concentration, vigour and emotional balance. Clinical laboratory tests showed a decrease in serum magnesium; urinary melatonin excretion decreased moderately.

CONCLUSION:

This open pilot study demonstrates that along with a decrease in sleep arousals a 1-week fasting period promotes the quality of sleep and daytime performance in non-obese subjects. The observed decrease in PLM might point to a nutritional modification of brain dopaminergic functions. In terms of evolutionary development, an improved daytime performance during periods of food deprivation could have been beneficial for the success in search for food.






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