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Bee Sting Scar Therapy *Warning* You must clear it with your Doctor first!

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#1 2001

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 11:56 AM

I don't want anyone dying, and lots of people are allergic to bees, so anyone who would consider trying this. You better see a doctor first and get an allergy test done to see if you are allergic to bee stings.

I found this on the net while surfing.

::::::::hmmmm I can't post links:::::::: eusa_think.gif


This person doesn't seem to be selling anything, just free advice. He was treating his MS with Bee Stings, and knowing that Multiple Sclerosis is just Multiple Scars- As he says on his site. He decided to sting a 14 year old surgical scar he had on his hand. He only did it one time. The result is posted down below. He believes more sting treatments will make the scar go away completely. His interest wasnt in removing scars though. Just proving that Bee Stings work for those who have MS.

He's the only person I found on the net that claims this. I'm thinking about trying it. I have to be sure I'm not allergic first. I've been stung many times in past, but I'd rather be sure.

I see my doctor every month for INR level checks since I had a DVT. So I will find out within a few weeks.

I hope like most of you that this isn't another snake oil tale. It could be, who knows, but I found this and I wanted to share it here, and I plan to try it on a tiny keloid scar on my nose caused by a cig lighter prank.

If it works on scars it might work of stretchmarks also.

Again- Do not dare even try this until you have seen a doctor. If you are allergic, your blood pressure could drop and you will die. Also I would think moderation would be better than doing tons of stings at one time. Since that could probably kill you as well. So I'm a tad bit leery to mention this because I know there is a chance that one of you will dive in head first and maybe wind up in a coffin because you didn't listen or were not worried about the dangers.

See a Doctor. If you are allergic maybe there is an allergist who can treat you to be less allergic, and surely someone will try this soon and we will see if it works or not.

Attached Thumbnails

  • scar.jpg

Edited by 2001, 02 October 2010 - 12:29 PM.


#2 DudleyDoRight

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 01:16 PM

apitherapy (bee sting therapy, bee venom therapy): Administration of honeybee stings to treat a wide variety of illnesses. Apitherapy allegedly "unleashes" the body's "healing power." According to one theory, the "energetics" of bees and their venom is key to the method.

Happy Reading!

http://www.apitherapy.org/

http://www.apitherapy.com/

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Apitherapy

This is a PubMed link, and probably the only one that does not have an agenda.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2586305/

#3 bio_nerd

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 02:34 PM

I doubt anyone is gonna go stick their head in a beehive after reading this.

The bee venom causes sclerolysis (dissolving of tissue)

So, the theory is of you get stung on a scar than it will dissolve
the scar tissue and rebuild anew.

Might work.



#4 Mr President

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:22 PM

it could work. i did a quick search of it here in australia and i couldnt find too much info. our big research body "the CSIRO" found it might be useful, however they have said it was illegal for anyone to practice it. they were more interested in using a modified form - capable of breaking down cell walls but having lost of its other properties in an attempt to make it safer.

i did notice there are a few places in the US doing it, however their sites looked a bit dodgy.

its interesting, but i doubt you could treat many scars at once. afterall, too many bee stings, will kill someone. i'd need about 80 or 90 bee stings and would obviously be found dead as a result. what a painful death !

not to mention all the dead bees as a result. hmm would we be willing to kill 90 bees for our own happiness.....*perhaps*.

Edited by cartwheeling_monkey, 02 October 2010 - 07:24 PM.


#5 Mr President

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 06:14 PM

any new info on this. i have a renewed interest wink.gif

#6 Starlite

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 07:58 PM

I took a couple of beekeeping classes at my school. My teacher said that beekeepers have a lower rate of arthritis. There have been studies, but no solid evidence that bee venom cures MS. Probably because there is no drug company to push and fund the research.

I'm impressed by those pics because the scar was obviously pretty old. It probably involved multiple treatments, I imagine.

#7 Mr President

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 08:25 PM

QUOTE (Starlite @ Mar 12 2011, 12:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I took a couple of beekeeping classes at my school. My teacher said that beekeepers have a lower rate of arthritis. There have been studies, but no solid evidence that bee venom cures MS. Probably because there is no drug company to push and fund the research.

I'm impressed by those pics because the scar was obviously pretty old. It probably involved multiple treatments, I imagine.


The guy who took the pic said it was just after one sting, which seems quite nice.He says if he stung it a few more times the scar might disappear smile.gif

The only thing worrying me is the pleasing light in the second pic, which might make the scar look a bit better and the fear of tissue atrophy when the scar tissue breaks down.

all up, it seems interesting tho smile.gif

#8 Starlite

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 08:54 PM

QUOTE (Mr President @ Mar 11 2011, 09:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Starlite @ Mar 12 2011, 12:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I took a couple of beekeeping classes at my school. My teacher said that beekeepers have a lower rate of arthritis. There have been studies, but no solid evidence that bee venom cures MS. Probably because there is no drug company to push and fund the research.

I'm impressed by those pics because the scar was obviously pretty old. It probably involved multiple treatments, I imagine.


The guy who took the pic said it was just after one sting, which seems quite nice.He says if he stung it a few more times the scar might disappear smile.gif

The only thing worrying me is the pleasing light in the second pic, which might make the scar look a bit better and the fear of tissue atrophy when the scar tissue breaks down.

all up, it seems interesting tho smile.gif



Well, even if there was a lighting difference, you can see a white mark/scar on the left side of the pic that looks pretty much the same in the second pic. It also doesn't seem to be touched up. I'm really impressed that one sting could do that!

#9 Mr President

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 08:12 PM

I spoke to someone involved in bee therapy and showed him the photo. He believes the faded scar in the after pic is actually a temporary redness that occurs with most bee stings and would disappear in a few days, once again leaving the white scar.

I've emailled the guy whose scar it is and will see what he says about it. I hope hes not a liar sad.gif

Edited by Mr President, 12 March 2011 - 09:03 PM.


#10 DC-girl

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:39 PM

I spoke to someone involved in bee therapy and showed him the photo. He believes the faded scar in the after pic is actually a temporary redness that occurs with most bee stings and would disappear in a few days, once again leaving the white scar.

I've emailled the guy whose scar it is and will see what he says about it. I hope hes not a liar Posted Image


Did you ever hear back from him on this?

#11 DRaGZ

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 04:36 PM

No. Just...no.