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Does oily skin really stay younger looking longer?

oily skin

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#1 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:04 PM

I've had a ton of people over the years try to make me feel better about my oily skin by saying "it's a blessing in disguise. Oily skin stays younger than other skin."

I do look way younger than other 35 year olds I know, and my skin is really pale so it's not that I have a lot of melanin to protect me from sun damage. But this is all anecdotal evidence. I'd love to know if there is any scientific evidence for oily skin staying young longer, or if it is all just urban legend.

#2 Wynne

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:09 PM

Staying out of the sun protects you from wrinkles, not oily skin. smile.gif

#3 californiaEstie

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:12 PM

I think it's true (not for everyone but semi true).

If you ever notice people complaining about dry skin they often have wrinkles that go along with it. Oil keeps the skin moist and kind of creates a barrier against dryness and the elements. I think it will keep you younger looking than people with dry skin- to what extent I don't know though.

There was also a recent study - I'll have to look more closely at it- but the basic premise is that un moisturized skin will age faster than moisturized skin. Oil kind of plays into moisture... so I think it's true.

Edited by bek_cogent, 16 November 2010 - 04:16 PM.


#4 Sanderella24

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:14 PM

I think it does too. My mom has oily skin and she still looks beautiful. Def looks 10-15 years younger than her actual age. She also has avoided the sun. Both def. play a role. wink.gif

I look like I'm 15 cause of my oil. I'll be turning 21 in a week and a month ago I was asked if I was old enough to drive. wink.gif

#5 Michellica

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:21 PM

I don't have any scientific evidence but my dermatologist has told me that it's true. Also, my parents both had oily skin when they were younger and everyone thinks they look much younger than they are. smile.gif

#6 jpefive

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:48 PM

From older oily-skinned people that I've seen, it looks pretty true. Which is bad news for us dry-skinned folks. sad.gif

#7 bryan

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 08:29 PM

QUOTE (Michellica @ Nov 16 2010, 04:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't have any scientific evidence but my dermatologist has told me that it's true.


Did he suggest any reason or explanation for why that would be the case, or was he just trying to make you feel a bit better about oily skin? smile.gif

I've read a fair number of articles and studies in medical journals about issues having to do with sebum and human skin, and I've never seen anything from any of those medical professionals about why or how oily skin would stay younger looking longer.

#8 bryan

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 08:50 PM

QUOTE (bek_cogent @ Nov 16 2010, 04:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you ever notice people complaining about dry skin they often have wrinkles that go along with it. Oil keeps the skin moist and kind of creates a barrier against dryness and the elements. I think it will keep you younger looking than people with dry skin- to what extent I don't know though.

There was also a recent study - I'll have to look more closely at it- but the basic premise is that un moisturized skin will age faster than moisturized skin. Oil kind of plays into moisture... so I think it's true.


My understanding from the medical literature I've read is that the vast majority of oil on the skin (like 90% to 95% or so) comes from sebum, rather than oils of epidermal origin. Kligman did an early study in which he applied external sebum to human skin while measuring its ability to suppress the loss of water from the skin; he found that he had to apply literally 10 times the amount of sebum that normally occurs on oily parts of the body (like the face!), before it began to have even a measurable effect on extra moisture retention! In other words, people in general greatly over-play the alleged effect of oil (sebum) on keeping the skin hydrated. It doesn't really do that to any significant extent.

#9 Sanderella24

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 09:50 AM

hm. I have no scientific evidence either. But I do think that oily skin some how goes people to age more gracefully. What's the point of moisturizing then? My younger sister has dry skin and already has slight wrinkles on her forehead. Me on the other hand.... none at all.

#10 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:16 PM

Yep! Everyone in my life seems to think oily skin stays younger looking, but it's hard to find research! Let me know if anyone finds anything.

And of course, sunscreen sunscreen sunscreen!

#11 bryan

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 05:14 PM

QUOTE (Lipslikesugar22 @ Nov 17 2010, 10:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have no scientific evidence either. But I do think that oily skin some how goes people to age more gracefully. What's the point of moisturizing then?


The point of moisturizing is to keep the skin moister and healthier, which obviously _may_ have an effect on how well it ages. But what was the point of putting your second and third sentences together above? As I've pointed out a number of times in the past, there is no connection between oily skin (oily from sebum) and moisture retention. Young children produce almost no sebum at all, yet aren't known for having dry skin. A study of elderly people by dermatologists found no correlation between the amount of sebum they produce and the level of moisture in their skin. We need to get away from this myth that sebum has any measurable effect on moisture in the skin. eusa_wall.gif

#12 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 06:55 PM

Bryan, I totally get your point here, but as a funny, (or not so funny,) aside, I think I have AT LEAST 10x the normal amount of oil on my face. I may be one of the few examples of someone who actually matches that description! wink.gif

I wear it well, I swear, but geeez I am an oily one!

