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Low carb helps acne

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#1 aaa

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 01:59 AM

This is my first post here but I found something that worked for me so I thought I'd share. I started the Atkins diet about a month ago and my skin has been improving. I noticed a difference about a week after starting. I started the Dan's regime about 1 week ago. My skin is very close to being as clear as it's been in years.

Very low carb diets reduce insulin levels. Insulin spikes influence other hormones that can cause acne. It's working for me and it might work for you.

I'm attaching two links which explain current research about carbs and acne. One of them also gives a list of foods that cause the highest insulin spikes (Glycemic Index). They are worth reading. If you have any questions about what they are talking about... just post your question... I'll be happy to try to explain.


http://news.bbc.co.u...lth/2542801.stm

http://www.dermadoct.....98041C712422}

#2 jc

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 08:37 AM

Another one is here:

http://www.acne-advice.com/diet/

#3 evigrex

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 12:53 PM

You can't attribute acne to insulin or pancreas over simulation.

If that were the case, every diabetic you ever knew would have horrible
acne since they don't eliminate glucose properly.

#4 Chloe646

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 01:46 PM

Hey, I know diet definitely affects skin. It affects every other body organ so it only makes sense. i know that eating soy/going vegetarian for a couple years (so much for a healthy diet it was a HUGE mistake) gave me bad acne and caused me to get some noticeable scars. Before that I had NEVER had cysts that left indents but because of the stupid media lies about soy and vegetarianism I thought for sure it was hereditary. anyway I was put on accuatne (6 years ago) and now I very rarely hve pimples. I mostly have some blackheads and mild breakouts, but still those ugle scars because they didn't heal well while I was vegetarian (which is also when I was put on accutane so it was a double whammy) Also my teeth and gums were really affected and I had always had perfect teeth without braces. Oh yeah, photofacials help diminish scars and red marks, for real!

If you find you are also feeling crappy in other ways (i.e. teeth/gums, lethargic) diet could be the MAIN acne culprit, especially if your parents didn't have rampnat acne ya know. i don't use anything on my face now except sporadically and don't get cysts and when I do I almost never scar.

I've also never had issues with my weight, I'm really thin and eat a lot. I know there are very overweight people with good skin but maybe it's 'cause all the junk food goes in their hips/butt and not out on their skin! :blink: People are affected by diet differently, what can make on person fat. or another person's stomach ache, could make your skin break out.

By the way carbs/dairy cause my skin to grease up and eating LOTS of veggies like kale/broccoli/carrots/asparagus which is hard to do really helps my skin stay more clear. And yes, drinking LOTS of water does help, that's what helps keep your body running!

clear skin, good health vibes to everyone :dance:

#5 Sam The Man

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 02:34 PM

QUOTE(evigrex @ Jul 2 2004, 09:40 PM)
You can't attribute acne to insulin or pancreas over simulation.

If that were the case, every diabetic you ever knew would have horrible
acne since they don't eliminate glucose properly.

Wouldn't they be clear then, because they don't produce insulin. They have to inject it (if they are type 1 diabetics).

#6 aaa

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 02:45 PM

QUOTE(evigrex @ Jul 2 2004, 11:40 AM)
You can't attribute acne to insulin or pancreas over simulation.

If that were the case, every diabetic you ever knew would have horrible
acne since they don't eliminate glucose properly.

Some diabetics don't produce their own insulin so they must inject. Other diabetics are insulin resistant so they have chronically high levels of insulin. I don't know of any research that links that to acne.
But... in males especially... an insulin response (high insulin after carb ingestion) in linked to increased testosterone levels... and then increased sebum production.
It's an interesting theory. I found that it helped me by accident. I started LC, realized my skin was clearer and then searched for some info. about why.
I know everyone reacts differently to food/carbs. But if anyone is looking for another possible solution to help their skin... It would probably only take a couple weeks LC to know if it is working for you.
The downside is that switching to LC sucks for about a week. Your body will be craving carbs pretty bad until it has time to adjust.
If anyone is thinking about trying it but does'nt want to buy a book to figure out how... you can check out: www.lowcarb.ca It's a very active forum with lots of good info.

#7 evigrex

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 04:12 PM

This is your own theory. There are no studies whatsoever that tie
insulin and testosterone production together - interestingly enough,
the largest segment of people that require testosterone and erectile
disfunction therapy are DIABETICS (t1 and 2). How would that be the
case since they chronically produce more insulin (t2's) and have higher
post prandial blood glucose levels (t1 and t2)?

Again, back to my example. There are many type 1 diabetics and
type 2 diabetics that have totally clear skin. And not so clear skin.
You can't attribute acne to insulin, there is no link whatsoever -
if there was a link between insulin over-production and acne, all
type 2s would have horrible acne.

#8 aaa

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 05:53 PM

Ok... Really, I didn't just make it up. Anyway, here is one study that relates insulin to testosterone. I admit... it's not a perfectly consistent correlation, but there is good evidence, that for SOME people, reducing insulin levels can result in better skin.

----------------
Pasquali R. Macor C. Vicennati V. Novo F. De lasio R. Mesini P. Boschi S. Casimirri F. Vettor R. Effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on testosterone serum concentrations in adult obese and normal-weight men. Metabolism: Clinical & Experimental. 46(5):526-9, 1997 May.

The following are excerpts from the abstract:

In this study, we investigated the effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on major androgen levels, including testosterone...

Acute hyperinsulinemia was obtained by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique.

During the clamp study, testosterone was significantly increased in the obese group (11.79 +/- 3.64 nmol/L, P < .05) but not in the control group (15.81 +/- 4.54 nmol/L, P = NS).

These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin may regulate testosterone blood levels also in male subjects. Whether these effects are primarily due to increased hormone secretion or reduced clearance needs to be investigated.