QUOTE (bryan @ Nov 16 2010, 09:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My understanding from the medical literature I've read is that the vast majority of oil on the skin (like 90% to 95% or so) comes from sebum, rather than oils of epidermal origin. Kligman did an early study in which he applied external sebum to human skin while measuring its ability to suppress the loss of water from the skin; he found that he had to apply literally 10 times the amount of sebum that normally occurs on oily parts of the body (like the face!), before it began to have even a measurable effect on extra moisture retention! In other words, people in general greatly over-play the alleged effect of oil (sebum) on keeping the skin hydrated. It doesn't really do that to any significant extent.



#13 wowacne

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 06:58 PM

ITS NOT "it's a blessing in disguise". What do you mean in disguise.. oily skin is a nightmare and to the people who look at you.

I also want to add that oily skin will tend to have bigger pores now and will be especially visible when you get older.

#14 bryan

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 10:06 PM

QUOTE (oilyoilyoily @ Nov 17 2010, 07:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Bryan, I totally get your point here, but as a funny, (or not so funny,) aside, I think I have AT LEAST 10x the normal amount of oil on my face. I may be one of the few examples of someone who actually matches that description! wink.gif


That could be taken a couple of different ways, and I'm not completely sure which one you mean:

1) You have 10 times or more the amount of oil on your face as you do on other parts of your body.

2) You have 10 times or more the amount of oil on your face as other people have on their faces.

Which one of those did you mean? I may have an additional comment or question, depending on your answer to that question! smile.gif

#15 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:50 AM

Bryan,

I meant ten times more than other people. Like, at least tens times more.

And I expect you to have thorough critical feedback. That is one reason I appreciate your posts. whistling.gif)


#16 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:52 AM

QUOTE (wowacne @ Nov 17 2010, 07:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
ITS NOT "it's a blessing in disguise". What do you mean in disguise.. oily skin is a nightmare and to the people who look at you.

I also want to add that oily skin will tend to have bigger pores now and will be especially visible when you get older.



Yeah! That whole big-pore thing is weird. Does anyone know if oil actually causes that or what actually does make pores big?

#17 {DC}

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 07:58 AM

yes excessive sebum output will cause pores to enlarge or give off that appearance.

#18 bryan

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 01:40 PM

QUOTE (oilyoilyoily @ Nov 18 2010, 02:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Bryan,

I meant ten times more than other people. Like, at least tens times more.


I saw in another thread that you recently ordered some Sebutape. I hope it's the "Skin Indicators" like I use that you ordered, and not the more professional test-strips that doctors and scientists generally use for their studies (you hold the Skin Indicators against your skin for only 5 seconds, and you've already got the results). If so, it would be interesting for you to test your own skin, scan the Skin Indicators with a scanner (assuming you have one), and post the scan for all of us to see. I could do the same thing with my _own_ skin, and we could compare your scans with my own results, and see how much oilier you are than I am! smile.gif

#19 oilyoilyoily

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:45 PM

QUOTE (bryan @ Nov 18 2010, 02:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (oilyoilyoily @ Nov 18 2010, 02:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Bryan,

I meant ten times more than other people. Like, at least tens times more.


I saw in another thread that you recently ordered some Sebutape. I hope it's the "Skin Indicators" like I use that you ordered, and not the more professional test-strips that doctors and scientists generally use for their studies (you hold the Skin Indicators against your skin for only 5 seconds, and you've already got the results). If so, it would be interesting for you to test your own skin, scan the Skin Indicators with a scanner (assuming you have one), and post the scan for all of us to see. I could do the same thing with my _own_ skin, and we could compare your scans with my own results, and see how much oilier you are than I am! smile.gif



Hi there, yes, I think I did get the correct ones. Will let you know when they arrive. They come with instructions, so I'll be able to figure it out.

And I don't have a scanner at home, but there is a copy store nearby. Maybe I'll get motivated and post my results.



#20 greentiger87

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 02:57 PM

I've accepted the uselessness of sebum. But I wonder if there's any correlation between epidermal lipid production and sebum production. Is epidermal lipid production also androgen-controlled? It's clearly inhibited by retinoids in the same way as sebum, explaining Accutane's amazing ability to dry up parts of your skin you didn't know you had. It'd be amazing if you could find a selective inhibitor of sebaceous glands... you'd putatively get acne reduction without dryness.

Sorry, I'm just thinking out loud.... I'm gonna do some research when I have time. Feel free to enlighten me if you already know things.