#9 evigrex

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 06:25 PM

That study proves nothing. I hesitate to even call that a study, actually...its
pretty ridiculous.

There are obese people with perfectly normal glucose metabolism, and
skinny people with impaired glucose metabolism.....this study would have
been more helpful in evaluating the insulin sensitivity of all individuals involved,
instead of just putting them in a "normal" and "obese" group

#10 aaa

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 07:06 PM

Ok... I'm not the sort of person to argue just for the sake of argument. I understand your point about the diabetics.
As far as knowing for sure if LC works or not... we will have to wait for the Melbourne study to be completed... either LC will help or it wont. We will certainly see in the near future.

Do you have a different hypothesis about why hunter-gatherer societies don't have acne? It seems clear that some environmental factor is involved. I doubt that their genetics are very different than ours.

Here is some more detailed info. about the proposed carb-acne link.

The following is from: http://www.holdtheto...ive/030402.html

So how do refined starches cause acne? Dr. Cordain suggests a few mechanisms:


* It is well-established that high insulin levels trigger an increase in androgens - male hormones, like testosterone. This is the cause of poly cystic ovarian syndrome, now widely accepted as a carbohydrate intolerance disease - and one that is accompanied by serious acne. Those androgens, in turn, stimulate the production of sebum - skin oil. Result? Oily skin.


* At the same time that a diet high in refined carbohydrate is stimulating insulin and androgens, it is also stimulating the production of insulin-like growth factor-1, or IGF-1. At the same time, it reduces the level of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, or IGFBP-3, which counteracts IGF-1, which means that IGF-1 becomes even more powerful. I know the jargon is getting deep here, but stick with me; I'm getting to the point: As its name suggests, IGF-1 causes stuff in your body to grow by stimulating the division of cells. (Incidentally, and far more serious than acne, this means that IGF-1 is associated with many kinds of cancer.) When those cells that are dividing and growing are in your skin, they can cause overgrowth of the cells inside the sebaceous (oil) glands on the face. In short, clog city.


* IGFBP-3 levels are apparently interconnected with your body's ability to use various relatives of vitamin A, called retinoids. This part of the article involved some serious med-speak, but what I got out of it was this: Those retinoids help reduce the growth of those cells inside your sebaceous glands. This is no doubt why Retin-A and Accutane, the most-used prescriptions for acne, are powerful vitamin A-like chemicals. Anyway, eating junk carbs suppresses IGFBP-3, which in turn means your body can't use the vitamin A right to keep your skin clear.


In the meanwhile, halfway 'round the world, a team of researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia are planning a 3 month test of a low carb diet for acne treatment, using 60 teenaged boys as subjects. It will be one of the first clinical tests of the carbohydrate/acne theory.

#11 Kelly

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Posted 03 July 2004 - 03:22 AM

When will the Austrailian study be complete,do you know?

Women with PCOS are told to go on a low carb diet because high levels of insulin stimulate the ovaries to produce high levels of testosterone,thus increasing oil production and causing more acne.

#12 mischief2

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Posted 03 July 2004 - 03:29 AM

QUOTE(Chloe646 @ Jul 2 2004, 12:33 PM)
Hey, I know diet definitely affects skin. It affects every other body organ so it only makes sense. i know that eating soy/going vegetarian for a couple years (so much for a healthy diet it was a HUGE mistake) gave me bad acne and caused me to get some noticeable scars.

You think soy and going vegetarian affected your acne? Never seemed to affect mine, I found once I cut out dairy however, my skin is much better. I tend to drink soy milk instead of cows milk but am hearing conflicting information about drinking soy, so may change to rice milk. It's a shame, it's organic, whole bean and tastes yummy. sad.gif My understanding is soy products (as they are phytoestrogens) assist with hormone imbalance, I studied nutrition for some time. Two of my lecturers repeatedly told us this. So I thought it might help with my skin. I only drink half a glass of soy milk a day though, as a substitute in tea, etc. Suppose I could try cutting it out and see what happens.

#13 aaa

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Posted 03 July 2004 - 11:40 AM

QUOTE(Kelly @ Jul 3 2004, 02:09 AM)
When will the Austrailian study be complete,do you know?


I'm not sure when it will be done. Apparently the experiment will have two parts. One is with 60 people over 3 months. The other is totally clinical... In other words, the participants could not leave and their diets were closely monitored. That part is being finished right now.
You can check it out below:

http://www.rmit.edu....D=akojxfmz30vtz

Twelve teenage boys aged from 14 to 19 were involved in an eight-day live-in study at Ballarat University during January to investigate whether a diet of high protein foods and minimal refined carbohydrate foods could alleviate pimples and acne blemishes.

While pathology analysis of blood and urine taken from the participants is yet to be fully analysed, initial testing based on this theory held last year showed an improvement in skin condition after teenagers stuck to a high protein rather than their normal high carbohydrate diet.

During the Ballarat camp, the teenagers were split into two groups. One group was fed a diet of low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates and protein-rich foods including gourmet fish, beef and lamb and a range of vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes. The control group participants were fed a high-carbohydrate diet similar to that commonly eaten by teenagers, including ample servings of white bread, potatoes, rice and high GI snack foods such as chips, biscuits and baked products.

Associate Professor Mann said preliminary findings suggested that if individuals could stick to a low GI, higher protein diet at home, there was a high probability that acne severity could be significantly improved in most individuals. The biggest problem is stopping hungry teenagers snacking on readily available high GI snacks.

Pathology analysis of blood and urine from the study participants will be conducted at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in mid-2004 by RMIT PhD student Robyn Smith, to identify the effects of the controlled diet on hormonal influences of acne vulgaris and insulin regulation, and to shed more light on the controversial role of diet in acne.